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Horizon 2020
The EU Framework Programme for Research and Innovation.
For more on project funding and the Horizon 2020 Programme, visit the H2020 web site

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 Research Information Centre

Updated: Fri, 01 Aug 2014  

Here are some of the most recent articles to be published. Select a theme or country from the menus on the left to see more articles - or choose Headlines or Success stories from the menu above.

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Photo of a scientist in the lab
  New technologies for disease indicator identification
Smart new technologies for characterising cellular components, collectively known as omics, offer the potential for great advances in the evaluation of an individual's risk of developing disease. However, their use in the study of the risk of disease associated with exposure to environmental factors is still in its infancy.

picture of the plane above the sea
  From sunlight to jet fuel: EU project makes first 'solar' kerosene
An EU-funded research project called SOLAR-JET has produced the world's first 'solar' jet fuel from water and carbon dioxide (CO2), a promising technology for a better energy security and turning possibly a greenhouse gas into a useful resource.

picture of blue board covered with figures and charts
  Arithmetical surprises from the quantum universe.
The classical notion of trajectory in physics has its foundation in common sense: the position and the velocity of an object can be predicted by computations and measured at a given time. As opposed to the classical universe, the behaviour of elementary particles is elusive. Only the probabilities of physical events can be predicted. These probabilities are sums of all possible trajectories of the quantum system from the initial to the final state.

Photo of a stormy sea
  Building high performance, low cost radar system
Since the ancient Greeks first began collecting rainwater in pots in about 500 BC, little has changed in how basic rainfall records are made. While there are more precise measurement methods, for example by using parts of multi-purpose radars operated by large weather services, they are complex and expensive for local users. Now, an alternative is possible thanks to a European Union (EU)-funded research project developing an accurate, affordable, real time, and user-friendly system to monitor both the spatial distribution and the intensity of rain.

picture of green olives
  Farmers 1 – fruit flies 0
Farmers around the world are united in their loathing of fruit flies. A new warning system developed by an EU-funded project to alert them of imminent infestation could save struggling farmers both time and money – and cut down on pesticide use. Two companies are preparing to commercialise the results.

Photo of a pair of hands holding a crystal ball for a baby's hand to touch
  How our environment can shape us
In Europe, reproductive health problems in men such as poor semen quality, testicular cancer, and genital birth defects are common. These issues seem to be the result of maldevelopment and malfunction in the testes of the foetus, the so-called testicular dysgenesis syndrome (TDS), which evidence suggests may be caused by exposure to environmental chemicals.

Illustration of cancerous cells
  At the threshold of personalised cancer treatment
New tumour profiling methods developed by EU-funded researchers aim to help doctors adjust treatments for colorectal cancer to the specific needs of an individual patient. The methods are currently at the trial stage and could be in use in clinics within three years.

picture of healty meal
  Stepping up the fight against food contamination
They may sound exotic or obscure to most of us, but they are an integral part of our everyday lives, whether we know about them or not. Known as perfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS), they are chemical compounds which are used in a wide variety of industrial products, from food and drink packaging to fire-fighting foams, to dirt- or water-proofing treatments for carpets or clothing. The drawback is that these chemicals have now spread throughout the environment.

Photo of scientists with plants
  Talking Plants
Plants communicate using their own language, made up of electrical signals, they send messages to other plants and to the environment. In Florence, a European research project is analysing this electrical activity.

Photo of the propeller of an aircraft
  Research to help reduce the risk of aircraft accidents
Automation is supposed to relieve an aircraft pilot's workload and reduce errors. The reality can unfortunately be very different sometimes. When the pilot and the aircraft do not interact as foreseen, automation technology can be the cause of disturbing instability, which has resulted in catastrophic failures. Tools and techniques developed by the EU-funded ARISTOTEL project are already being used by industry, and should reduce the risk of such accidents.

picture of a person with a heart attack
  Using nanotechnology to prevent heart attacks and strokes
By using nanotechnology to diagnose and deliver drugs early and effectively to patients at risk of cardiovascular disease, the EU-funded NanoAthero project promises to save lives.

Photo of a research scientist with a petri dish
  Defining biomarkers to spot bladder cancer
The European FP7 project DeCanbio brought together a consortium of clinicians and researchers in genomics, proteomics and bioinformatics to identify and validate biomarkers that hint at a recurring bladder cancer. The Centre de Recherche de la Santé (CRP-Santé) joined forces with researchers and clinicians from France, Spain, Greece, Switzerland, and Germany to develop a simple test to spot this.

Photo of colourful jellyfish
  How to protect Europe's seas
Increasing pressures on Europe's marine and coastal areas, particularly around the Mediterranean and the Black Sea, highlight the need for these areas to become more resilient to human activities and natural change. There is a large scientific research effort already underway to identify some of the environmental baselines, but the challenge now lies in turning that knowledge into effective decision-making.

Photo of a microscope
  A fourth generation laser that is pushing research boundaries
The scientific community has expressed an increased need for radiation sources capable of producing ultrashort pulses, with extreme brightness and coherence. In fact, this according to experts is where the future lies in terms of new materials characterisation, life science applications, drug development and many other applications.

Photo of colourful fruit candy
  Building a surveillance system for food chemicals
Mounting consumer concerns about food safety in recent years have raised questions about what we eat and drink. European authorities have some basic tools for risk assessment and risk management of food chemicals, but data is patchy and limited. The European Union (EU)-funded project FACET helped design a software tool that provides consumers with the best possible scientific data about the food supply.


  Establishing a systems medicine approach
Imagine you are ill and see the doctor. After a brief examination and blood analysis, you receive an efficient, personalised treatment that is adjusted to both your personal physiological makeup and your lifestyle. What sounds like science fiction today could soon come closer to reality with the help of the FP7 project CASyM, funded by the European Union.

  Multi-physics-the great unknown
A large number of engineering applications involve granular material or a particulate phase in combination with a gaseous or liquid phase. Applications for this kind of materials mix can be found in diverse domains such as the pharmaceutical industry, the food and processing industry, energy production or systems biology. Everyday products such as coffee, corn flakes, nuts or fertilizer all depend on this field of knowledge known as multi-physics.

  Packing raspberries with healthy antioxidants
EU researchers have developed new techniques to boost antioxidant levels in raspberries. Their work will help farmers grow healthier raspberries, for your table, your picnic basket and for markets worldwide.

  Peering into nano-objects-in 3D
These days, we rely increasingly on the most microscopic of mechanisms, machines and modules. Yet until recently it hasn't been possible to take a close look non-destructively without using large-scale research equipment. A new affordable scanner designed by EU researchers gives a 3D view inside nano-objects, and so will advance materials research.

  Tracking the history of hepatitis C to help tackle epidemics
Gkikas Magiorkinis, a clinical research fellow from the Department of Zoology at Oxford University in the United Kingdom, has traced history at a microscopic level. By combining epidemiological and molecular data, he has shown how hepatitis C spreads in a population, underlining early diagnosis as a key to preventing the spread of epidemics.

  Roadmap for smarter, greener manufacturing machines
The EU-funded NEXT project brought together manufacturers and machine-tool developers to develop a new, modern approach to production machinery. The project delivered new process automation concepts and machine designs for faster, greener manufacturing, allowing production lines to be more easily adapted to changing demand.

  Fish of the future
One out of every two fish which we eat has not been caught in the sea but raised on a farm. Can aquaculture make fish tastier and more environmentally friendly? An experimental fish farming facility near Brest in France is taking part in a European project to connect aquaculture research centres across the EU.

  Synthetic rubber repairs itself
A new synthetic rubber developed by EU-unded researchers repairs itself. That means longer-lasting components, plus reduced maintenance costs and waste. The rubber will initially be used for reducing rail and traffic noise, with many more applications to follow.

  The smartphone app that helps patients with bipolar disorder
For most people today, the rapid development of mobile computing and smartphones and the way these have revolutionised our daily lives is a familiar story.

  Algae and Olives
We are only aware of about 10% of our brain activity, so scientists at a lab in Barcelona are working to increase that percentage. They hope to enable us to perform better in a world which is increasingly overwhelmed by data.

  Working towards greener engines
The global car industry faces a big challenge to develop engines that are both efficient and environmentally friendly. But a family-owned Austrian company is hoping to find an answer through research into new technologies like hydrogen fuel cells and nanocomposites.

  Pioneering nanotech approach to help people hear
Around 50 million EU citizens are deaf or hard of hearing. The EU-funded NANOEAR project has built up knowledge and processes that could improve their ability to hear. The results include a novel nanoparticle-based system with the potential to restore hearing, repair tissue and increase performance of cochlear implants. A nano-hearing implant could be available within 10 years.

  Placing Europe at the forefront of marine biodiversity conservation
The variety of life contained in our oceans plays a vital role in preserving the planet’s equilibrium and in contributing to human quality of life. Healthy marine ecosystems provide a range of precious services.

  Gold Medal at the Paris international Concours Lépine to Vigi'Fall
Mr. Gérard Dorey has awarded to the Vigi'Fall on behalf of the jury of the Paris international Concours Lépine the Gold Medal which rewards the most promising inventions of the 2014 edition. The Concours Lépine rewards a highly innovative invention. Founded in 1901 by the Chief of Police Louis Lépine, the Concours Lépine is an outstanding economic tool. The ball-point pen, the potato-masher and the steam-iron have been rewarded there!

  Mapping greenhouse emissions to prevent climate change
EU-funded researchers have used advanced modelling and geo-spatial information to compile more accurate greenhouse gas inventories for Poland and Ukraine. The approach could substantially improve the accuracy of national inventories of greenhouse gases and boost Europe's efforts to reduce emissions.


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Other top stories

  Why cancer drugs affect young children differently

  Safer designs for ultra-large container ships

  New tools to fight tuberculosis and other chronic infections

  A new biodegradable product for environmentally friendly crops

  Researchers study the effects of air pollution on European ecosystems


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