Welcome To Statistics Explained

Statistics Explained, your guide to European statistics. Statistics Explained is an official Eurostat website presenting statistical topics in an easily understandable way. Together, the articles make up an encyclopedia of European statistics for everyone, completed by a statistical glossary clarifying all terms used and by numerous links to further information and the latest data and metadata, a portal for occasional and regular users.

To find the information you need, please select a theme from the menu below or use the coloured boxes on the right. The search function (alt-f) can also be used.

New / updated articles

This article focuses on the short-term evolutions in the nights spent at tourist accommodation in the European Union (EU). The data of the most recent reference month available (December 2014) are compared with the same month of the previous year. In addition, the article includes estimates for the annual comparison of the entire year 2014 with 2013. More ...
Eurostat disseminates early results for severe material deprivation rates so that trends in poverty levels can be tracked more closely. 2014 data are available for over half the EU Member States, and Iceland. The coverage and the timeliness is expected to increase in the coming years. More ...
This article presents statistics on net social protection expenditure in the EU. These statistics are collected through the European system of integrated social protection statistics (ESSPROS). More ...
Municipal waste statistics
Updated 26/03/2015
This article shows trends in municipal waste generation and treatment in the European Union (EU) from 1995 to 2013. There is a very distinct trend towards less landfilling as countries move steadily towards alternative ways of treating waste. Municipal waste accounts for only about 10 % of total waste generated when compared with the data reported according to the Waste Statistics Regulation (tab env_wasgen). More ...
Job vacancy statistics
Updated 20/03/2015
This article gives an overview of recent job vacancy statistics in the European Union (EU), notably the job vacancy rate (JVR). Job vacancy trends over the last decade are analysed in another article. The News Release with quarterly data on the job vacancy rate is available here. More ...
This article is part of an online publication and provides a description of the agriculture, forestry and fisheries sector in the European Union (EU) and in the six countries that together form the European Neighbourhood Policy-East (ENP-E) region, namely, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Georgia, Moldova and Ukraine. More ...

Did you know that....

In 2013, the share of employees working part-time was highest in the Netherlands (52.4 % of employees), followed by Germany (27.6 %) and Austria (26.5 %), while the lowest shares were recorded in Romania (0.7 %), Bulgaria (2.2 %) and Slovakia (5.1 %). Read more...

Focus on

Migration and migrant population statistics
Immigration by citizenship, 2012 YB14 II.png
This article presents European Union (EU) statistics on international migration, population stocks of national and foreign (non-national) citizens and data relating to the acquisition of citizenship. Migration is influenced by a combination of economic, political and social factors: either in a migrant’s country of origin (push factors) or in the country of destination (pull factors). Historically, the relative economic prosperity and political stability of the EU are thought to have exerted a considerable pull effect on immigrants.

In destination countries, international migration may be used as a tool to solve specific labour market shortages. However, migration alone will almost certainly not reverse the ongoing trend of population ageing experienced in many parts of the EU.

Main statistical findings

Migration flows

Immigration to the EU-27 was 1.7 million in 2012

During 2012, there were an estimated 1.7 million immigrants to the EU-27 from countries outside the EU-27. In addition, 1.7 million people previously residing in one of the EU Member States migrated to another Member State.

Thus, about 3.4 million people immigrated to one of the EU-27 Member States, while at least 2.7 million emigrants were reported to have left an EU-27 Member State. It should be noted that the two figures above do not represent the migration flows to / from the EU as a whole, since they also include flows between different EU Member States.

Germany reported the largest number of immigrants (592 200) in 2012, followed by the United Kingdom (498 000), Italy (350 800), France (327 400) and Spain (304 100). Spain reported the highest number of emigrants in 2012 (446 600), followed by the United Kingdom (321 200), France (288 300) and Poland (275 600). A total of 14 of the EU-27 Member States reported more immigration than emigration in 2012. However, in Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Ireland, Greece, Spain, Cyprus, Poland, Portugal, Romania and the three Baltic Member States, emigrants outnumbered immigrants, as they did in Croatia.

More ...