Mental health and related issues statistics


Data extracted in July 2018.
Planned article update: August 2019.

Highlights
4 % of all deaths in the EU in 2015 resulted from mental and behavioural disorders.
7 % of the EU population in 2014 reported having chronic depression.

In 2015, 14 % of all hospital beds in the EU were psychiatric care beds.

Number of psychiatrists, 2016

This article presents an overview of European Union (EU) statistics related to mental and behavioural disorders, Alzheimer’s disease (which is a disease of the nervous system) and intentional self-harm (which is an external cause of morbidity and mortality). It focuses on four aspects:

  • deaths from mental and behavioural disorders, Alzheimer’s disease and intentional self-harm;
  • the extent of depressive disorders;
  • healthcare for mental and behavioural disorders and Alzheimer’s disease; and
  • the availability of specialist healthcare resources (beds and personnel).

Mental and behavioural disorders include, for example, dementias (chronic or persistent mental disorders characterised by memory disorder, personality change and impaired reasoning), schizophrenia, and lifestyle influenced disorders (such as alcohol use or drug dependence).

Note that this article generally does not cover diseases of the nervous system, but because Alzheimer’s disease may be linked to mental disorders, that particular disease is combined with the data for dementia in Tables 2 and 5 concerning causes of death and the average length of in-patients stays in hospital. Like dementia, Alzheimer’s disease is a brain disorder; it can be difficult to distinguish these two disorders as their symptoms are often quite similar. The aetio-pathological difference between vascular dementia (when dementia symptoms occur because of problems with the brain’s blood supply, for example through a stroke) and brain disorders caused by Alzheimer’s disease can be made post-mortem, through an autopsy.

This article is one of a set of statistical articles concerning health status in the EU which forms part of an online publication on health statistics.

Full article

Deaths from mental and behavioural disorders, Alzheimer’s disease and intentional self-harm

In 2015, there were 214 000 deaths in the EU-28 resulting from mental and behavioural disorders, equivalent to 4.1 % of all deaths. Table 1 shows that the proportion of deaths in the United Kingdom (9.0 %) from mental and behavioural disorders was at least twice as high as the EU-28 average, while mental and behavioural disorders also accounted for at least 1 in 20 deaths in the Netherlands, Sweden, Denmark, Luxembourg, Ireland and Spain; some 8.1 % of all deaths in Switzerland were also attributed to mental and behavioural disorders as were 6.6 % in Norway. By contrast, less than 1.0 % of all deaths were from mental and behavioural disorders in five of the EU Member States, with this share as low as 0.1 % in Romania and Bulgaria.

Table 1: Causes of death — mental and behavioural disorders, residents, 2015
Source: Eurostat (hlth_cd_aro) and (hlth_cd_asdr2)

A higher share of women (than men) in the EU-28 died from mental and behavioural disorders (5.1 % of deaths among women compared with 3.1 % among men). This pattern was repeated across most of the EU Member States and was most pronounced in the Netherlands and the United Kingdom where the differences between the sexes were 4.5 and 5.2 percentage points respectively. By contrast, a higher share of the total number of deaths among men (rather than women) was attributed to mental and behavioural disorders in Slovenia, Poland, Estonia, Romania and Latvia.

The EU-28’s standardised death rate for mental and behavioural disorders was 43.4 deaths per 100 000 inhabitants in 2015; the death rate for men was only slightly higher than that for women — see Table 1. This pattern was repeated in most EU Member States, with the largest differences in Slovenia, Luxembourg and Denmark, where the gender gap ranged from 13.3 to 18.7 more deaths per 100 000 inhabitants for men than for women. Standardised death rates for mental and behavioural disorders were higher for women (than men) in Greece, Spain, Italy, Sweden, Ireland, the Netherlands, the United Kingdom, Cyprus and Malta: the difference in the rates was 12.0 more deaths per 100 000 inhabitants for women than for men in Cyprus and 14.2 more in Malta.

Deaths in younger ages can be considered as premature. Indeed Table 1 also shows clearly that mental and behavioural disorders were a particularly common cause of death at advanced ages. The EU-28’s standardised death rate from mental and behavioural disorders for those aged 65 and over was 57 times as high as the standardised death rate for persons aged less than 65 in 2015; this can be compared with the same ratio for all causes of death, where the death rate for those aged 65 and over was 21 times as high.

Among the mental and behavioural disorders, dementia (including data for Alzheimer's disease) was the most common cause of death in the EU-28, although among men in Slovenia, Latvia, Poland and Estonia deaths due to the use of alcohol were more common

A more detailed analysis of causes of death is presented in Table 2 for a selection of mental and behavioural disorders, including data for Alzheimer’s disease in the data for dementia. As can be seen, the leading causes of death from mental and behavioural disorders among both men and women were dementia and Alzheimer’s disease (International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (ICD) codes F00-03 and G30). Nevertheless, the standardised death rate for mental and behavioural disorders due to the use of alcohol (code F10) was also relatively high in 2015 in some EU Member States, notably among men in Slovenia, Denmark, Latvia, Austria, Germany, Croatia, Estonia and Poland. In fact, among men, the standardised death rate for mental and behavioural disorders due to the use of alcohol was higher than for dementia and Alzheimer’s disease in Slovenia (values only include Alzheimer's disease), Latvia, Poland and Estonia.

Table 2: Standardised death rates — selected mental and behavioural disorders and Alzheimer's disease, residents, 2015
(per 100 000 male / female inhabitants)
Source: Eurostat (hlth_cd_asdr2)

Standardised death rates for other mental and behavioural disorders (codes F04-09, F17 and F20-99) were relatively low for men and women, with rates below 6.0 per 100 000 inhabitants for men and 5.0 per 100 000 inhabitants for women in 2015 in all but one of the EU Member States. The exception to this pattern was Croatia, where the rate for men stood at 15.1 per 100 000 inhabitants and that for women at 14.1 per 100 000 inhabitants.

Standardised death rates for drug dependence and toxicomania were even lower, with rates in most EU Member States below 1.0 per 100 000 inhabitants in 2015. The only exceptions to this pattern were recorded in Austria and Germany for men and Austria for women.

Men 3.7 times as likely as women to die from intentional self-harm

In 2015, the standardised death rate for intentional self-harm (codes X60-84 and Y87.0) was 10.9 per 100 000 inhabitants for the EU-28, with the rate for men 3.7 times as high as that for women (see Table 3). It should be noted that the comparability of data on intentional self-harm is thought to be limited due to an under reporting of suicides in some EU Member States (possibly due to cultural stigma and other reasons).

Table 3: Standardised death rates — intentional self-harm, residents, 2015
(per 100 000 inhabitants)
Source: Eurostat (hlth_cd_asdr2)

The highest standardised death rate for intentional self-harm in 2015 among the EU Member States was recorded for Lithuania (30.3 per 100 000 inhabitants), followed at some distance by Slovenia, Latvia and Hungary, each with rates within the range of 19.0-20.7 per 100 000 inhabitants. Rates between 7.4 and 17.3 per 100 000 inhabitants were recorded for most of the other EU Member States, with Italy (6.1 per 100 000 inhabitants), Greece (4.7 per 100 000 inhabitants) and Cyprus (4.5 per 100 000 inhabitants) below this range.

In all EU Member States, standardised death rates for intentional self-harm for men were higher than those for women in 2015, ranging from 2.3 times as high in the Netherlands to 7.1 times as high in Poland, with the largest absolute difference in Lithuania where the rate for women was 10.1 per 100 000 inhabitants and the rate for men was 56.3 per 100 000 inhabitants.

The standardised death rate for intentional self-harm in the EU-28 was higher for persons aged 65 and over (16.6 per 100 000 inhabitants) than for younger people (9.5 per 100 000 inhabitants). This situation, a higher standardised death rate for older people, was observed in 2015 for all EU Member States except for the United Kingdom, Cyprus, Ireland and Malta where the rates for younger people were higher than those for older people. For both of the age groups shown in Table 3, all of the Member States reported higher standardised death rates for intentional self-harm for men (compared with women).

Extent of depressive disorders

Women reported depressive disorders more often than men

Depressive disorders cover single depressive episodes and recurrent depressive disorders (codes F32-33). In typical depressive episodes: the patient suffers from lowering of mood, reduction of energy, and decrease in activity; the patient’s capacity for enjoyment, interest, and concentration is reduced, and marked tiredness after even minimum effort is common; sleep is usually disturbed and appetite diminished; self-esteem and self-confidence are almost always reduced and, even in a mild form, some ideas of guilt or worthlessness are often present.

The second wave of the European health interview survey (EHIS) was conducted between 2013 and 2015 and covers persons aged 15 and over. The survey included questions on self-assessment of an individual’s health and data on chronic diseases diagnosed by a medical doctor and which occurred during the previous 12 months. These data are available for all EU Member States, Iceland, Norway and Turkey. The next wave of the survey will be conducted in 2019 and it will be run at regular five-year intervals afterwards.

In 2014, 7.1 % of the EU-28 population reported having chronic depression. With 12.1 %, Ireland topped the ranking for the share of its population reporting chronic depression, while double-digit shares were also recorded in Portugal, Germany and Finland. The proportion of people reporting depression was less than 4.0 % in Czechia, Cyprus, Bulgaria and Romania.

Figure 1: Share of the population reporting that they had chronic depression, 2014
(%)
Source: Eurostat (hlth_ehis_cd1e)

The proportion of people who had depressive disorders was higher for women than for men in each of the EU Member States; this pattern was also repeated in Iceland, Norway and Turkey. The share of women reporting chronic depression peaked in Portugal at 17.2 %, which contributed towards Portugal recording the largest gender gap: the share of Portuguese women reporting chronic depression was 11.3 percentage points higher than the corresponding share for Portuguese men. Gaps of at least 5.0 percentage points were also recorded in Spain, Latvia and Sweden; this was also the case in Turkey.

1 in 10 Europeans aged 75 and over reported chronic depression

Looking across the age groups from youngest to oldest in Table 4, the share of people reporting depression generally increased with age; that said, there was a relatively low prevalence of chronic depression among the young (compared with most other diseases). The only exception to the pattern of increasing prevalence with age was for the class covering those aged 65-74 years, where the prevalence of depression was lower than for people aged 45-54 and 55-64 years.

Table 4: Share of the population reporting that they had chronic depression, 2015
(%)
Source: Eurostat (hlth_ehis_cd1e)

In 15 of the EU Member States self-perceived chronic depression peaked within the age group covering those aged 75 years or over and in another seven of the Member States it was highest among people aged 55-64 years. In Portugal, more than one in every five people between the ages of 65 and 74 years reported having chronic depression. By contrast, the highest share of people reporting chronic depression in Sweden was among those aged 25-34 years (13.1 %), while in Denmark it was among those aged 35-44 years (9.8 %). The pattern in Iceland was almost the reverse of the general developments witnessed for the whole of the EU-28 insofar as the highest proportion of the population reporting chronic depression was recorded among those aged 15-24 years (21.7 %), a share that fell with age to 7.9 % among those aged 65-74 years, before climbing to 10.0 % for those aged 75 years or over.

People living in EU cities were most likely to report chronic depression disorders

Except for the demographic factors analysed so far, the prevalence of chronic depression is also affected by the degree of urbanisation. Figure 2 reveals that people living in cities were more likely to suffer from chronic depression. In 2014, 7.8 % of the persons living in cities in the EU-28 reported depression. This share was higher than the shares for people living in towns and suburbs (7.1 %) or in rural areas (6.2 %).

Figure 2: Share of the population reporting that they had chronic depression, by degree of urbanisation, 2014
(%)
Source: Eurostat (hlth_ehis_cd1u)

Concerning the effects of urbanisation, the majority of EU Member States can be classified into two distinct groups following opposite patterns: those in which the chronic depression rate was higher among those living in cities and those in which rural areas accounted for the highest rates of chronic depression. In the first group, the highest proportions were recorded in Ireland (13.2 %), Portugal (13.0 %), Germany (11.7 %) and Finland (11.3 %). Among the eight Member States composing the second group, Sweden (10.2 %) and Spain (8.6 %) recorded the highest rates. Only in Luxembourg, Latvia and Lithuania (as well as Iceland among non-member countries), were the rates for chronic depression higher for people living in towns and suburbs; they ranged from 5.5 % in Lithuania to 10.6 % in Luxembourg, with the rate in Iceland even higher (17.4 %).

Mental healthcare

In 2016, there were 4.0 million in-patients with mental and behavioural disorders who were discharged from hospitals in the EU (2015 data for Hungary, Poland and Portugal; no recent data for Greece). In-patient discharges of those treated for mental and behavioural disorders accounted for 8.2 % of the total number of in-patient hospital discharges in Latvia, 7.7 % in Luxembourg and 7.1 % in Finland, while these diseases accounted for less than 1.0 % of all in-patient discharges in the Netherlands.

Relative to population size, Germany, Latvia, Austria, Romania, Lithuania, Finland and France recorded the highest number of in-patient discharges for those treated for mental and behavioural disorders in 2016, some 1 200 to 1 700 per 100 000 inhabitants, more than 10 times as high as the equivalent ratios for Cyprus and the Netherlands, where the lowest ratios were recorded.

Figure 3: Hospital discharge rates for in-patients with mental and behavioural disorders, 2016
(per 100 000 inhabitants)
Source: Eurostat (hlth_co_disch2)

Particularly long average length of stay for in-patients with mental and behavioural disorders

Across the EU-28 (2016 data except: 2015 data for Poland and Portugal; 2014 data for Hungary; no recent data for Greece), in-patients with mental and behavioural disorders (ICD codes F00-F99) spent a total of 98.6 million days in hospital.

Table 5 presents an analysis of the average length of hospital stays for in-patients treated for mental and behavioural disorders in 2011 and 2016. In 2016, this ranged from 9.4 days in Belgium up to more than 40.0 days in Malta and Czechia. For the vast majority of EU Member States these were the longest average lengths of stay of all the categories in the International Shortlist for Hospital Morbidity Tabulation, the only exception being Belgium.

Table 5: In-patient average length of stay for mental and behavioural disorders and Alzheimer's disease, 2011 and 2016
(days)
Source: Eurostat (hlth_co_inpst), (hlth_co_disch1) and (hlth_co_hosday)

Among 11 of the 27 EU Member States for which data are available (no comparison available for Greece), the average length of a hospital stay for people treated for mental and behavioural disorders fell between 2011 and 2016; the largest reductions were recorded in Finland and Malta, down 11.4 and 11.7 days respectively. In Italy and Romania the average length of stay was the same in 2016 as it had been in 2011. Of the 14 Member States that recorded an increase in the average time spent in hospital for these diseases, increases were generally at most 2.0 days, although much larger increases were observed in Cyprus and France.

The remainder of Table 5 provides a more detailed analysis of the average length of hospital stays for in-patients diagnosed with six different types of mental and behavioural disorders; data for in-patients treated for Alzheimer’s disease are again included in the data for dementia. Generally, in-patients with schizophrenia, schizotypal and delusional disorders (codes F20-29) and with dementia and Alzheimer’s disease (codes F00-03 and G30) spent the highest average number of days in hospital, whereas those with disorders related to the use of alcohol (code F10) or psychoactive substances (codes F11-19) generally spent less time in hospital.

Healthcare beds and personnel

Falling numbers of psychiatric beds in hospitals but increasing numbers of psychiatrists

In 2015, there were 363 thousand psychiatric care beds in hospitals in the EU-28, equivalent to 13.9 % of all hospital beds. In 2016, this share exceeded one quarter in Malta (26.8 %) and the Netherlands (26.7 %), and exceeded one fifth in Belgium (24.1 %) and Latvia (22.3 %). By contrast, it was below one tenth in Poland (9.9 %), Austria (8.2 %), Bulgaria (7.7 %), Cyprus (6.4 %) and Italy (2.9 %; 2015 data).

Figure 4 shows the number of psychiatric care beds in hospitals relative to the size of population and this shows a similar list of EU Member States with particularly high or low values, ranging from 9.3 per 100 000 inhabitants in Italy (2015 data) to 137.3 per 100 000 inhabitants in Belgium. Between 2011 and 2016 the number of psychiatric care beds in hospitals relative to the size of population fell in most EU Member States with the notable exceptions of Romania, Germany, Slovakia and Poland where there was relatively fast growth (note that there is a break in series for Poland), as well as Slovenia, Cyprus, Estonia and Portugal where the rate of change was more subdued.

Figure 4: Hospital beds — psychiatric care beds, 2011 and 2016
(per 100 000 inhabitants)
Source: Eurostat (hlth_rs_bds)

Psychiatrists are medical doctors who specialise in the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of mental illness. They have post-graduate training in psychiatry and may also have additional training in a psychiatric speciality, such as neuropsychiatry or child psychiatry. In 2016, there were around 92 thousand psychiatrists in the 26 EU Member States for which data are available (2015 data for Denmark, Poland, Finland and Sweden; 2013 data for Czechia ; no recent data for Hungary or Slovakia). There were between 7.6 and 27.3 psychiatrists per 100 000 inhabitants across those EU Member States for which data are available (see Figure 5), with the highest number of psychiatrists relative to the size of population in Germany and the lowest in Bulgaria.

Figure 5: Number of psychiatrists, 2011 and 2016
(per 100 000 inhabitants)
Source: Eurostat (hlth_rs_spec)

Psychologists study the mind and its functions, in particular in relation to individual and social behaviour. The second wave of the EHIS included questions asking respondents about their medical consultations with various specialists, including psychologists, psychotherapists or psychiatrists; the survey’s coverage was persons aged 15 and over.

On average, the percentage of persons who reported having consulted a psychologist, psychotherapist, or psychiatrist in the 12 months prior to the EHIS survey was higher among women (6.3 %) than men (4.2 %). This pattern was apparent across almost all EU Member States (see Figure 6), the exceptions being Croatia and Malta where the respective proportion was higher for men than for women. In Romania, the proportions for the two sexes were about the same. The largest gender differences were in Sweden and Denmark (differences of 6.7 and 6.6 percentage points), where the share of women having consulted a psychologist or psychiatrist was about twice as high as the share for men; a similar situation was observed in Iceland

Figure 6: Share of the population aged 15 or over reporting that they had consulted a psychologist, psychotherapist or psychiatrist, 2014
(%)
Source: Eurostat (hlth_ehis_am6e)

Overall (men and women combined), the proportion of the population aged 15 or over that consulted a psychologist or psychiatrist in the 12 months prior to the survey was between 2.1 % and 8.1 % in most EU Member States: the shares in Sweden (8.6 %), the Netherlands (8.7 %), Germany (9.4 %) and Denmark (10.4 %) were above this range; the shares in Bulgaria (1.6 %), Cyprus (1.1 %) and Romania (0.3 %) were below it. Iceland also recorded a high share (11.0 %).

Source data for tables and graphs

Data sources

Key concepts

An in-patient is a patient who is formally admitted (or ‘hospitalised’) to an institution for treatment and/or care and stays for a minimum of one night or more than 24 hours in the hospital or other institution providing in-patient care. An in-patient or day care patient is discharged from hospital when formally released after a procedure or course of treatment (episode of care). A discharge may occur because of the finalisation of treatment, signing out against medical advice, transfer to another healthcare institution, or because of death.

The number of deaths from a particular cause of death can be expressed relative to the size of the population. A standardised (rather than crude) death rate can be compiled which is independent of the age and sex structure of a population: this is done as most causes of death vary significantly by age and according to sex and the standardisation facilitates comparisons of rates over time and between countries.

Healthcare resources and activities

Statistics on healthcare resources (such as beds and personnel) and healthcare activities (such as information on hospital discharges) are documented in this background article which provides information on the scope of the data, its legal basis, the methodology employed, as well as related concepts and definitions.

For hospital discharges and the length of stay in hospitals, the International Shortlist for Hospital Morbidity Tabulation (ISHMT) is used to classify data from 2000 onwards; Chapter V covers mental and behavioural disorders and Chapter VI covers diseases of the nervous system (which includes Alzheimer’s disease):

  • Dementia (0501);
  • Mental and behavioural disorders due to alcohol (0502);
  • Mental and behavioural disorders due to use of other psychoactive substances (0503);
  • Mood [affective] disorders (0504);
  • Schizophrenia, schizotypal and delusional disorders (0505);
  • Other mental and behavioural disorders (0506);
  • Alzheimer's disease (0601).

For country specific notes on this data collection, please refer to this background information document.

Health status

Self-reported statistics covering the health status of the population for a range of chronic diseases is provided by the European health interview survey (EHIS). This source is documented in more detail in this background article which provides information on the scope of the data, its legal basis, the methodology employed, as well as related concepts and definitions. The data presented in this article refer to the share of the population aged 15 and over reporting to have been diagnosed by a medical doctor with depression which occurred during the 12 months prior to the survey.

Causes of death

Statistics on causes of death provide information on mortality patterns, supplying information on developments over time in the underlying causes of death. This source is documented in more detail in this background article which provides information on the scope of the data, its legal basis, the methodology employed, as well as related concepts and definitions.

Causes of death are classified according to the European shortlist (86 causes), which is based on the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (ICD). Chapter V of the ICD covers mental and behavioural disorders, Chapter VI covers diseases of the nervous system (including Alzheimer's disease) and Chapter XX covers external causes of mortality (including intentional self-harm):

  • F00-F09 Organic, including symptomatic, mental disorders;
  • F10-F19 Mental and behavioural disorders due to psychoactive substance use;
  • F20-F29 Schizophrenia, schizotypal and delusional disorders;
  • F30-F39 Mood [affective] disorders;
  • F40-F48 Neurotic, stress-related and somatoform disorders;
  • F50-F59 Behavioural syndromes associated with physiological disturbances and physical factors;
  • F60-F69 Disorders of adult personality and behaviour;
  • F70-F79 Mental retardation;
  • F80-F89 Disorders of psychological development;
  • F90-F98 Behavioural and emotional disorders with onset usually occurring in childhood and adolescence;
  • F99 Unspecified mental disorder;
  • G30 Alzheimer's disease;
  • X60-X84 and Y87.0 Intentional self-harm.

For country specific notes on this data collection, please refer to this background information document.

Note on tables: the symbol ‘:’ is used to show where data are not available.

Context

Mental and behavioural disorders make up one of the largest categories of diseases in the EU. The number of in-patient bed days for mental and behavioural disorders in the EU was more than 83 million in 2015 (2014 data for Belgium, Ireland and Hungary; no recent data for Greece or the Netherlands), which was second only to diseases of the circulatory system; an additional 1.9 million in-patient bed days were recorded for EU patients diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease (2014 data for Belgium and Hungary; no recent data for Estonia, Greece or the Netherlands). Nevertheless, it is believed that many mild to moderate mental disorders are under-diagnosed and consequently untreated and not reported within these official statistics.

As well as being important for individuals, good mental health is important for society. It impacts on economic performance through productivity losses and increased work-disability costs and may also create a burden for educational and justice systems.

In November 2005, the European Commission published a Green paper Improving the mental health of the population — towards a strategy on mental health for the European Union. Subsequently, the European pact for mental health and well-being was launched, identifying five priority areas:

  • prevention of depression and suicide;
  • mental health in youth and education;
  • mental health in workplace settings;
  • mental health of older people;
  • combating stigma and social exclusion.

Between 2009 and 2011 the pact was implemented by way of five conferences, one for each priority; two further conferences were held on ‘Mental health: challenges and possibilities’ (October 2013) and ‘Youth mental health’ (December 2014).

In 2013, a joint action on mental health and wellbeing was launched. This action built on previous work developed under the European pact and was carried out until January 2016. Its objective was to contribute to the promotion of mental health and well-being, the prevention of mental disorders, and the improvement of care and social inclusion of people with mental disorders in Europe. The joint action addressed issues related to five areas:

  • promotion of mental health in the workplace;
  • promotion of mental health in schools;
  • promoting action against depression and suicide and implementation of e-health approaches;
  • developing community-based and socially inclusive mental health care for people with severe mental disorders; and
  • promoting the integration of mental health in all policies.
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Self-reported chronic morbidity (hlth_srcm)
People reporting a chronic disease, by disease (hlth_ehis_cd1)
Health care resources (hlth_res)
Health care staff (hlth_staff)
Health care facilities (hlth_facil)
Health care activities (hlth_act)
Hospital discharges and length of stay for inpatient and curative care (hlth_co_dischls)
Hospital discharges - national data (hlth_hosd)
Length of stay in hospital (hlth_hostay)
Consultations (hlth_consult)
Self-reported consultation of mental healthcare or rehabilitative care professionals (hlth_ehis_am6)
General mortality (hlth_cd_gmor)
Causes of death - deaths by country of residence and occurrence (hlth_cd_aro)
Causes of death - standardised death rate by residence (hlth_cd_asdr2)