Welcome To Statistics Explained

Statistics Explained, your guide to European statistics. Statistics Explained is an official Eurostat website presenting statistical topics in an easily understandable way. Together, the articles make up an encyclopedia of European statistics for everyone, completed by a statistical glossary clarifying all terms used and by numerous links to further information and the latest data and metadata, a portal for occasional and regular users.

To find the information you need, please select a theme from the menu below or use the coloured boxes on the right. The search function (alt-f) can also be used.

New / updated articles

Municipal waste statistics
Updated 26/03/2015
This article shows trends in municipal waste generation and treatment in the European Union (EU) from 1995 to 2013. There is a very distinct trend towards less landfilling as countries move steadily towards alternative ways of treating waste. Municipal waste accounts for only about 10 % of total waste generated when compared with the data reported according to the Waste Statistics Regulation (tab env_wasgen). More ...
This article takes a look at long-term trends in the number of lives lost in road traffic accidents in the European Union (EU), down to the regional level for the latest year available. The total number of fatalities in road traffic accidents decreased by 61 % between 1990 and 2012 (Figure 1) at the level of the EU-28 and by 51 % since 2000 (Target expressed in the European Commission’s White Paper: -50% between 2000 and 2010). More ...
This article is part of an online publication and provides a description of the agriculture, forestry and fisheries sector in the European Union (EU) and in the six countries that together form the European Neighbourhood Policy-East (ENP-E) region, namely, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Georgia, Moldova and Ukraine. More ...
Job vacancy statistics
Updated 20/03/2015
This article gives an overview of recent job vacancy statistics in the European Union (EU), notably the job vacancy rate (JVR). Job vacancy trends over the last decade are analysed in another article. The News Release with quarterly data on the job vacancy rate is available here. More ...
E-commerce statistics
Updated 20/03/2015
This article focuses on the electronic commerce (e-commerce) statistics in the European Union (EU) and is based on the results of the 2014 Community survey on 'ICT usage and e-commerce in enterprises'. E-commerce refers here to the trading of goods or services over computer networks such as the internet. It can be divided into e-commerce sales (e-sales) and e-commerce purchases (e-purchases) according to the way in which an enterprise receives or places orders respectively. More ...
The labour cost index (LCI) shows the short-term development of the labour cost, the total cost on an hourly basis of employing labour. In other words, the LCI measures the cost pressure arising from the production factor “labour”. This article takes a look at the most recent evolutions of the LCI, both at the level of the European Union (EU) and the Member States. More ...

Did you know that....

In 2013, the share of employees working part-time was highest in the Netherlands (52.4 % of employees), followed by Germany (27.6 %) and Austria (26.5 %), while the lowest shares were recorded in Romania (0.7 %), Bulgaria (2.2 %) and Slovakia (5.1 %). Read more...

Focus on

Income distribution statistics
At-risk-of-poverty rate before and after social transfers, 2012 (1) (%) YB14 II.png
This article analyses recent statistics on monetary poverty and income inequalities in the European Union (EU). Comparisons of standards of living between countries are frequently based on gross domestic product (GDP) per capita, which presents in monetary terms how rich one country is compared with another. However, this headline indicator says very little about the distribution of income within a country and also fails to provide information in relation to non-monetary factors that may play a significant role in determining the quality of life of a particular population. On the one hand, inequalities in income distribution may create incentives for people to improve their situation through work, innovation or acquiring new skills. On the other hand, such income inequalities are often viewed as being linked to crime, poverty and social exclusion.

Main statistical findings

At-risk-of-poverty rate and threshold

In 2012, 17.0 % of the EU-28 population was assessed to be at-risk-of-poverty after social transfers (see Figure 1). This share, calculated as a weighted average of national results, conceals considerable variations across the EU Member States. In five Member States, namely Greece (23.1 %), Romania (22.6 %), Spain (22.2 %), Bulgaria (21.2 %) and Croatia (20.5 %), one fifth or more of the population was viewed as being at-risk-of-poverty. The lowest proportions of persons at-risk-of-poverty were observed in the Netherlands (10.1 %) and the Czech Republic (9.6 %). Norway (10.1 %) and Iceland (7.9 %) also reported relatively low shares of their respective populations as being at-risk-of-poverty.

More ...