Welcome To Statistics Explained

Statistics Explained, your guide to European statistics. Statistics Explained is an official Eurostat website presenting statistical topics in an easily understandable way. Together, the articles make up an encyclopedia of European statistics for everyone, completed by a statistical glossary clarifying all terms used and by numerous links to further information and the latest data and metadata, a portal for occasional and regular users.

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New / updated articles

This article is part of the Eurostat online publication Tourism trips of Europeans providing recent statistics on tourism demand in the European Union (EU) and EFTA countries. The article takes a closer look at trips that EU residents (aged 15 and over) made in 2013, with a focus on the characteristics of these trips. Specific aspects such as top destinations, More ...
This article presents recent statistics on the acquisition of citizenship in the European Union (EU). In 2013, 984 800 people obtained citizenship of an EU-28 Member State, an increase of 20 % compared with 2012; More people had acquired the citizenship of an EU Member State than in any other year during the period from 2002 to 2012. The main contribution to the increase at EU level came from Spain (+131 700), followed by Italy (+35 300), the United Kingdom (+13 600) and Greece (+9 200). The increase in Spain, however, is a consequence of a change in the source of information, concept and time reference. More ...
Currently there are 24 official languages recognised within the European Union (EU), in addition to which there are regional, minority languages, and languages spoken by migrant populations. More ...
Inflation in the euro area
Updated 30/06/2015
The data in this article show the most recent annual rates of change for the euro area headline inflation and its main components issued by Eurostat. The figures presented are early estimates of euro area inflation. More ...
Unemployment statistics
Updated 30/06/2015
This article presents the very latest unemployment figures for the European Union (EU), the euro area and individual Member States, complemented by an overview of long-term developments since the year 2000. Unemployment levels and rates move in a cyclical manner, largely related to the general business cycle. However, other factors such as labour market policies and demographic developments may also influence the short and long-term evolution. More ...
This article is part of the Eurostat online publication Tourism trips of Europeans, which provides recent statistics on tourism demand in the European Union (EU) and EFTA countries. The article analyses participation in tourism (sometimes called 'tourism propensity'), i.e. the proportion of a given population that makes at least one tourism trip of a specified minimum duration in a given reference period. More ...

Did you know that....

In 2013, the expected number of healthy life years at birth was higher for women than for men in 16 of the 28 EU Member States, with the difference exceeding 3 years in Estonia, Poland and Bulgaria and ranging up to 5 years in Lithuania. Read more...

Focus on

Population statistics at regional level
Population density, by NUTS 3 regions, 2012 (1) (inhabitants per km²) RYB14.png
This article is part of a set of statistical articles based on the Eurostat Regional Yearbook publication. It describes regional demographic patterns across the European Union (EU). Statistics on regional demography are one of the few areas where detailed NUTS 3 information is collected and published for each of the EU Member States. At the time of writing, the latest information is available for vital demographic events (births and deaths) and a range of demographic indicators generally through to the end of 2012, although earlier reference periods have been used for some countries (principally Ireland, Romania and the United Kingdom — see the footnotes under each map or figure for more information).

Demographic changes in the European Union (EU) are likely be of considerable importance in the coming decades as the vast majority of models concerning future population trends suggest that the EU’s population will continue to age, due to consistently low fertility levels and extended longevity. Although migration plays an important role in the population dynamics of European countries, migration alone will almost certainly not reverse the ongoing trend of population ageing experienced in many parts of the EU. The social and economic consequences associated with population ageing are likely to have profound implications across Europe, both nationally and regionally. For example, low fertility rates will lead to a reduction in the number of students in education, there will be fewer working-age persons to support the remainder of the population, and a higher proportion of elderly persons (some of whom will require additional infrastructure, healthcare services and adapted housing). These structural demographic changes could impact on the capacity of governments to raise tax revenue, balance their own finances, or provide adequate pensions and healthcare services.

Main statistical findings

There were 505.7 million inhabitants living in the EU-28 at the start of 2013; there were almost 100 million additional inhabitants when compared with aggregated 1960 population figures for the EU-28 Member States. Between the start of 2012 and the start of 2013, the EU-28’s population increased by 1.1 million (or 0.2 %).

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