Migrant integration statistics - education


Data extracted in May 2019.

Planned article update: May 2020.

Highlights

In 2018, more than half of the foreign-born core working-age populations of Bulgaria, Poland, Ireland, Luxembourg and the United Kingdom had attained a tertiary level of educational attainment.

People born outside the EU recorded higher participation rates in adult learning than their native born peers in Ireland, Poland, Finland, Hungary, United Kingdom, Portugal, Belgium, Netherlands, Germany, Sweden and Cyprus in 2018.

In the United Kingdom, Ireland, Luxembourg and Denmark the share of young native-born people who were early leavers from education and training was higher than the share for foreign-born people in 2018.

Development of the share of young people aged 15-29 neither in employment nor in education and training, EU-28, 2008-2018

This article presents EU statistics for a range of education indicators, contrasting the situation of migrants with the native population; the information may be used as part of an on-going process to monitor and evaluate migrant integration policies. The indicators presented are based on: a set of Council conclusions from 2010 on migrant integration; a subsequent study Indicators of immigrant integration — a pilot study from 2011; and a report titled Using EU indicators of immigrant integration from 2013. The article analyses information from the list of Zaragoza indicators that were agreed by EU Member States in Zaragoza (Spain) in April 2010, alongside additional information derived from the 2013 report on migrant integration. More specifically, it presents statistical data on the following:


This article forms part of an online Eurostat publication — Migrant integration statistics.


Full article

Educational attainment

In 2018, the share of non-EU-born persons aged 25-54 with at most a lower secondary level of educational attainment was twice as high as the share observed among their native-born peers

An analysis for the EU-28 population aged 25-54 (hereafter referred to as the core working-age), shows that in 2018 just over one third (34.8 %) of non-EU-born persons (hereafter referred to as persons born outside the EU) had successfully completed at most a lower secondary level of education (ISCED levels 0-2); this figure was 0.6 percentage points lower than a year before, and 3.9 points lower than in 2008.

In 2018, the share of EU-born (in other words, those born in another EU Member State from the one where they were living) core working-age population with at most a lower secondary level of educational attainment stood at 21.3 % (which was 4.8 percentage points lower than in 2008). This was a somewhat higher share than the 17.4 % recorded for native-born individuals residing in their Member State of birth; the latter share was 6.5 points lower than in 2008. As such, the share of the EU-28 core working-age population born outside the EU with at most a lower secondary level of educational attainment was twice as high as the share among those living in their Member State of birth.

There was little difference in general developments (between 2008 and 2018) across the EU-28 concerning the share of the core working-age population with at most a lower secondary level of educational attainment when comparing the results by country of birth and by citizenship (see Figure 1). Nevertheless, while the developments were similar, the share of core working-age migrants with at most a lower secondary level of educational attainment who were not EU citizens was notably higher than the share among those born outside of the EU (respectively 41.9 % and 34.8 %). This suggests that there are groups of people who were particularly likely to have at most a lower secondary level of educational attainment, including:persons born outside of the EU who did not become EU citizens (either citizens of the Member State where they were residing or citizens of another EU Member State); and people born within an EU Member State who were not a citizen of an EU Member State. The remainder of this section concentrates on presenting more detailed results by country of birth.

Figure 1: Development of the share of the population aged 25-54 years with at most a lower secondary level of educational attainment, EU-28, 2008-2018
(%)
Source: Eurostat (edat_lfs_9912) and (edat_lfs_9911)
Figure 2 extends this analysis by presenting two additional levels of educational attainment, those of upper secondary and post-secondary non-tertiary education (ISCED levels 3 and 4) and tertiary education (ISCED levels 5-8). At the top end of the education spectrum, just over one third (35.6 %) of the EU-28 core working-age population living in 2018 in their Member State of birth had attained a tertiary level of education. However, a slightly higher share (37.0 %) was recorded among the population of core working-age who were born elsewhere in the EU, suggesting that this cohort was more likely to move to another EU Member State (possibly related to different employment opportunities) than those with lower educational attainment. A 31.2 % share of core working-age persons who were born outside the EU possessed a tertiary level of educational attainment in 2018 (some 4.4 percentage points below the average for the native-born population).
Figure 2: Analysis of the population aged 25-54 years, by educational attainment level and country of birth, EU-28, 2018
(%)
Source: Eurostat (edat_lfs_9912)

In the 25-54 age group, for all three population subgroups analysed the proportion of tertiary graduates was higher among women than among men

In 2018, the share of core working-age women with a tertiary level of educational attainment was consistently higher (than the share for men) across all three population subgroups detailed in Figure 3. The biggest gender gap between the sexes was recorded for the native-born core working-age population, where the share of women with a tertiary level of education stood at 39.0 % compared with 32.2 % for men (a gap of 6.8 percentage points), while the difference between the sexes was 5.6 points among persons born elsewhere in the EU and 2.4 points among persons born outside the EU. These shares were reversed for the two lower groups of levels of educational attainment, with a higher proportion of core working-age men (than women) possessing an upper secondary or post-secondary non-tertiary level of education or at most a lower secondary level of education; this pattern held across all three population subgroups (native-born, born elsewhere in the EU and born outside the EU).

Figure 3: Share of the population aged 25-54 years, by educational attainment level, country of birth and sex, EU-28, 2018
(%)
Source: Eurostat (edat_lfs_9912)

Across the whole of the EU-28, less than one fifth (17.4 %) of the core working-age population living in their Member State of birth possessed at most a lower secondary level of education in 2018 (see Figure 4), while the corresponding share among foreign-born population of core working-age was 30.4 %.

In 2018, Italy (48.7 %), Spain (39.7 %) and Greece (39.1 %) had the highest proportions of foreign-born persons with low educational attainment, although in Italy and Spain a relatively high share of their native-born core working-age population also had at most a lower secondary level of educational attainment.

The gap for the EU-28 between the share of the foreign-born and native-born core working-age populations with at most a lower secondary level of educational attainment was 13.0 percentage points in 2018 (a higher share being recorded for the foreign-born population). This pattern was repeated in 17 of the 24 EU Member States for which data are available (incomplete data for Bulgaria, Poland, Romania and Slovakia), with the share of the foreign-born population having at most a lower secondary level of educational attainment at least 20 points higher than the share for the native-born population in Greece, France, Sweden and Germany. By contrast, there were seven Member States where a higher share of the native-born (rather than foreign-born) population had at most a lower secondary level of educational attainment: Lithuania (where the gap was 1.0 points), the United Kingdom (4.0 points), Latvia (4.2 points), Estonia (5.0 points), Ireland (6.7 points), Malta (12.9 points) and Portugal (14.4 points).

Figure 4: Share of the population aged 25-54 years with at most a lower secondary level of educational attainment, by country of birth, 2018
(%)
Source: Eurostat (edat_lfs_9912)

Figure 5 presents similar information at the other end of the education spectrum, concerning the share of the core working-age population with a tertiary level of educational attainment. In 2018, there was little difference between the proportion of native-born (35.6 %) and foreign-born (33.1 %) core working-age populations in the EU-28 with a tertiary level of educational attainment. Among the EU Member States, there were 15 where a lower share of the foreign-born population (compared with the native-born population) had a tertiary level of educational attainment, while there were 12 Member States where a higher share of the foreign-born population had a tertiary level of educational attainment (incomplete data for Romania). Among the Member States where the native-born population had a higher share, the largest gaps in attainment — where the share of the native-born population with a tertiary level of educational attainment was at least 15 percentage points higher than that recorded among the foreign-born population — were recorded in Spain, Slovenia, Finland and Greece.

In 2018, more than half of the foreign-born core working-age populations of Bulgaria, Poland, Ireland, Luxembourg and the United Kingdom had attained a tertiary level of educational attainment. In each case, the difference in tertiary educational attainment between their foreign-born and native-born populations was at least 8 percentage points (in favour of the foreign-born population), indicating that these five Member States attracted not only a proportionally high share of highly-educated foreign-born persons but also a share that was higher than in their native-born population (note these statistics do not provide any information concerning the roles or occupations that their highly-educated workforces carried out). By contrast, Cyprus was the only EU Member State that reported that more than half of its native-born core working-age population in 2018 had attained a tertiary level of educational attainment. After Cyprus (51.4 %), the next highest shares of the native-born population with a tertiary level of educational attainment were recorded in Ireland (48.6 %) and Finland (47.9 %).

Figure 5: Share of the population aged 25-54 years with a tertiary level of educational attainment, by country of birth, 2018
(%)
Source: Eurostat (edat_lfs_9912)

The analysis presented in Figure 6 focuses on the educational attainment of the core working-age population exclusively born outside of the EU; it can therefore be contrasted with Figure 5 which provided more aggregated figures for all foreign-born populations (people born in another EU Member State or born outside the EU). The educational attainment of this subpopulation was relatively evenly distributed, as 34.8 % of persons born outside the EU possessed at most a lower secondary level of education, while slightly smaller shares had attained an upper secondary or post-secondary non-tertiary education (34.0 %) or a tertiary education (31.2 %).

In 2018, more than half of the core working-age population born outside the EU and living in Ireland, Bulgaria, Poland, the United Kingdom and Slovakia had a tertiary level of educational attainment, this share peaking in Ireland at 67.9 %. By contrast, in Greece, Italy, Slovenia and Croatia, less than one fifth of persons born outside the EU had a tertiary level of educational attainment.

Figure 6: Analysis of the population born outside the EU and aged 25-54 years, by educational attainment level, 2018
(%)
Source: Eurostat (edat_lfs_9912)

Share of 30-34 year-olds with a tertiary level of educational attainment

Some 41.7 % of 30-34 year-old persons born in another EU Member State had completed a tertiary level of educational attainment

The next analysis focuses on a much narrower age range, namely persons aged 30-34 years. One of the objectives of the strategic framework for European cooperation in education and training and the Europe 2020 strategy is to ensure that the proportion of 30-34 year-olds with a tertiary level of educational attainment should reach at least 40 % by 2020; note that some of those currently within this age cohort will no longer be represented in the target age group by 2020 (as they will be older than 34). This target was achieved in 2018, when the share for the whole population of this age group reached 40.7 %, rising 0.8 percentage points compared with 2017.

Figure 7 shows that, in 2018, some 41.3 % of the native-born population aged 30-34 in the EU-28 had attained a tertiary level of education. A slightly higher share (41.7 %) of the population aged 30-34 and born in another EU Member State had a tertiary level of educational attainment, while the equivalent share among persons born outside the EU was above one third (35.8 %).

Information on national targets for tertiary educational attainment within the Europe 2020 strategy is also provided in Figure 7. In 16 out of the 27 EU Member States (there is no national target for the United Kingdom), the share of the native-born population aged 30-34 with a tertiary level of educational attainment was above the national Europe 2020 target. The same national targets had already been surpassed in 10 (from 19 with data available) Member States for persons born in another EU Member State and for 9 (from 24 with data available) Member States for persons born outside the EU.

The share of the population aged 30-34 and born in another EU Member State with a tertiary level of educational attainment was just over 50 % in the United Kingdom and Ireland, rising to 54.5 % in Belgium, 55.8 % in Malta, 60.0 % in Luxembourg, 63.8 % in Denmark and peaking at 65.2 % in Sweden. A similar analysis for persons born outside the EU reveals that the highest shares of the population aged 30-34 with a tertiary level of educational attainment were recorded in the United Kingdom (60.2 %), Hungary (60.7 %), Poland (67.0 %), Ireland (72.2 %) and Estonia (74.4 %).

Figure 7: Share of the population aged 30-34 years with a tertiary level of educational attainment, by country of birth, 2018
(%)
Source: Eurostat (edat_lfs_9912) and Europe 2020 Targets

Adult participation in learning

When compared with the native-born core working-age population, a slightly higher share of the foreign-born population participated in adult learning

The participation rate in adult learning is expressed as the percentage of people who received education or training (formal or non-formal) during the four weeks preceding the labour force survey. Figure 8 presents overall developments for the EU-28 during the period covering 2008-2018 for those aged 25-54. During this period there was an increase in the share of the native-born core working-age population participating in adult learning; the change was almost entirely attributed to a sudden change in 2013 and it should be noted that there is a break in series for France in 2013, which impacts on the results presented for the EU-28. There was almost no overall change in the share of the core working-age populations who participated in education and training between 2008 and 2018: the share for persons born in another EU Member State fell by 0.2 percentage points (with no change between 2017 and 2018), while the share for persons born outside the EU rose by 0.3 points (with an increase of 0.2 points in 2018 compared with 2017).

The second part of Figure 8 provides similar information, although the analysis is by citizenship rather than by country of birth. The share of EU-28 core working-age nationals who participated in adult learning jumped in 2013, after which it remained relatively stable; again there is a break in series in 2013. By contrast, the proportion of core working-age EU citizens (other than nationals) who participated in education or training rose was stable until the break in series in 2013 and then declined between 2016 and 2017. The share of non-EU citizens who participated in education or training was somewhat higher in 2018 than it had been in 2008, due mainly to an increase of 1.3 percentage points in 2017 compared with 2016 followed by a smaller increase (up 0.2 points) in 2018.

Figure 8: Development of the share of the population aged 25-54 years participating in adult learning, EU-28, 2008-2018
(%)
Source: Eurostat (trng_lfs_13) and (trng_lfs_12)

In 2018, there was little difference in the share of the EU-28 core working-age population that participated in adult learning when analysed by country of birth (Figure 9). The proportion of the native-born population who received education or training was 12.6 %, which was slightly higher than the participation rate recorded for persons born in another EU Member State (11.1 %), but somewhat lower than the rate for persons born outside the EU (13.2 %).

The Nordic Member States reported the highest participation rates for adult learning, regardless of where their respective workforces were born, with around three tenths of the core working-age population participating in adult learning in 2018 in Finland and Sweden and around a quarter in Denmark. In the majority of the EU Member States for which data are available, it was common to find that the highest participation rates were recorded among the native-born core working-age population. However, there were some exceptions where a higher proportion of foreign-born populations (compared with native-born) participated in adult learning. People born in another EU Member State recorded the highest participation rates for adult learning in Czechia, while those born outside the EU recorded the highest rates in Finland, Sweden, the Netherlands, Ireland, the United Kingdom, Portugal, Poland, Germany, Hungary and Cyprus. In Belgium, people born in another EU Member State and those born outside the EU were equally likely to have participated in adult learning (and both these shares were higher than for the native-born core working-age population). Note that participation in language courses and other integration-focused learning activities are included in the concept of adult learning.

Figure 9: Share of the population aged 25-54 years participating in adult learning, by country of birth, 2018
(%)
Source: Eurostat (trng_lfs_13)

Share of early leavers from education and training

Young persons who were foreign-born were at greater risk of leaving education and training early than their native-born peers

Early leavers from education and training are defined as the percentage of the population aged 18-24 having attained at most a lower secondary level of educational attainment and who did not participate in further (formal or non-formal) education or training in the four weeks preceding the labour force survey.

As shown in Figure 10, young persons who were foreign-born or foreign citizens were generally at greater risk of leaving education without having completed more than a lower secondary level of education. The share of EU-28 early leavers from education and training by country of birth and by citizenship generally followed a downward path during the period covering 2008-2018, although shares for people born in another EU Member State and citizens of other EU Member States rose in 2016, 2017 and 2018, as did the shares for people born outside the EU and non-EU citizens in 2018. The proportion of persons born outside the EU who were early leavers from education and training fell at a faster pace than the reductions recorded for the native-born population, although the share of early leavers among the native-born population remained much lower than the shares recorded for foreign-born persons and in 2016 fell below the 10 % target set as part of the strategic framework for education and training (ET 2020) and Europe 2020 strategies.

Figure 10: Development of the share of early leavers aged 18-24 years from education and training, EU-28, 2008-2018
(%)
Source: Eurostat (edat_lfse_02) and (edat_lfse_01)

In 2018, among the 19 EU Member States for which data are available, the highest shares of foreign-born early leavers from education and training were found in Italy (35.2 %), Spain (32.0 %) and Germany (24.1 %). By contrast, the proportion of early leavers from education and training was in single digits among the foreign-born populations aged 18-24 in Ireland (3.4 %), Luxembourg (6.0 %), Czechia (7.6 %), the United Kingdom (8.9 %) and Denmark (9.9 %).

The largest differences between the shares of foreign-born and native-born early leavers from education and training (with higher shares for foreign-born populations) were recorded in Italy (23.2 percentage points), Spain (17.1 points) and Germany (16.0 points), while Greece, Belgium, Austria and Sweden also recorded double digit differences (Figure 11). There were four EU Member States where the share of early leavers was higher among the native-born population than it was among the foreign-born population: native-born early leavers (11.0 %) were more common than foreign-born early leavers (8.9 %) in the United Kingdom, in Ireland (5.4 % compared with 3.4 %), in Luxembourg (6.5 % compared with 6.0 %) and in Denmark (10.2 % compared with 9.9 %).

Figure 11: Share of early leavers aged 18-24 years from education and training, 2018
(%)
Source: Eurostat (edat_lfse_02)

Young people not in employment, education or training (NEET)

The share of young people neither in employment nor in education and training was higher among persons born outside the EU

The indicator for young people neither in employment nor in education and training (NEET) corresponds to the percentage of the population of a given age group (in this case aged 15-29) who are not employed and not involved in further education or training. In 2018, just under one in eight of the EU-28 native-born population aged 15-29 could be described as NEET, whereas higher shares were recorded among foreign-born populations and foreign citizens, in particular for those who were born outside the EU and those who were non-EU citizens.

Figure 12 shows the development of NEET rates by country of birth and by citizenship. Irrespective of these two characteristics, there was a general pattern insofar as the share of NEETs tended to rise in the aftermath of the global financial and economic crisis, peaking in 2012 and/or 2013, before falling at a relatively fast pace through to 2018. In 2018, the NEET rate for young people aged 15-29 in the EU-28 was 12.1 % among the native-born population, while the rates for young people born in another EU Member State (14.7 %) and those born outside the EU (21.6 %) were higher.

Figure 12: Development of the share of young people aged 15-29 years neither in employment nor in education and training, EU-28, 2008-2018
(%)
Source: Eurostat (edat_lfse_28) and (edat_lfse_23)

Subject to data availability, the highest NEET rates among the native-born populations of the EU Member States were recorded in Italy, Greece, Bulgaria and Romania. Indeed, Italy recorded the highest NEET rates for two of the three groups of young people, with a NEET rate for the native-born population of 22.0 % and a NEET rate of 32.5 % for young people born in another EU Member State (Figure 13). Greece recorded the highest NEET rate (37.4 %) for young people born outside the EU, while Italy recorded the second highest rate (34.1 %). Spain also recorded a high share of its young EU-born populations being neither in employment nor in education and training, as did France, Spain, Belgium and Slovenia for young people born outside of the EU.

NEET rates were generally lower for young native-born (rather than foreign-born) populations in 2018. This pattern held for the majority of the EU Member States for which data are available, the only exceptions being the United Kingdom and Cyprus: for the former, the NEET rate for the native-born population aged 15-29 was 1.3 percentage points higher than that for young people born in another EU Member State, while the difference between these two shares in Cyprus was 0.1 points. The highest NEET rates for young people aged 15-29 were usually recorded for people born outside the EU, the only exception being in Ireland, where the NEET rate for those born outside the EU was somewhat lower (1.1 points) than the rate recorded for young people born in another EU Member State.

Figure 13: Young people aged 15-29 years neither in employment nor in education and training, by country of birth, 2018
(%)
Source: Eurostat (edat_lfse_28)

Source data for tables and graphs

Data sources

The main data source for educational attainment statistics is the EU labour force survey (EU-LFS). The EU-LFS is a quarterly sample survey that covers the resident population aged 15 years and above in private households; it provides data for the EU Member States, EFTA (except Liechtenstein) and candidate countries. The survey is designed to provide population estimates for a set of main labour market characteristics, covering areas such as employment, unemployment, economic inactivity and hours of work, as well as providing analyses for a range of socio-demographic characteristics, such as sex, age, educational attainment, occupation, household characteristics and region of residence.

A set of Council, European Parliament and European Commission regulations define how the EU-LFS is carried out, while some countries have their own national legislation for the implementation of the survey. The key advantage of using EU-LFS data is that they come from a survey which is highly harmonised and optimised for comparability. However, there are some limitations when considering the coverage of the EU-LFS for migrant populations, as the EU-LFS was designed to target the whole resident population and not specific subgroups, such as migrants. The following issues should be noted when analysing migrant integration statistics:

  • recently arrived migrants — this group of migrants is missing from the sampling frame in every host EU Member State, which results in under-coverage of the actual migrant population for EU-LFS statistics;
  • non-response — one disadvantage of the EU-LFS is the high percentage of non-response that is recorded among migrant populations, this may reflect: language difficulties; misunderstanding concerning the purpose of the survey; difficulties in communicating with the survey interviewer; or fear concerning the negative impact that participation in the survey could have (for example, damaging a migrants chances of receiving the necessary authorisation to remain in the host Member State);
  • sample size — given the EU-LFS is a sample survey, it is possible that some of the results presented for labour market characteristics of migrants are unrepresentative, especially in those EU Member States with small migrant populations (note that for cases where data are considered to be of particularly low reliability, statistics are not published).

This article focuses on comparisons between national and migrant populations. The results for the migrant population are usually disaggregated into migrants from other EU Member States and migrants from outside the EU, with information presented by age and by sex. Migrant indicators are calculated for two broad groups: the foreign population determined by country of birth and the foreign population determined by citizenship. Although providing some main indicators for the latter, this article focuses on information for migrant integration by country of birth (this subgroup of the population is generally somewhat larger and therefore allows a more complete and robust data set to be presented). That said, results by country of birth are generally representative of those by citizenship.

The following analyses are presented:

For the population by country of birth

  • Native-born — the population born in the reporting country;
  • Foreign-born — the population born outside the reporting country; subdivided into:
    • EU-born — the population born in the EU, except the reporting country; and
    • Non-EU-born — the population born in non-EU countries.

For the population by citizenship

  • Nationals — the population of citizens of the reporting country;
  • Foreign citizens — the non-nationals; subdivided into:
    • EU citizens — the citizens of EU Member States, except the reporting country;
    • Non-EU citizens — the citizens of non-EU countries.

For the population by age

  • 18-24 and 15-29 years — these age cohorts represent the youth population;
  • 25-54 years — this cohort is considered as the most appropriate group for an analysis of the situation of core working-age migrants as it minimises the effects of migration related to non-economic reasons (for example, educational studies, training or early retirement), while forming a homogenous group that is large enough to produce reliable results.

The international standard classification of education (ISCED) provides the basis for compiling internationally comparable education statistics. Data by level of education up until 2013 were classified according to ISCED 1997, while data for reference years from 2014 onwards are classified according to ISCED 2011; as a result, there is a break in series in 2014.

Educational attainment is defined in relation to the highest level of education that has been ‘successfully completed’, in other words, a level of education where the pupil/student has obtained a certificate/diploma; in those cases where there is no certification, successful completion must be associated with full attendance on the specified course. Note that data on educational attainment exclude persons who did not answer the EU-LFS question concerning their highest level of education or successfully completed training.

Context

In 2010, the Zaragoza Declaration (and the subsequent Council conclusions) identified a number of common indicators (so-called ‘Zaragoza indicators’) and called upon the European Commission to undertake a pilot study examining proposals for a set of common migrant integration indicators and to report on the availability and quality of data for a range of harmonised sources necessary for the calculation of these indicators. The proposals in the pilot study were examined and developed in a report published by the European Commission’s Directorate-General for Migration and Home Affairs Using EU indicators of immigrant integration.

A European Commission staff working paper EU initiatives supporting the integration of third-country nationals (SEC (2011) 957 final) accompanied the European agenda for the integration of third-country nationals [1] focusing on actions to stimulate levels of economic, social, cultural and political participation among migrants. The agenda highlighted that education is one of the cornerstones of migrant integration in the EU, as it not only has the potential to provide adequate skills to be successful in the labour market but also contributes to the active participation of migrants through the exchange of cultural values. Furthermore, as migrants account for a growing share of the EU’s population, they also play an important role in relation to achieving the overall targets for education as set out in Europe 2020: a strategy for smart, sustainable and inclusive growth (COM(2010) 2020 final) and the EU’s strategic framework for education and training 2020 (ET 2020).

Two of the key targets within the Europe 2020 strategy concern education, namely, to reduce early school leaving rates to below 10 % and to raise the share of 30-34 year-olds who possess a tertiary level of educational attainment to 40 % (the aim is to reach both of these targets by 2020). In addition, ET 2020 foresees: raising the average share of adults (aged 25-64) who participate in learning to at least 15 %; reducing the share of low-achieving 15 year-olds in reading, mathematics and science to less than 15 %; and increasing the share of children participating in early childhood education to at least 95 % (for those aged between four and the compulsory starting age for primary education).

The Justice and Home Affairs Council developed a set of common basic principles for immigrant integration policy in November 2004; they were subsequently reaffirmed by the Council in June 2014 as part of the general framework for the integration of nationals of non-member countries legally residing in the EU. These common principles include many of the key aspects concerned with the integration process, including education, employment, or access to institutions, goods and services. The common basic principles also define integration as a two-way process of mutual accommodation by all migrants and residents in EU Member States.

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Education (mii_educ)
Distribution of the population by educational attainment level (mii_edata)
Early leavers from education and training (mii_edatt1)
Young people by educational and labour status (incl. neither in employment nor in education and training — NEET) (miii_edatt0)
Participation in lifelong learning of population aged 18+ (mii_trng)
Education - regional series (mii_educ_r)

Notes

  1. ‘Third-countries’ is a synonym for non-member countries, in other words countries outside of the EU.