Maritime transport statistics - short sea shipping of goods


Data from January 2021.

Planned update of the article: February 2022.

Highlights

The total gross weight of goods transported as part of EU short sea shipping was estimated at almost 1.8 billion tonnes in 2019.

Italy was the major short sea shipping country in the EU in 2019, with a share of almost 15 % of the total EU short sea shipping tonnage.


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Short sea shipping of freight, 2009, 2018 and 2019

This article presents recent short sea shipping (SSS) statistics of the European Union (EU), covering the transport of goods between main ports in the EU-27 Member States and ports situated in geographical Europe or in non-European countries on the Mediterranean and the Black Sea. In addition to the EU Member States, short sea shipping statistics are also available for main ports in the EFTA country Norway, the United Kingdom and the candidate countries Montenegro and Turkey. The results are broken down by country, sea region, type of cargo and top ports.

Full article


EU short sea shipping peaked at 1.8 billion tonnes in 2019

The total gross weight of goods transported as part of EU short sea shipping is estimated at almost 1.8 billion tonnes in 2019, an increase of 1.5 % from the previous year. The overall increase in short sea shipping recorded by the main EU ports consolidated the gradual recovery seen in EU short sea shipping following the economic downturn in Europe in 2009 and reached a new high in 2019 (Figure 1).

Figure 1: Gross weight of seaborne freight transported to/from main ports by type of shipping, EU-27, 2005-2019
(million tonnes)
Source: Eurostat (mar_sg_am_cw)

Short sea shipping made up 60 % of the total sea transport of goods to and from the main EU ports in 2019, one percentage point more as compared to 2018. When looking at the reporting countries, the share of short sea shipping in total sea transport varies considerably. The predominance of short sea shipping of goods over deep sea shipping was particularly pronounced in Cyprus, Finland, Sweden, Denmark, Ireland, Bulgaria, Malta, Estonia, Latvia, Italy, Poland, Greece, Lithuania, Romania, as well as in the EFTA country Norway, in the United Kingdom and in the candidate countries Montenegro and Turkey, all with short sea shipping shares of 70 % or more in their main ports (Figure 2).

Figure 2: Short sea shipping of freight in total sea transport, 2019
(% share in tonnes)
Source: Eurostat (mar_sg_am_cw)

Geographical considerations, such as long coast lines or a large number of inhabited islands, will play a part in explaining the high share of short sea shipping in most of these countries. A large volume of feeder services to or from hub ports will also explain the high degree of short sea shipping transport in countries which function as regional trans-shipment points. In contrast, the share of short sea shipping is lower in countries with major ports focused on intercontinental trade. In 2019, it is lower than 52 % in Belgium, Spain, the Netherlands and Slovenia.

Italy and the Netherlands accounted for almost 30% of EU short sea shipping in 2019

Italy was the major short sea shipping country in the EU in 2019, with 311 million tonnes, representing a share of almost 15 % of the total tonnages of EU short sea shipping in 2019. The Netherlands followed with 300 million tonnes and then Spain with 236 million tonnes of short shipped goods recorded in their main ports (Figure 3).

Figure 3: Short sea shipping of freight, 2009, 2018 and 2019
(million tonnes)
Source: Eurostat (mar_sg_am_cw)

Bulgaria recorded the largest relative increase in short sea shipping between 2018 and 2019 (+13.4 % ), followed by Spain (+11.9 % ) [1], Cyprus (+9.3 %), Romania (+7.6 % ), Belgium (+5.2 % ) and Estonia (+5.1 % ). By contrast, Latvia recorded the largest relative fall in short sea shipping of goods (-7.1 % ), followed by Croatia (-7.0 % ).

Inward movements accounted for almost 60 % of the total tonnes of goods handled in the EU ports that were involved in short sea shipping transport (Figure 4). More seaborne goods were unloaded from than loaded onto vessels in the majority of EU countries. Malta and Cyprus had the highest shares of unloaded goods in 2019, with respective shares of 86 % and 75 % of the total tonnes of short sea shipped goods recorded as inward movements to their ports. In contrast, the three Baltic countries, Bulgaria, Finland and the EEA country Norway had more outward movements of short sea shipped goods than inwards movements.

Figure 4: Short sea shipping of freight by direction, 2019
(million tonnes)
Source: Eurostat (mar_sg_am_cwd)

The short sea shipping of goods between main EU ports and ports located in the Mediterranean Sea came to almost 629 million tonnes in 2019. This amounted to 32 % of the total EU short sea shipping tonnages for all sea regions in 2019. The Mediterranean Sea was followed by the North Sea and the Baltic Sea, with shares of 23 % and 21 % of the total EU short shipping tonnages, respectively (Figure 5).

Figure 5: Short sea shipping of freight by sea region of partner ports, 2019
(% share based on tonnes)
Source: Eurostat (mar_sg_am_cws)

For most countries, the highest share of their short sea shipping of goods was with partner ports located in the same sea region or sea regions. There are some exceptions, like Latvia on the Baltic, where 40 % of the short sea shipping of goods came from or was destined to ports located in the North Sea. Bulgaria and Romania on the Black Sea were other exceptions, with the largest share of short sea shipping going to or from the Mediterranean Sea (48 % and 52 % respectively). By comparison, countries with large ports that act as hub ports or trans-shipment points will tend to have substantial short sea shipping with ports in several sea regions.

Liquid bulk remained the dominant type of cargo in EU short sea shipping

As in previous years, liquid bulk remained the dominant type of cargo in EU short sea shipping. At 757 million tonnes, liquid bulk accounted for 42 % of the total short sea shipping of goods to and from main EU ports in 2019 (Figure 6). Liquid bulk was followed by dry bulk at 377 million tonnes (21 %), containers at 292 million tonnes (16 %) and roll on - roll off (Ro-Ro) units at 243 million tonnes (14 %).

For liquid bulk, the Netherlands had the largest volume of short sea shipping in 2019 (151 million tonnes), followed by Italy (139 million tonnes). Netherlands also led the EU rankings for short sea shipping of dry bulk goods (59 million tonnes). Spain was the main country in terms of short sea shipping of goods in containers (54 million tonnes) and Italy in terms of Ro-Ro units (60 million tonnes).

Figure 6: Short sea shipping of freight by type of cargo, 2019
(% share in tonnes)
Source: Eurostat (mar_sg_am_cwk)

Short sea shipping of liquid bulk goods was dominant in all sea regions in 2019, even though the composition of the short sea shipping cargo varies among the sea regions. While liquid bulk goods accounted for 55 % of total short sea shipping of goods in the Black Sea, the comparable figure for the Atlantic Ocean was only 30 % of the total. By contrast, the share of dry bulk goods in the short sea shipping of each sea region is more evenly distributed, with a range from 16 % in the Mediterranean Sea to 34 % in the Black Sea (Figure 7).

Figure 7: Short sea shipping of freight by type of cargo for each sea region of partner ports, EU-27, 2019
(% share in tonnes)
Source: Eurostat (mar_sg_am_ewx)

Goods transported in containers accounted for 22 % of the short sea cargo in the Mediterranean Sea in 2019, while it only made up 6 % of the short sea shipping in the Black Sea. Similarly, goods transported on Ro-Ro units accounted for 22 % of the short sea shipping in the Atlantic Ocean, due to the location of the main Ro-Ro ports. By contrast, short sea shipping of goods on Ro-Ro units barely registered in the Black Sea (less than 1 %).

The top 20 EU ports accounted for over 40% of EU short sea shipping

Unlike statistics presented earlier in this article, the figures at port level presented hereafter do not estimate the seaborne transport of goods between the main European ports and their partner ports in the short sea shipping area (where double-counting is excluded), but present the handling of short sea shipped goods in the main EU ports (see methodological notes).

The top 20 ports accounted for more than 40 % of the total short sea shipped goods handled in the main EU ports in 2019. Rotterdam remained the largest EU port for short sea shipping, handling a total of 204 million tonnes of short sea shipped goods in 2019. Among the other top three ports, Antwerpen handled 101 million tonnes of short shipped goods in 2019 and Amsterdam handled 53 million tonnes (Figure 8).

Figure 8: Top 20 short sea shipping EU-27 ports, 2009, 2018 and 2019
(million tonnes)
Source: Eurostat (mar_sg_am_pw)

Eight of the main deep sea hub ports, Rotterdam, Antwerpen, Amsterdam, Hamburg, Algeciras, Le Havre, Valencia and Barcelona, handled more deep sea shipping than short sea shipping of goods. By contrast, all the other top 20 ports for short sea shipping handled more short sea shipped goods than deep sea shipped goods (Figure 9). In particular, 99 % of the goods handled in the port of Dublin were short sea shipped.

Figure 9: Short sea shipping of freight in total sea transport for top 20 short sea shipping EU-27 ports, 2019
(% share in tonnes)
Source: Eurostat (mar_sg_am_pw)

At 114 million tonnes, Rotterdam handled 13 % of the total short sea shipped liquid bulk goods reported by the main EU ports in 2019, by far the largest volume of short sea shipped liquid bulk for any EU port (Figure 10).

Figure 10: Top 5 short sea shipping EU-27 ports for liquid bulk, 2009, 2018 and 2019
(million tonnes)
Source: Eurostat (mar_sg_am_pwl)

In 2019, the share of short sea shipped liquid bulk on the total sea transport of liquid bulk was particularly pronounced in the port of Trieste, with 83 % (Figure 11).

Figure 11: Short sea shipping of freight in total sea transport for top 5 short sea shipping EU-27 ports for liquid bulk, 2019
(% share in tonnes)
Source: Eurostat (mar_sg_am_pwl)


At almost 24 million tonnes in 2019, Amsterdam overtook Rotterdam to become the EU’s largest port for short sea shipping of dry bulk goods after an increase of 14.1 % in 2019 compared to the previous year (Figure 12).

Figure 12: Top 5 short sea shipping EU-27 ports for dry bulk, 2009, 2018 and 2019
(million tonnes)
Source: Eurostat (mar_sg_am_pwb)

In 2019, the share of short sea shipped dry bulk on the total sea transport of dry bulk was particularly pronounced in the ports of Riga and Ravenna, with both 74 % (Figure 13).

Figure 13: Short sea shipping of freight in total sea transport for top 5 short sea shipping EU-27 ports for dry bulk, 2019
(% share in tonnes)
Source: Eurostat (mar_sg_am_pwb)

Rotterdam remained the EU’s largest port for short sea shipped goods in containers with more than 44 million tonnes in 2019, but closely followed by Antwerpen which handled almost 44 million tonnes (Figure 14).

Figure 14: Top 5 short sea shipping EU-27 ports for containers, 2009, 2018 and 2019
(million tonnes)
Source: Eurostat (mar_sg_am_pwc)

In 2019, the share of short sea shipped goods in containers on the total sea transport of goods in containers was below 50% for all top 5 ports for containers handled, with the exception of Piraeus, with 60 % (Figure 15).

Figure 15: Short sea shipping of freight in total sea transport for top 5 short sea shipping EU-27 ports for containers, 2019
(% share in tonnes)
Source: Eurostat (mar_sg_am_pwc)

Calais remained the largest port for short sea shipped goods on Ro-Ro units with 18 million tonnes in 2019 despite a decrease of 4.4 % compared to the previous year (Figure 16). After a large increase of 16.3 % compared to 2018, the port of Livorno reached the fifth position in 2019 with almost 13 million tonnes of Ro-Ro units handled.

Figure 16: Top 5 short sea shipping EU-27 ports for roll-on and roll-off units, 2009, 2018 and 2019
(million tonnes)
Source: Eurostat (mar_sg_am_pwr)

In 2019, the goods on Ro-Ro units were exclusively short sea shipped in Calais, Dublin and Lubeck, while, in Zeebrugge and Livorno, short sea shipping of goods on Ro-Ro units represented 92 % and 94 % of the total sea transport of goods on Ro-Ro units (Figure 17).

Figure 17: Short sea shipping of freight in total sea transport for top 5 short sea shipping EU-27 ports for roll-on and roll-off units, 2019
(% share in tonnes)
Source: Eurostat (mar_sg_am_pwr)

Short sea shipping of containers in the main EU ports decreased by 1.9 % from 2018 to 2019

Unlike, for instance, the dry bulk segment, short sea shipping of goods in containers is concentrated around a limited number of main hub ports. In 2019, the top 5 ports for containers handled 39 % of the total short sea shipped container goods in main EU ports, in terms of gross weight of goods.

In terms of number of twenty-foot equivalent units (TEUs), short sea shipping of containers in the main EU ports decreased by 1.9 % from 2018 to 2019, to close to 33 million TEUs). While loaded containers decreased by 3.4 % in 2019 compared to the previous year, transport of empty containers increased by 4.1 %, to more than 7 million TEUs in 2019 (Figure 18). Please note that the figures and growth rates may be influenced by changes in data quality for certain countries (see methodological notes).

Figure 18: Short sea shipping of containers by loading status, EU-27, 2005-2019
(thousand TEUs)
Source: Eurostat (mar_sg_am_cv)

In 2019, Italy remained the major country for short sea shipped goods in containers in the EU, with 6.1 million TEUs, despite a dramatic decrease of 24.7 % in 2019 compared to the previous year. Spain followed with 5.8 million TEUs and then Germany with 5.4 million TEUs recorded in their main ports (Figure 19).

Decreases in 2019 compared with 2018 were observed in 13 out of 22 EU Member States. Besides Italy, the most noticeable decrease was observed for Cyprus (-7.0 %), followed by Lithuania (-5.8 %) and France (-4.9 %). By contrast, Croatia, Belgium, Poland, the Netherlands, Bulgaria and Greece all recorded growth rates of more than 9 % in short sea shipping of containers (in TEUs) compared with 2018.

Figure 19: Short sea shipping of containers, 2009, 2018 and 2019
(thousand TEUs)
Source: Eurostat (mar_sg_am_cv)

At EU level, the loaded containers represented 78 % of all containers short sea shipped (in TEUs) in 2019 (Figure 20). All reporting countries transported more loaded containers than empty ones. Italy had the highest share of loaded containers (92 %) while Cyprus had the lowest (62 %).

Figure 20: Short sea shipping of containers by loading status, 2019
(% share in TEUs)
Source: Eurostat (mar_sg_am_cv)

Source data for tables and graphs

Data sources

The statistics in this article are based on data collected within the framework of Directive 2009/42/EC of 6 May 2009 on statistical returns in respect of carriage of goods and passengers by sea. The relevant data on port of loading and unloading of the goods is mainly collected for main ports, passengers by sea. The relevant data on port of loading and unloading of the goods is mainly collected for main ports, which are defined as ports handling more than one million tonnes of goods annually. Data is collected at level of statistical ports.

The short sea shipping (SSS) statistics present seaborne transport of goods between main ports in the maritime EU Member States and partner ports situated in geographical Europe or in non-European countries on the Mediterranean and on the Black Sea. In consequence, the article covers short sea shipping of goods to and from main ports in the 22 maritime EU Member States (Czechia, Luxembourg, Hungary, Austria and Slovakia have no maritime ports), and ports situated in the maritime EFTA countries Iceland and Norway, the United Kingdom, the maritime candidate countries Montenegro, Albania and Turkey, the maritime potential candidate country Bosnia–Herzegovina and the remaining countries with ports situated on the Baltic (Russia), on the Mediterranean ( Algeria, Egypt, Israel, Lebanon, Libya, Morocco, Occupied Palestinian territories, Syria, and Tunisia) and on the Black Sea (Georgia, Moldova, Russia and Ukraine). In addition to the maritime EU Member States, similar short sea shipping statistics are also available for seaborne transport to and from main ports in Norway, the United Kingdom, Montenegro and Turkey.

The definition of short sea shipping is derived from the Communication of the Commission COM (1999) 317 on the development of Short Sea Shipping in Europe. In consequence, the concept of short sea shipping includes both regular short sea shipping and feeder services (short sea shipping between ports in order for freight to be consolidated or redistributed to or from a deep sea service in one of the ports in a network (hub ports). The category other seaborne transport in the tables and figures includes both deep sea shipping and transport with unidentified partner ports (unknown ports).

Sea regions

The following sea regions have been taken into account to group the short sea shipping partner ports: the Baltic, the North Sea, the Atlantic Ocean (including the English Channel and the Irish Sea), the Mediterranean and the Black Sea.

1. The Baltic:

  • Danish ports below the Helsingborg–Korsør–Nyborg–Kolding line (including Helsingor).
  • All ports of Finland, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania and Poland as well as German and Russian ports on the Baltic.
  • The Swedish ports on the Baltic from Helsingborg (included).

2. The North Sea:

  • All ports of Norway, the Netherlands and Belgium as well as the ports of Germany on the North Sea.
  • Swedish ports on the North Sea from Helsingborg (excluded).
  • Danish ports on north of the Helsingborg–Korsor–Nyborg–Kolding line and North Denmark (excluding Helsingor). Faroe Islands.
  • United Kingdom: ports on the east coast of Great Britain from Ramsgate (included) to Cape Wrath in Scotland, the Shetland Islands and Orkney Islands.

3. The Atlantic Ocean:

  • All ports of Ireland, Portugal (including Açores and Madeira) and Iceland.
  • French ports on the Atlantic Ocean and on the Channel, up to the Belgian border.
  • Spanish ports on the Atlantic Ocean to Tarifa (included); Canary Islands are included.
  • United Kingdom: ports of Great Britain on the Channel (from Ramsgate excluded) and the west coast to Cape Wrath in Scotland; ports in Northern Ireland.

4. The Mediterranean:

  • Spanish ports on the Mediterranean from Tarifa (excluded).
  • French ports on the Mediterranean.
  • All ports of Malta, Italy, Slovenia, Croatia, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Montenegro, Albania, Greece, Cyprus, Syria, Lebanon, Occupied Palestinian territory, Libya, Tunisia, Algeria and Gibraltar.
  • Ports of Morocco, Egypt and Israel on the Mediterranean.
  • Ports of Turkey on the Mediterranean (including the ports on the Bosporus).

5. The Black Sea:

  • All Black Sea ports excluding the ports on the Bosporus.

6. Others:

  • Non-identified ports of Denmark, Germany, Spain, France, Sweden, the United Kingdom, Israel, Morocco, Russia, Turkey and Egypt; river ports of EU countries.

Please note that ports located in Morocco–West Africa, Egypt–Red Sea, Israel–Red Sea and Russia–Barents and White Seas are not part of the European short sea shipping area.

Comparability over time and between countries

Exclusion of double counting

All the results shown in this publication are calculated on the basis of the statistics declared by main ports vis-à-vis their partner ports. In order to estimate the seaborne transport of goods between the ports, any double counting of the same cargo being declared by both the port of loading as outward movements of goods and the port of unloading as inwards movements of goods has to be excluded. In cases where data is collected for both the port of loading and the port of unloading, the double counting is excluded by only taking the inwards movements in ports into account when calculating the total transport on the maritime routes in question. The algorithm for this exclusion of double counting is applied at statistical port level.

The total SSS per country excludes the double counting in the national transport declarations. The total SSS for the EU-27 excludes the double counting of national and international intra-EU-27 transport declarations. The total aggregates per country may therefore differ from the sum of inwards and outwards declarations for the country. Similarly, the total aggregates for the EU-27 may differ from the sum of inwards and outwards declarations and also from the sum of the country totals.

Comparability over time

In 2006, data concerning transport to/from Russian ports located on the Barents Sea and the White Sea started being collected separately. Transport to/from these ports is not included in the definition of European short sea shipping. However, prior to 2006 this transport was most probably included in the reported transport to/from Russia. In the case of France, this structural change was implemented in 2007, which may imply a slight underestimation of the growth rates between 2006 and 2007 for the French short sea shipping.

Specific remarks on figures

Figures 1 and 2: The category ‘other seaborne transport’ includes both deep sea shipping and transport with unidentified partner ports (unknown ports). See specific country methodological notes hereafter for more details on the share of unknown reported by the countries over time.

Figures 6 and 7:

  • Liquid bulk: liquefied gas, crude oil, oil products and other liquid bulk goods.
  • Dry bulk: ores, coal, agricultural products (e.g. grain, soya, tapioca), other dry bulk goods.
  • Large containers: 20 ft freight units, 40 ft freight units, freight units > 20 ft and < 40 ft, freight units > 40 ft.
  • Ro-Ro mobile units:

a) Mobile self-propelled units: road goods vehicles and accompanying trailers, passenger cars, motorcycles and accompanying trailers/caravans, passenger buses, trade vehicles (including import/export motor vehicles), live animals on the hoof, other mobile self-propelled units.

b) Mobile non-self-propelled units: unaccompanied road goods trailers and semi-trailers, unaccompanied caravans and other road, agricultural and industrial vehicles, rail wagons, shipborne port-to-port trailers and shipborne barges engaged in goods transport, other mobile non-self-propelled units

  • Other cargo: forestry products, iron and steel products, other general cargo. The category ‘other cargo’ includes data for unknown type of cargo.

Figures 9, 11, 13, 15 and 17: The category ‘other seaborne transport’ includes both deep sea shipping and transport with unidentified partner ports (unknown ports). It should be noted that the share of unknown partner ports in the total seaborne transport is less than 5 % in 2009, 2018 and 2019 for all the mentioned ports, with the exception of Constanta in 2009 (9%). When looking at each type of cargo, this share is lower than 4 % for all ports, except Rotterdam for containers (8 % in 2018 and 9 % in 2019).

Country specific remarks

Explanatory notes for countries are available in the metadata on the Eurostat website. Additional information related to this article are mentioned hereafter.

Greece (EL) For container statistics, the data reported by Greece contain a significant share of declarations to and from unknown ports in 2005 (10 % ), 2006 (14 % ), 2007-2008 (10 % ), 2009 (11 %), 2010 (7 %), 2011, 2012 (5 %), 2013 (6 %), 2014 (5 %), while it fell to 2 % in 2015, less than 1 % in the period 2016-2018 and 1 % in 2019.

Spain (ES) The data reported by Spain contain a significant share of declarations to and from unknown ports in 2015 (10 % ), 2016 (11 % ), 2017 (15 % ) and 2018 (11 % ), while this percentage was only 4 % in 2014 and close to nil in previous years, as well as in 2019. For container statistics, the share of unknown partner ports was 9 % in 2005, 11 % 2006, 10 % in 2007, 8 % in 2008, 2009, 2010, 2012, 9 % in 2011, 7 % in 2013, 2014, 2019, 6 % in 2015 and 2018 and 5 % in 2016 and 2017.

France (FR) Taking into account the definition of European short sea shipping, the figures do not include transport with the French overseas territories (Départements d’Outre Mer/Collectivités d’Outre Mer). The quarterly data for port activity in France have been partially estimated by Eurostat for the period 2009-2016. In consequence, the data for France contain a higher share of declarations to and from unknown ports in 2012 (7 % ), in 2013 (8 % ) and in 2009, 2011 and 2016 (5 % ). This share is lower than 5 % for the other years. For container statistics, the share of unknown partner ports was 5 % in 2010, 2014 and 2017, 4 % in 2011 and 2015, 8 % in 2016 and 7 % in 2008, while it fell to about 1 % in 2012, 3 % in 2013 and was close to nil in other years. In 2019, the share rose up to 10 %.

Cyprus (CY) The data reported by Cyprus contain a significant share of declarations to and from unknown partner ports in 2011 (28 %), in 2010 (58 %), in 2009 (61 %), in 2008 (60 %), in 2007 (59 % ), in 2006 (68 % ), in 2005 (44 % ). Between 2012 and 2015, the share is lower than 2 %. In 2016, the share rose up to 9 % . In 2018 and 2017, the share was below 2 %. In 2019, the share was 2 %. This has several consequences: the volume of SSS and its share in total seaborne transport are probably underestimated in the earlier years and in 2016; change rates of SSS may not be reliable. The same is similarly applicable to container statistics, where the share of unknown partner ports is 22 % in 2011, 64 % in 2010, 68 % in 2009, 66 % in 2008, 67 % in 2007, 61 % in 2006 and 58 % in 2005. This share fell to 7% in 2012 and 2013, 3 % in 2014, 2 % in 2015, close to nil in 2016, 2018 and 2019. In 2017, the share was 2 % .

Netherlands (NL) For container statistics, the share of unknown partner ports was significant starting from 2011: 12 % in 2011, 32 % in 2012, 36 % in 2013, 41 % in 2014 and 42 % in 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018 and 2019. This has several consequences: the number of TEUs in SSS and its share in total seaborne transport are probably underestimated; growth rates of TEUs in SSS between consecutive years may not be reliable.

Portugal (PT) The data reported by Portugal contain a significant share of declarations to and from unknown ports in 2009 (13 % ), while this percentage was close to nil in the other years. This has several consequences: the volume of SSS and its share in total seaborne transport are probably underestimated; growth rates of SSS between consecutives years may not be reliable.

Romania (RO) The data reported by Romania contain a significant share of declarations to and from unknown partner ports: 5 % in 2013, 6 % in 2010, 2011 and 2012, 7 % in 2009, 13 % in 2008, 27 % in 2007, 21 % in 2006 and 15 % in 2005. This share fell to almost nil since 2014. This has several consequences: the volume of SSS and its share in total seaborne transport are probably underestimated in the earlier years; growth rates of SSS between consecutive years may not be reliable. The same is more specifically applicable to container statistics, where the share of unknown partner ports is 39 % in 2013, 51% in 2011 and 2012, 50 % in 2010, 48 % in 2009, 54 % in 2008, 95 % in 2007, 84 % in 2006 and 73 % in 2005. This share fell to 1 % in 2014, and close to nil since 2015.

Sweden (SE) The data reported by Sweden contain a significant share of declarations to and from unknown partner ports: 5 % in 2017, and 2019, 6 % in 2018, while it was below 2 % in the previous years. For container statistics, the share of unknown partner ports was 6 % in 2017 and 2018, 7 % in 2019, while it was below 3 % in the period 2009-2019 and 3 % in the period 2006-2008.

Context

The content of this statistical article is based on data collected within the framework of the EU maritime transport statistics Directive (Directive 2009/42/EC of 6 May 2009 on statistical returns in respect of carriage of goods and passengers by sea), which is a recast of the original Council Directive 95/64/EC of 8 December 1995.

The basic legal act (Directive 2009/42/EC) was amended by:

The following legal acts include respectively the last official version of the list of ports and some dissemination aspects:

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Maritime transport - main annual results (mar_m)
Maritime transport - short sea shipping - Main annual results (mar_s)
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Notes

  1. This increase might be influenced by the reduction of the reporting to/from unknown ports by Spain in 2019 compared to 2018 (see methodological notes).