Horn of Africa: Better Migration Management (BMM) creates platform to better link victims of trafficking to different support services

NEWS | 21 February 2019

Few organisations have the capacity to provide all the services that a victim of trafficking may need, such as shelter, emergency medical care, legal assistance, short term financial assistance, family tracing, skills training, and psychosocial support. In order to close this gap, the Better Migration Management (BMM) Programme is funding the first ever mapping of agencies and organisations providing essential services to victims of trafficking across Kenya, Ethiopia, Somaliland and Djibouti. In the long run, this project will result in a web platform through which legal aid providers can research and refer migrants to the different services available. For example, a legal aid in Kenya will be able to find an emergency shelter for a Sudanese client whilst also helping them reach the victim's family back in Sudan.

The project, which is being developed through the subcontractor Sayara International, will translate into faster service provision, partnerships and exchange of knowledge between agencies and organisations, and ultimately benefit the service provision for victims of trafficking.

No comprehensive mapping of trafficking service providers had been conducted in any of the countries to-date. So far, service providers had been working through informal networks and personal contact lists, without having the full picture of the services available.

Background

The Horn of Africa is characterised by significant population movements through both regular and irregular channels. Most migrants and refugees from the Horn of Africa travel within the region, but many also find their way along several major migration routes through Kenya, Ethiopia, Somaliland and Djibouti heading toward Europe or the Gulf States. Along the way, many of these migrants are vulnerable to human trafficking, defined as the exploitation of human beings for purposes of profit. The scope of the problem is difficult to quantify as trafficking generally takes place in the shadows and data collection is a challenge.

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