Tourism statistics - annual results for the accommodation sector


Data extracted in October 2018.

Planned article update: October 2019.

Highlights

The number of nights spent in tourist accommodation in the EU continued to grow in 2017 (5.2 %), reaching more than 3.1 billion nights.

German and British tourists accounted for nearly one in three non-resident nights in EU tourist accommodation in 2017.

Trends in nights spent in EU-28 tourist accommodation establishments, EU-28, 2005-2017 (index_2005=100)

This publication focuses on developments in the tourist accommodation sector in the European Union.

Over the period 2005-2017, the number of nights spent in tourist accommodation establishments in the EU grew by 35 %. In particular, there were significant increases in the number of nights spent by non-residents (+ 49 %) while the number of nights spent by residents during domestic trips increased by 25 % .

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Continuous growth in the tourist accommodation sector

Following increases of around 4 % in 2015 and in 2016, the number of nights spent in tourist accommodation in the EU continued to grow in 2017, by 5.2 %, reaching more than 3.1 billion nights (see Figure 1).

Figure 1: Trends in nights spent in EU-28 tourist accommodation establishments, EU-28, 2005-2017 (index_2005=100)
Source: Eurostat (tour_occ_ninat)

More than two out of three of these nights were spent in five Member States: Spain (15 %) , France (14 %), United Kingdom (14 %), Italy (13 %) and Germany (13 %) (see Table 1).

Table 1: Nights spent in tourist accommodation establishments, 2017
Source: Eurostat (tour_occ_ninat)

Looking at the distribution by type of accommodation, hotels and similar accommodation were clearly the most popular (63 %), followed by holiday and other short-stay accommodation such as rented apartments (24 %) and camping grounds, recreational vehicle parks and trailer parks (13 %). However, there were significant regional differences: in Cyprus, Malta and Bulgaria, hotels covered more than 90 % of the entire market for rented accommodation; nearly half of the tourism nights in Croatia were spent in holiday and other short-stay accommodation, while in Denmark, Luxembourg, France and Sweden the market share of campsites was more than double the average for the whole of the EU.

All three types of tourist accommodation showed increases for 2017. The number of nights spent in hotels increased by 4.5 %. Nights spent in holiday and other short-stay accommodation and nights spent at campsites increased by 6.8 % and 5.7 % respectively (see Table 2).

Table 2 : Percentage change in nights spent in tourist accommodation establishments, 2017 compared with 2016 (%)
Source: Eurostat (tour_occ_ninat)

The increase at EU level reflected national developments. Luxembourg was the only Member State reporting a decrease (-2.2 %) in 2017. Slovenia, Latvia and Croatia recorded growth of over 10.0 % (see Figure 2 and Table 2).

Figure 2: Percentage change in number of nights spent in tourist accommodation establishments , 2017 compared with 2016 (%)
Source: Eurostat (tour_occ_ninat)

Increase in nights spent due to residents and non-residents

The overall increase of 5.2 % for nights spent in 2017 was mainly due to the increase of nights spent by foreign visitors (+6.6 %) but also of nights spent by residents (+3.9 %) (see Table 2 and Figure 3).

Figure 3: Percentage change in number of nights spent by residents and non-residents in tourist accommodation establishments, 2017 compared with 2016 (%)
Source: Eurostat (tour_occ_ninat)

The nights spent by non-residents grew by +5.1 % in 2016 and increased further by +6.6 % in 2017. Slovenia and Finland recorded growths of more than 15 % in 2017 compared with 2016, while a decrease was observed in Luxembourg (-2.4 %) (see Figure 3).

Following an increase of 3.1 % in 2016, the number of nights spent by domestic tourists in the EU increased further in 2017 (+3.9 %). The biggest increase was recorded in Malta (+13.6 %) followed by Latvia (+12.6 %), while a drop was recorded in three Member States: Cyprus (-1.2 %), Bulgaria (-1.0 %) and Denmark (-0.1 %) (see Figure 3).

Taking into account the population of the country (tourism intensity), Malta, Croatia, Cyprus and Austria recorded the highest number of nights spent per inhabitant over the year 2017 (20.8, 20.7, 19.6 and 13.8 nights respectively). In the EU, an average of 6.1 guest nights was recorded in relation to the overall population of 511.5 million in 2017 (see Figure 4).

Figure 4: Tourism intensity, guest nights spent in tourist accommodation establishments per inhabitant, 2017
Source: Eurostat (tour_occ_ninat)

The top 20 regions represented 34.5 % of all nights spent

The top destination country (Spain) accounted for 15 % of all guest nights in rented accommodation in the year 2017. Looking at regional[1] data, the top two regions at NUTS 2 level attracted 6 % of all guest nights in the EU during 2017. These regions were the Canary Islands and Catalonia (see Table 3).

Table 3: Top 20 tourism destinations (NUTS 2 regions) in terms of nights spent in tourist accommodation establishments, 2017
Source: Eurostat (tour_occ_nin2)

In 2017, the top 20 regions represented 34.5 % of all nights spent in the 281 regions of the EU (see Table 3). Following the two above mentioned Spanish regions, the third and fourth most popular destinations in the EU were the Adriatic coastal region of Jadranska Hrvatska in Croatia and the French capital city region of Île de France.

Germans spent 19 % of non-resident nights in EU tourist accommodation

In 2017, more than half (52 %) of nights in tourist accommodation were spent by residents, travelling inside their own country (see Figure 5).

Figure 5: Nights spent in tourist accommodation establishments by origine of the guest, EU-28, 2017 (%)
Source: Eurostat (tour_occ_ninraw)

The majority of the 48 % of nights spent by non-residents were by tourists coming from other EU Member States (72 %), while 10 % were spent by tourists coming from other European countries. Only 18 % of non-resident nights were spent by tourists from other continents (See Figure 6).

Figure 6: Nights spent by non-residents in tourist accommodation establishments by world region of residence of the guest, EU-28, 2017 (%)
Source: Eurostat (tour_occ_ninraw)

German residents accounted for 19.4 % of the total non-resident nights in EU tourist accommodation, followed by British (12.0 %) and Dutch (6.4 %) tourists (see Table 4). For 10 out of the 27 Member States - excluding the German domestic market - the greatest number of tourists came from Germany. For 16 out of the 17 remaining Member States, nights spent by German tourists were their second or third market, while they were the fourth market for the United Kingdom.

Table 4: Nights spent in tourist accommodation establishments by origin of the guest, 2017 (%)
Source: Eurostat (tour_occ_ninraw)

Figure 7 looks at the development of nights spent by non-residents in EU-28 tourist accommodation over the period 2005-2017 for five individual non-EU countries. Among these countries, Russia, Brazil and China are generally considered emerging markets with the potential to increase European tourism in the years and decades to come. Total non-resident nights (regardless of the country of origin of the guest) increased by 49 % during this period. Nights spent by residents of Russia, Brazil and China showed significantly higher growth rates – in particular since 2009 - respectively doubling, tripling or quadrupling their market share over the period 2005-2017. In 2017 these three countries generated 5.2 % of all nights spent by non-residents in the EU accommodation sector or 18.8 % of the nights spent by guests from outside the EU. The other two countries – the United States and Japan – appear to be more saturated generating markets, with a relatively stable number of tourists over the past decade.

Figure 7: Nights spent by non-residents in EU-28 tourist accommodation establishments, 2005-2017 (index _2005=100)
Source: Eurostat (tour_occ_ninraw)

Coastal areas accounted for nearly half of all nights spent

Data for the accommodation sector is available by type of locality, i.e. the coastal nature or the degree of urbanisation of the location.

In 2017, nearly half of the nights spent in EU tourist accommodation (46 %) were spent in coastal areas (see Table 5). Besides Malta which is 100 % coastal country, this ratio exceeded 90 % in Cyprus, Greece, Croatia and Denmark. Leaving aside the five landlocked countries (Czechia, Luxembourg, Hungary, Austria and Slovakia), the proportion of coastal areas in total nights spent was below 20 % only in Germany, Romania and Slovenia. When distinguishing by type of accommodation, coastal tourism was particularly important for campsites, with 60 % of total nights spent (see Figure 8).

Table 5: Share of nights spent in tourist accommodation establishments by type of locality, 2017 (%)
Source: Eurostat (tour_occ_ninatc) (tour_occ_ninatd)


Figure 8: Share of nights spent by type of location of the accommodation establishment, EU-28, 2017 (%)
Source: Eurostat (tour_occ_ninatc) (tour_occ_ninatd)

In terms of degree of urbanisation, there was a good balance between nights spent in cities, towns and rural areas, each accounting for roughly one third of the nights spent (see Table 5). National data shows a mix of city tourism and countryside or non-urban coastal tourism. In Latvia, the United Kingdom and Estonia nights spent in cities accounted for more than 50% of the total number of nights spent in the country. This is very likely due to the relative attractiveness or popularity of the capital regions. In Croatia, Greece, Austria and Denmark the thinly populated municipalities were far more popular – very likely because of the importance of the seaside or the mountains for the tourism sector in these countries.

Nearly 32 million bed places in EU tourist accommodation

In 2017, the EU could offer nearly 32 million bed places to accommodate tourists, spread over more than 656 000 establishments. In terms of bed places, France (5.1 million) and Italy (5.0 million) accounted for nearly one third of total available capacity (see Table 6).

Table 6: Capacity of tourist accommodation establishments by NACE group, 2017
Source: Eurostat (tour_cap_nat)

The comparability of this data is affected by the fact that countries apply data collection thresholds. In many countries, establishments having fewer than ten bed places are not covered by these statistics, but the threshold applied is not identical across the European Union.

For countries where a breakdown by size class is available, 65 % of hotels and similar accommodation establishments had 25 bedrooms or fewer, 28 % had between 25 and 99 and 7 % were large establishments with a capacity of 100 or more bedrooms (see Table 7).

Table 7: Hotels and similar accommodation establishments by size class, 2017 (%)
Source: Eurostat (tour_cap_nats)

Average occupancy rate of bed places in hotels was 46 %

Comparing the capacity data in terms of available beds or rooms with the occupancy data in terms of nights spent gives an indicator of the occupancy rates. At EU level, the net occupancy rate of bed places in hotels was 46.2 % in 2017. The highest occupancy rates were recorded in Cyprus (76.4 %), Malta (66.4 %) and Spain (62.6 %) (see Table 8, Figure 9).

Table 8: Net occupancy rates of bed places and bedrooms in hotels and similar accommodation establishments by size class, 2017 (%)
Source: Eurostat (tour_occ_anor)


Figure 9: Net occupancy rates of bedrooms and bed places in hotels and similar accommodation establishments, 2017 (%)
Source: Eurostat (tour_cap_nat)

In terms of bedroom occupancy (regardless of how many guests stayed in the room), hotels in Malta recorded an occupancy rate of 76.7 %, followed by Cyprus (74.6 %).

For most of the countries for which a breakdown by size class is available, occupancy rates increase with the size of the establishments.

Source data for tables and graphs

Data sources

For the short-term trends in the nights spent at tourist accommodation establishments in the European Union (EU), see Tourism statistics - nights spent at tourist accommodation establishments.

Context

The EU is a major tourist destination, with five Member States among the world’s top ten destinations for holidaymakers, according to UNWTO[2] data. Tourism is an important activity in the EU which contributes to employment and economic growth, as well as to the development of rural, peripheral or less-developed areas. These characteristics drive the demand for reliable and harmonised statistics on this activity, as well as within the wider context of regional policy and sustainable development policy areas.

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