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22/10/2012
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On 13 September 2011, the European Commission launched a public consultation which will help define the research landscape in Europe by identifying the main bottlenecks in creating a genuine single market for knowledge, research and innovation. The consultation runs until 30 November 2011 and the Commission will use the insight gained to elaborate its proposal for an enhanced ERA Framework that will be published before the end of 2012, with the goal of achieving the European Research Area by 2014, as mandated by the Council in February 2011.

The ERA Framework public consultation is online and more than 100,000 research stakeholders from all over Europe and beyond have been invited to participate. The Commissioner for Research, Innovation and Science, Máire Geoghegan-Quinn invites you to participate (1.1MB).

Have your say! : participate in the consultation by filling the online questionnaire.

The contributions received will be published on this website as well as a summary report (more information will be available in the coming weeks).

The results of the consultation will be presented on the occasion of an open event in Brussels on 30 January 2012.

Why a public Consultation?
The public consultation will take place from 13 September to 30 November to hear the views and suggestions from the research actors themselves on the barriers they face and what needs to be done. The public consultation is the first major step in the development of the Commission's ERA Framework by 2012. It will be key for the acceptance and success of the proposed ERA Framework that the whole chain of research actors engage in the development of the ERA Framework.

Why do we need to strengthen the European Research Area?
So far, fragmentation of research prevents Europe from fulfilling its potential and fully exploiting European skills and resources for the benefit of the consumers and citizens. A new level of ambition is necessary to improve Europe’s performance in research and make it commensurate with EU aspirations for leadership and excellence.