Welcome To Statistics Explained

Statistics Explained, your guide to European statistics. Statistics Explained is an official Eurostat website presenting statistical topics in an easily understandable way. Together, the articles make up an encyclopedia of European statistics for everyone, completed by a statistical glossary clarifying all terms used and by numerous links to further information and the latest data and metadata, a portal for occasional and regular users.

To find the information you need, please select a theme from the menu below or use the coloured boxes on the right. The search function (alt-f) can also be used.

New / updated articles

Unemployment statistics
Updated 01/09/2015
This article presents the very latest unemployment figures for the European Union (EU), the euro area and individual Member States, complemented by an overview of long-term developments since the year 2000. Unemployment levels and rates move in a cyclical manner, largely related to the general business cycle. However, other factors such as labour market policies and demographic developments may also influence the short and long-term evolution. More ...
Monitoring sustainable development is a bi-annual Eurostat publication, also downloadable in pdf format (latest edition 2015, ISBN: 978-92-79-49391-1). The articles are updated every two years, when the new edition of the publication appears. More ...
This article presents recent data on both the geographical and sectoral aspects of the maritime economy of the European Union (EU). The maritime economy is now often referred to as the ‘blue economy’. It covers all marketable activities linked to the sea. More ...
Inflation in the euro area
Updated 31/08/2015
The data in this article show the most recent annual rates of change for the euro area headline inflation and its main components issued by Eurostat. The figures presented are early estimates of euro area inflation. More ...
This article is part of a set of statistical articles based on the Eurostat regional yearbook publication. It presents regional agricultural statistics within the European Union (EU) and provides a selection of Eurostat’s statistics within this domain, including data covering the agricultural census and livestock numbers, as well as agricultural products. It begins with a special section that is devoted to information on a range of agri-environmental indicators in order to celebrate the international year of soils. More ...
This article analyses the tourism trends of the 2014-2015 winter season[1] in the European Union (EU) Member States, EFTA and candidate countries. In terms of nights spent at hotels and similar accommodation establishments, tourism recorded positive growth rates in most countries, compared with the same period in 2013-2014. More ...

Did you know that....

On average, a girl born in the EU-28 in 2012 could expect to live 83.1 years, while the corresponding life expectancy at birth for a newly-born boy was 5.6 years lower, at 77.5 years. Read more...

Focus on

Population statistics at regional level
Population density, by NUTS 3 regions, 2012 (1) (inhabitants per km²) RYB14.png
This article is part of a set of statistical articles based on the Eurostat regional yearbook publication. It describes regional demographic patterns across the European Union (EU). The content of this article is based on data from a population and housing census conducted in 2011, rather than regional demography statistics (which have been the source of information traditionally used in the Eurostat regional yearbook)

The census is a very detailed source of data and includes information for some variables down to the level of municipalities; for the purpose of this article the data has been aggregated in order to be able to present data at NUTS level 2 or level 3 so as to provide coherent information in the form of maps across the whole of the EU.

Main statistical findings

This article, based on data from a population and housing census conducted in 2011, looks at a range of demographic issues, focusing on: the movement of individuals both into and within the EU; single-person households; and the formation of different types of family units.

More ...
  1. The winter season runs from November to April of the following year. For example, the 2014/2015 winter season ran from November 2014 to April 2015.

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