Navigation path

Evidence based practices

This section features practices that have demonstrated their effectiveness through rigorous research. These practices have been reviewed by a team of experts and summarised in a way that is easy to understand.

Find a practice (within the 'Evidence based practices'):

The practices can be also searched along the three policy pillars of the Recommendation for Investing in Children:

What's new

1. Promoting Parental Leave
Sweden, 2002 - still operating

Sweden has implemented several reforms to their parental leave policy, with the aim of increasing the sharing of parental leave among mothers and fathers. Since 1974, Swedish parents have been able to take up to six months of paid leave after the birth of a child under the country’s parental leave insurance. The pay was equivalent to 90-percent of the parent’s earnings or was set at a flat rate if the parent had no prior earnings. Initially, parents could share this leave time as they preferred (i.e., one parent could take six months leave, both parents could take three months leave, or some other combination adding up to six months). By the 1990s, the allotted time had been extended to twelve months paid leave based on earnings and an additional three months paid at a flat rate. From the mid-nineties through 2008, Sweden enacted several additional reforms to parental leave insurance aimed at encouraging more gender equality in leave time among fathers and mothers. In 1995, one month of leave was reserved for each parent (i.e., if a given parent chose not to use his or her month of leave, that month was forfeited and the other parent could take only eleven months of leave). In 2002, this reserved leave was extended to two months per parent. Also in 2002, however, the full amount of leave time was increased to sixteen months (thirteen months at the earnings-related rate plus three months at a flat rate). This implied that although an additional month was reserved for each parent, the other parent could still take up to fourteen months of leave (Duvander and Johansson, 2010). Read more...

2. Online parenting support: Positive parents (Educar en positivo)
Spain, Unknown - Still operating

The ‘Positive parents’ platform is an online parenting programme that seeks to help parents improve their parenting skills and their relationship with their children. This practice has been implemented and evaluated in Spain. Read more...

3. Classroom-based cognitive behaviour therapy to prevent anxiety (FRIENDS programme)
United Kingdom, 2011 - Still operating

The FRIENDS protocol is designed to be delivered in both clinical and educational settings by teachers, psychologists, and allied health professionals. The programme is a manualised cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) intervention. It is based on the principles of CBT and aims to help children develop skills to counter the cognitive, emotional, and behavioural aspects of anxiety. It seeks to teach children to develop emotional awareness and regulation skills, identify and replace cognitions that increase anxiety with more balanced and functional ways of thinking, and to develop problem-solving skills to confront and cope with situations and events that provoke anxiety. Read more...

4. Raising the Achievement of Bilingual Learners in Primary Schools
United Kingdom, 2004 - Still operating

The practice was implemented in primary schools across the UK and consists in embedding and strengthening well-established English as Additional Language (EAL) pedagogy with the aim of raising achievement of bilingual learners, and increasing teacher confidence in meeting the needs of bilingual pupils. The practice consists of a wide range of teaching approaches that can be tailored to the needs of the school or teacher. It is not a new practice, although it is innovative in emphasising certain existing elements of EAL practice which are not common, such as enabling children to use their first language to learn. Read more...

5. Kiva Antibullying Programme
Finland, 2007 - still operating

The KiVa programme is a school-wide approach to decreasing the incidence and negative effects of bullying on student well-being at school.  The programme’s impact is measured through self and peer-rated reports of bullying, victimization, defending victims, feeling empathy towards victims, bystanders reinforcing bullying behaviour, anxiety, self-esteem, depression, liking school, and academic motivation and performance, among other factors.  The programme is based on the idea that how peer bystanders behave when witnessing bullying plays a critical role in perpetuating or ending the incident.  As a result, the intervention is designed to modify peer attitudes, perceptions, and understanding of bullying.  The programme specifically encourages students to support victimised peers rather than embolden bullying behaviour and, furthermore, provides teachers and parents with information about how to prevent and address the incidence of bullying. Read more...