Agriculture statistics at regional level - Statistics Explained

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Agriculture statistics at regional level




Data extracted in March 2020.

Planned article update: September 2021.

Highlights

Young farmers are relatively scarce in the EU: the highest regional shares of farmers under the age of 40 years were in Salzburg (Austria) and Franche Comte (France), where they represented about one quarter of all farmers in 2016.

Salzburg (Austria) was the only region in the EU where organic farming accounted for more than half (51.8 %) of the total utilised agricultural area (2016 data); the EU-27 average was 7.1 %.

Source: Eurostat

Agricultural products, food and culinary traditions are a major part of the European Union’s (EU’s) regional and cultural identity. This is, at least in part, due to a diverse range of natural environments, climates and farming practices that feed through into a wide array of agricultural products. A growing share of consumers give importance to the provenance of their food, for example choosing regional products or traditional specialities. This may be contrasted with the growing share of consumers who choose to shop in discount retailers that have radically changed the market for groceries in several EU Member States.

Around two fifths of the EU’s land is farmed: this underlines the important impact that farming can have on natural environments, natural resources, wildlife as well as soil and water quality. Farmers are increasingly being asked to manage the countryside for the benefit of everyone, delivering a public good, so that the whole of society can benefit from a countryside that is carefully managed and well looked after. There are a range of environmental issues that affect farmers in the EU, among which: the impact of climate change on agriculture and of agriculture on climate change; water pollution and scarcity; soil erosion and compaction; the impact of agriculture on air quality; preserving landscapes and biodiversity.

This article presents regional agricultural statistics focusing on four specific areas with information on: the age of farm managers; the harvested production of various cereals (common wheat and spelt; grain maize and corn-cob-mix); the number of bovine animals and milk production; the share of agricultural area that has been converted to organic farming.

Full article

Farm managers by age

Farm managers are people responsible for the normal daily financial and production routines of running a farm, such as what and how much to plant or rear and what labour, materials and equipment to employ. Often the farm manager is also the owner (otherwise referred to as the ’holder’) of the farm but this need not be the case, especially when the farm has a separate legal identity.

Slow generational renewal and a high average age for farmers are widespread issues across the EU’s farming sector. Access to finance is a particular concern for many young farmers: a high proportion of loan applications from young farmers are rejected by banks (see a Survey on financial needs and access to finance of EU agricultural enterprises). In May 2019, the European Commission and the European Investment Bank (EIB) launched a loans package for agriculture and the bioeconomy with specific targets to support young farmers. It forms part of a broader Young Farmers initiative that is managed by local banks and leasing companies active across the EU that includes a minimum 10 % allocation for farmers under the age of 40 years.

Around 10 % of all farm managers in the EU-27 were aged less than 40 years

In 2016, there were 10.3 million farms in the EU-27; together they used 157 million hectares of land for agricultural production. As there is only one farm manager per farm, the number of managers and the number of farms is the same. Young farmers — defined here as those aged less than 40 years — numbered almost 1.1 million in the EU-27. As such, they accounted for approximately one tenth (10.7 %) of all farm managers. The share of young farmers was highest in Austria (22.2 %) and Poland (20.3 %). By contrast, young farmers accounted for less than 5 % of farm managers in Portugal (4.2 %) and Cyprus (3.3 %).

Figure 1 provides a more detailed analysis for NUTS level 2 regions, listing the regions with the highest shares of young and old farm managers. In the vast majority of EU regions, the share of young farmers was less than 20.0 %: there were 18 regions in 2016 (out of 225 for which data are available) that reported a higher share. These regions were concentrated in Poland (nine) and Austria (six), while there were also two regions from Slovakia and a single region from France. The highest share of young farm managers was recorded in Salzburg (Austria; 27.6 %), while Franche-Comté (France; 25.2 %) was the only other region to report more than one quarter of all farm managers aged less than 40 years.

Although most of the EU population has settled into retirement by the age of 65, a relatively high share of the farming community continues to work beyond this age. In 2016, almost one third (32.8 %) of all farm managers in the EU-27 were older farmers — defined here as those aged 65 years or over. There were particularly high numbers of older farm managers in southern EU Member States and those eastern Member States characterised by a high level of semi-subsistence farming. This was notably the case in Portugal where older farmers accounted for more than half (51.9 %) of all farm managers. The highest share of older farm managers was recorded in the Algarve (63.1 %), while there were three more Portuguese regions — Centro, Área Metropolitana de Lisboa and Alentejo — that reported that a majority of their farm managers were aged 65 years or over.

Figure 1: Farm managers, 2016
(%, share of farm managers by age, by NUTS 2 regions)
Source: Eurostat (ef_m_farmang)

Map 1 shows the regional share of young farm managers in 2016. As noted above, a relatively high share of farm managers were aged less than 40 years in Austria and Poland and, to a lesser degree, a broad swathe of regions running across mainland Europe from western France to eastern Poland.

By contrast, farm managers aged less than 40 years were less common in more southerly regions of the EU. A low share of young farm managers may also reflect, among others, negative perceptions concerning careers in agriculture or a lack of access to land, capital and knowledge. In 2016, there were 43 regions in the EU where fewer than 7.5 % of all farm managers were aged less than 40 years (as shown by the lightest shade in Map 1). They included, among others, the Mediterranean islands of Cyprus and Malta, a majority of regions in Portugal and Romania and several regions of Greece, Spain and Italy, as well as all five regions of Denmark.

Map 1: Young farm managers, 2016
(%, share of farm managers aged < 40 years, by NUTS 2 regions)
Source: Eurostat (ef_m_farmang)

Cereals

Arable land is often used for the production of cereals, one of the most important outputs of the EU’s agricultural sector. Cereals are used primarily for human consumption and animal feed, but they may also be used to make drinks and industrial products (for example, starch).

Map 2: Harvested production of common wheat and spelt, 2018
(million tonnes, by NUTS 2 regions)
Source: Eurostat (apro_cpshr)

Common wheat and spelt

There is considerable diversity in relation to the types of cereal that are grown in the EU, with regional specialisation reflecting, at least to some degree, topography, soil type, climate and rainfall, or competing land uses. In 2018, the harvested production of cereals in the EU-27 was 274.3 million tonnes. Common wheat and spelt (115.6 million tonnes or 42.1 % of total cereals production) was the most frequently grown category of cereals.

Map 2 shows the level of common wheat and spelt production across NUTS level 2 regions. Common wheat and spelt accounted for a majority of all cereals production in almost one third of EU regions (67 out of 215 for which data are available; note that the statistics presented for Germany relate to NUTS level 1 regions and that data for Italy refer to 2016). Production was principally located in lowland regions characterised by large plains, a temperate climate and relatively modest levels of rainfall. The highest levels of harvested production generally ran in a band of regions from northern France, through Germany, extending into eastern regions of the EU along the floodplains of the Danube. Much lower levels of production were recorded in some of the most northerly and southerly regions of the EU (where soil and climatic conditions were less favourable) and mountainous areas (for example in much of Austria).

In 2018, the highest level of harvested production of common wheat and spelt was recorded in Centre — Val de Loire (France; 4.4 million tonnes). There was a similar level of output in Picardie (also France; 4.3 million tonnes), while three more French regions — Champagne-Ardenne, Nord-Pas de Calais and Pays de la Loire — were also present among the 10 EU regions with the highest levels of production (see Figure 2). The harvested production of common wheat and spelt was also relatively high in Castilla y León (north-west Spain) and Bayern (southern Germany), as both of these regions produced 3.6 million tonnes (note again that the statistics presented for Germany relate to NUTS level 1 regions).

Figure 2 also presents information on the 10 EU regions with the largest cultivated areas of common wheat and spelt. As may be expected, most regions with high levels of harvested production also had large cultivated areas. The differences between the two rankings reflect regional yields, which in turn reflect variations in a wide range of factors, such as: rainfall, temperature, or the use of nutrients and pesticides. In 2018, Castilla y León had the largest cultivated area of common wheat and spelt (8 730 km²), followed by Vidurio ir vakarų Lietuvos regionas (Lithuania; 7 240 km²) and Centre — Val de Loire (6 450 km²).

Figure 2: Top regions in the EU for the production of common wheat and spelt, 2018
(by NUTS 2 regions)
Source: Eurostat (apro_cpshr)

Grain maize and corn-cob-mix

A majority of the EU’s production of grain maize and corn-cob mix is used by livestock farmers as a high energy ingredient in animal feed. The data presented below excludes the production of sweet corn cobs for human consumption and maize that is harvested green for fodder or renewable energy use.

In 2018, grain maize and corn-cob-mix accounted for one quarter (25.2 %) of the EU-27’s total cereals production. As such, this was the second most frequently produced category of cereals (behind common wheat and spelt). EU-27 production of grain maize and corn-cob-mix was 69.0 million tonnes in 2018.

There were 28 different NUTS level 2 regions (out of 214 for which data are available) where the production of grain maize and corn-cob-mix was higher than 1.0 million tonnes in 2018. Note that the statistics presented for Germany relate to NUTS level 1 regions and that data for Italy refer to 2016. The production of grain maize and corn-cob-mix was relatively concentrated, as these 28 regions together accounted for approximately 70 % of the EU’s output. A majority of the regions that were specialised in the production of grain maize and corn-cob mix were located in southern and eastern EU Member States, where there are typically the necessary warm temperatures required. From the western Member States, there were several French regions as well as Bayern in Germany that were relatively specialised in the production of grain maize and corn-cob mix.

In 2018, the four EU regions with the highest levels of harvested production of grain maize and corn-cob-mix were all located in Romania; 3.7 million tonnes of output was recorded in Sud-Muntenia, closely followed by Sud-Est (3.6 million tonnes), while lower levels of output were recorded in Nord-Est (3.2 million tonnes) and Vest (2.6 million tonnes). Two other regions in Romania — Sud-Vest Oltenia and Nord-Vest — were also among the 10 EU regions with the highest levels of production (see Figure 3). They were joined by single regions from France (Aquitaine), Croatia (Kontinentalna Hrvatska), Hungary (Dél-Dunántúl) and Italy (Lombardia; 2016 data). The three Romanian regions with the highest levels of production also recorded the largest cultivated areas for grain maize and corn-cob-mix: more than 4 500 km² in each of Sud-Muntenia, Sud-Est and Nord-Est.

Figure 3: Top regions in the EU for the production of grain maize and corn-cob-mix, 2018
(by NUTS 2 regions)
Source: Eurostat (apro_cpshr)

Bovine animals and milk

In December 2018, pigs were the most commonly reared animals in the EU-27 (143.5 million head), followed by bovine animals (77.8 million head), sheep (an estimated 63.0 million head) and goats (an estimated 12.2 million head). The total livestock population for these four types of animals in the EU-27 was 297 million head.

Several EU Member States have clear livestock rearing specialisations that were common to most or even all of their regions. For example, this was the case for goats in Greece, or pigs in Denmark. This section focuses on bovine animals: in relative terms, Czechia, Lithuania, Slovenia and Sweden were all specialised in rearing these animals.

Livestock: number of bovine animals

The information presented in Map 3 details the number of bovine animals across NUTS level 2 regions. When considering these livestock populations it should be remembered that some regions are larger than others in terms of their area and that data for Germany are shown for more aggregated (NUTS level 1) regions.

In December 2018, there were 19 regions (out of 218 for which data are available) where the count of bovine animals was higher than one million head. Most of these regions were located in an arc that ran from Ireland through France and Germany and finished in Poland. Many of them are characterised by a temperate climate, relatively high levels of rainfall and sparsely populated areas that provide enough space for grazing pasture.

Southern (Ireland) had the highest count of bovine animals, at 3.5 million head

Southern (Ireland) had the highest regional count of bovine animals in the EU, at 3.5 million head in December 2018. The other two regions of Ireland — Northern and Western and Eastern and Midland — also recorded more than one million head. Note that the count of bovine animals in Southern and in Northern and Western was higher than their respective number of inhabitants.

Elsewhere, there were seven regions in France that surpassed one million head of bovine animals, with the highest counts recorded in the north-western regions of Pays de la Loire (2.4 million head) and Bretagne (2.0 million head). In Germany, there were four (NUTS level 1) regions with more than one million head of bovine animals: the highest counts were recorded in the southern region of Bayern (3.1 million head) and the north-western region of Niedersachsen (2.5 million head). Away from Ireland, France and Germany, there were five other regions across the EU with more than one million head of bovine animals. Three of these were located in a band running through central Poland — Mazowiecki regionalny, Wielkopolskie and Podlaskie — while the others were Lombardia in northern Italy and Castilla y León in north-western Spain.

Map 3: Number of bovine animals, December 2018
(thousand head of livestock, by NUTS 2 regions)
Source: Eurostat (agr_r_animal) and (apro_mt_lscatl)

Milk production

Cows’ milk production is generally high in regions characterised by a temperate climate and a relatively high degree of rainfall. These conditions are ideal for lush dairy pasture and arable land given over to fodder crops (grass, clover and other legumes, fodder cereals) some of which may be stored as winter feed.

EU-27 production of cows’ milk was 151 million tonnes in 2018. In general, cows’ milk production was relatively high in many of the regions with the highest numbers of bovine animals. This encompassed an arc of regions running from Ireland in the west to Poland in the east, although there was also a relatively high quantity of milk production in Denmark, northern Italy, the Netherlands, and some Alpine regions. Dairy cow farming tended to be relatively uncommon in regions where grassland was scarcer (for example, around the Mediterranean or in south-eastern parts of the EU).

EU-27 production of cows’ milk increased overall by 2.6 % between 2015 and 2018

On 1 April 2015, dairy quotas were abolished in the EU. This major change to the EU’s farming sector allowed farmers the flexibility to expand their production and (potentially) to profit from the growing external demand for EU milk products. However, although limiting the amount of milk that was produced on EU farms, the quota system did provide protection to farmers, through price stability and a minimum income.

Map 4 analyses changes in cows’ milk production during the period 2015 to 2018. Milk production in the EU-27 rose overall by 2.6 %, with contrasting developments at a regional level. Almost one quarter of EU regions (55 out of 238 for which data are available) recorded an increase of at least 7.5 % in their level of cows’ milk production between 2015 and 2018. By contrast, almost one fifth of EU regions (46) recorded a decline of more than 7.5 % during the same period.

Some EU Member States recorded a relatively homogeneous development, for example, the level of cows’ milk production rose in every region of Ireland and the Netherlands during the period under consideration. This was also the case for the vast majority of regions within a band that ran from north-east Poland down through all of Czechia, the Alps and into northern Italy.

The situation was quite different in Belgium, Germany and France, where there were considerable regional variations. For example, while there was a marked expansion of milk production in the five regions that compose Vlaams Gewest (overall growth of 18.8-21.8 %), output fell across the five regions that make up Région wallonne (overall declines of 5.6-10.9 %). More generally, the production of cows’ milk declined in a band of regions running from Finland down through northern Germany and into much of France; there were also reduced levels of output in most south-eastern regions of the EU.

Map 4: Cows' milk production, 2018
(thousand tonnes and % change compared with 2015, by NUTS 2 regions)
Source: Eurostat (agr_r_milkpr) and (apro_mk_farm)

Southern (Ireland) and Bretagne (France) were the only regions in the EU to record more than 5.0 million tonnes of cows’ milk production

There were 18 NUTS level 2 regions in the EU-27 where cows’ milk production reached 2.0 million or more tonnes in 2018. Together these regions (denoted by the largest circles in Map 4) accounted for almost two fifths (38 %) of the milk produced in the EU-27. The highest levels of production were recorded in Southern (Ireland; 5.7 million tonnes), Bretagne (France; 5.6 million tonnes) and Lombardia (Italy; 4.9 million tonnes).

Among the 18 regions with the highest levels of cows’ milk production there were six where milk production increased at a rapid pace (overall growth of at least 7.5 % between 2015 and 2018), thereby consolidating their position among the leading producers of cows’ milk in the EU. They were: Southern (Ireland), Podlaskie, Makroregion Województwo Mazowieckie (both Poland; note the latter is a NUTS level 1 region), Lombardia (Italy), Lüneburg (Germany) and Friesland (the Netherlands).

Figure 4 summarises the NUTS level 2 regions in the EU with the highest levels of cows’ milk production in 2018, as well as those regions with the highest relative and absolute increases in production between 2015 and 2018. Note that the information presented has been filtered to include only those regions attaining a threshold of at least 50 000 tonnes of production in 2018. The highest relative increases in cows’ milk production were recorded in four Italian regions: Liguria, Valle d’Aosta/Vallée d’Aoste, Abruzzo and Basilicata. All four of these regions had relatively low levels of cows’ milk production, with output highest in Liguria (111 000 tonnes). In absolute terms, the biggest increase in cows’ milk production was recorded in Southern (Ireland) — the region with the highest level of output — as its production rose by almost 870 000 tonnes (or 18.1 %). The next highest increases were recorded in Lombardia and Podlaskie, where the output of cows’ milk increased by almost 410 000 tonnes (or 9.1 %) and by almost 280 000 tonnes (or 10.5 %) respectively.

Figure 4: Top regions in the EU for cows' milk production
(by NUTS 2 regions)
Source: Eurostat (agr_r_milkpr) and (apro_mk_farm)

Area under organic farming

Intensive farming can have a considerable environmental impact. Among other impacts, it can lead to an increase in greenhouse gas emissions or soil erosion, or result in habitat and biodiversity loss, deforestation or contaminated waters.

EU regulations on organic farming are designed to provide a clear structure for the production of organic goods. Consumers are increasingly aware of provenance and farming methods: this may explain, at least in part, why a growing proportion of EU farmers have adopted organic farming methods. In 2016, the EU-27’s organic area covered 11.4 million hectares, which corresponded to a 7.1 % share of the total utilised agricultural area. Note the organic area includes the agricultural area fully converted and the agricultural area that is under conversion.

The share of the utilised agricultural area that was under organic farming varied considerably between EU Member States and between regions. Out of 233 regions for which data are available, there were 35 where in 2016 the area under organic farming represented at least 15.0 % of the total (as shown by the darkest shade in Map 5); note that the statistics presented for Közép-Magyarország (Hungary) and Makroregion Województwo Mazowieckie (Poland) relate to NUTS level 1 regions. There were extensive areas of agricultural land given over to organic farming methods in Austria, Sweden, Estonia, and to a somewhat lesser degree, Czechia and Italy. By contrast, organic farming was much less common in Ireland (only national data) and Malta, as well as in several regions of Belgium, Spain, Poland and Romania.

Salzburg (Austria) was the only region in the EU where organic farming accounted for more than half of the total utilised agricultural area

The highest share of organic farming was recorded in Salzburg (Austria). It was the only region in the EU to report that more than half (51.8 %) of its utilised agricultural area in 2016 was under organic farming, some 93 000 hectares. The next highest shares — all within the range of 29.3-29.6 % — were recorded in Severozápad (Czechia), Norra Mellansverige (Sweden) and Calabria (Italy). Among the 35 regions where the area under organic farming represented at least 15.0 % of the total utilised agricultural area, the largest areas under organic farming were in: Sicilia (Italy; 375 000 hectares), Puglia (also Italy; 194 000 hectares) and Estonia (181 000 hectares).

Map 5: Area under organic farming, 2016
(%, relative to utilised agricultural area
(UAA), by NUTS 2 regions)
Source: Eurostat (ef_lus_main) and (org_cropar)

Source data for figures and maps

Excel.jpg Agriculture at regional level

Data sources

An agricultural census is carried out every 10 years by EU Member States. The most recent for which results are available was conducted in 2010, while the 2020 census is in the process of being conducted. Between census years, there are two farm structure surveys (FSS), the most recent of which was conducted in 2016; these are the principal sources of structural agricultural statistics. In the census and FSS, EU Member States collect information from individual agricultural holdings covering: the use of agricultural land; livestock numbers; rural development (for example, activities other than agriculture); management and farm labour input (including age, sex and relationship to the holder).

The legal basis for farm structure surveys is provided by a lengthy list of survey-specific implementing regulations and decisions that cover aspects such as survey organisation, characteristics, definitions and typologies. For example, European Commission Regulation (EU) No 715/2014, which amended Regulation (EC) No 1166/2008 of the European Parliament and of the Council on farm structure surveys and the survey on agricultural production methods, covers a list of characteristics to be collected in the 2016 FSS. Note that these legislative documents are no longer in force and that new legislation has been enacted for future farm structure surveys and the agricultural census of 2020 (see Regulation (EU) 2018/1091 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 18 July 2018 on integrated farm statistics). Thresholds used for the farm structure survey are generally set so as to include farms with a utilised agricultural area over one hectare, although thresholds are raised to two hectares for Slovakia, three hectares for Luxembourg, and five hectares for Czechia, Denmark and Germany.

The legal basis for crop statistics is Regulation (EC) No 543/2009 which was amended by Regulation (EU) No 1350/2013 of the European Parliament and of the Council and Commission Delegated Regulation (EU) No 1557/2015.

The legal basis for livestock statistics is Regulation (EC) No 1165/2008, as amended by Regulation (EU) No 1350/2013 of the European Parliament and of the Council. Milk and milk product statistics are collected under Decision 97/80/EC implementing Directive 96/16/EC on statistical surveys of milk and milk products, which was amended by Directive 2003/107/EC.

Organic farming differs from other agricultural production methods in the application of regulated standards (production rules), compulsory control schemes and a specific labelling scheme. Data are collected on the crop area under organic production (fully converted area) and under conversion, which may be divided by the total utilised agricultural area to analyse the relative importance of organic farming. Data in this annual collection originate from the administrative data of national entities in charge of the certification of operators involved in the organic sector. Since the 2008 reference year, data have been delivered according to Commission Regulation (EC) No 889/2008, implementing Council Regulation (EC) No 834/2007.

More information at: https://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/cache/metadata/en/org_esms.htm.

Context

The common agricultural policy (CAP) is one of the EU’s oldest policies, supporting farmers and ensuring Europe’s food security. It aims to:

  • support farmers and improve agricultural productivity, so that consumers have a stable supply of affordable food;
  • ensure that EU farmers can make a reasonable living;
  • help tackle climate change and the sustainable management of natural resources;
  • maintain rural areas and landscapes across the EU;
  • keep the rural economy alive promoting jobs in farming, agri-foods industries and associated sectors.

The CAP is a common policy for all the Member States of the EU. It is managed for the EU as a whole and funded from the resources of the EU’s budget.

The CAP takes action in three ways:

  • income support — direct payments ensure income stability, and remunerate farmers for environmentally friendly farming and delivering public goods not normally paid for by the markets, such as taking care of the countryside;
  • market measures — the EU can take measures to deal with difficult market situations such as a sudden drop in demand due to a health scare, or a fall in prices as a result of a temporary oversupply;
  • rural development measures — national and regional programmes address the specific needs and challenges facing rural areas.

The current CAP programming period finishes in 2020. The European Commission has made a proposal to reform the CAP (COM(2018) 0322, 0392, 0393 and 0394). Under these plans, the future CAP would continue to ensure access to high-quality food and strong support for the EU’s farming model with an increased focus on the environment and climate, supporting the transition towards a more sustainable agricultural sector and the development of vibrant rural areas.

The nine objectives proposed for the future CAP are:

  • to ensure a fair income to farmers;
  • to increase competitiveness;
  • to rebalance the power in the food chain;
  • climate change action;
  • environmental care;
  • to preserve landscapes and biodiversity;
  • to support generational renewal;
  • vibrant rural areas;
  • to protect food and health quality.

The European Commission’s proposals aim for a more flexible system, simplifying and modernising the way the CAP works for farmers and society at large. The proposed policy would shift the emphasis from compliance and rules towards results and performance. Furthermore, it would give more freedom to EU Member States, for example to decide on the way to meet common objectives set for the EU while responding to the specific needs of their farmers and rural communities.

Discussions in the European Parliament and Council concerning the proposals for the reformed CAP started in 2018. It is planned that the reformed CAP will be in force from 2021 onwards.

The EU’s Farm to Fork Strategy (COM(2020) 381 final) seeks to redesign food systems so they are fair, healthy and environmentally-friendly. It addresses the challenges of sustainable food systems and recognises the inextricable links between healthy people, healthy societies and a healthy planet. The strategy aims to put food systems on a sustainable path by, among others: having a neutral or positive environmental impact; helping to mitigate climate change; reversing the loss of biodiversity; ensuring food security, nutrition and public health; preserving affordability of food while generating fairer economic returns and promoting fair trade. It is hoped that by creating a favourable food environment it will become easier for consumers to choose healthy and sustainable diets that will benefit their health and quality of life. The strategy includes a number of proposed targets to transform food systems in the EU, among which: a 50 % reduction in the use of pesticides; a 20 % reduction in the use of fertilisers; a 50 % reduction in sales of macrobiotics; at least 25 % of the EU’s agricultural land under organic farming.

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Regional agriculture statistics (t_reg_agr)
Animal populations by NUTS 2 regions (tgs00045)
Production of cow’s milk on farms by NUTS 2 regions (tgs00046)
Agricultural production (t_apro)
Milk and milk products (t_apro_mk)
Production of cow’s milk on farms by NUTS 2 regions (tgs00046)
Livestock and meat (t_apro_mt)
Animal populations by NUTS 2 regions (tgs00045)


Regional agriculture statistics (reg_agr)
Agricultural production (reg_apro)
Animal populations by NUTS 2 regions (agr_animal)
Production of cow’s milk on farms by NUTS 2 regions (agr_r_accts)
Farm structure (ef)
Main farm indicators by NUTS 2 regions (ef_mainfarm)
Farm indicators by agricultural area, type of farm, standard output, sex and age of the manager and NUTS 2 regions (ef_m_farmang)
Agricultural production (apro)
Crops (apro_crop)
Crop production (apro_cp)
Crop production in national humidity by NUTS 2 regions (apro_cpnhr)
Animal production (apro_anip)
Milk and milk products (apro_mk)
Production of cow’s milk on farms by NUTS 2 regions (agr_r_milkpr)
Livestock and meat (apro_mt)
Livestock (apro_mt_ls)
Bovine population - annual data (apro_mt_lscatl)
Organic farming (org)
Organic crop area by agricultural production methods and crops (from 2012 onwards) (org_cropar)


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Maps can be explored interactively using Eurostat’s statistical atlas (see user manual).

This article forms part of Eurostat’s annual flagship publication, the Eurostat regional yearbook.