Mobility and Transport

Clean transport, Urban transport

1.8 Cycle streets

1.8 Cycle streets

Overview

A cycle street (or boulevard) is a main cycle route that is open to motorised traffic but prioritises the needs of cyclists over other road users by providing cyclists with a high level of service.

Considerations for applicability

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Level of cycling

Implementation of cycle streets is most suited to routes where high volumes of people cycling exist or are anticipated.

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Urban layout/topography

Implementation of cycle streets is most suited to main cycle routes, such as commuter or student travel corridors.

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Population

N/A

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Finance resources

The initial capital required to implement cycle streets will vary depending on the extent of the infrastructure required, including length of road, materials used and changes required. It is likely that costs will relate primarily to signage and other features that ensure cycle priority. Finance will be required for ongoing maintenance.

It has been estimated that cycle streets could cost between €120k and £230k per km for basic provision, but up to £500k per km if more expensive materials are specified (Sustrans, 2014)

Oss Cycle Street in the Netherlands is about 2.5km long and cost €2 million to implement.

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Time & human resources

The time and human resources required to implement cycle streets will vary depending on the extent of the infrastructure required. An important consideration is the time required for the planning stages, including engaging with local stakeholders.

Measure impact highlight

Public transport, bus and cyclist Modal share

Cycle streets may contribute to an increase in the modal share of cycling when implemented as part of a cycling network or strategy within a city. Malmö's (Sweden) cycle street saw an increase in the number of cyclists, as well as improved travel time, comfort, and road safety conditions for cyclists. An evaluation of a cycle street in Oss (Netherlands) in 2004 found that cycling increased by 11% while motorised traffic reduced by 30% (Sustrans, 2014).

Note: An overview of the direct and indirect impacts resulting from correctly implemented cycling measures is available in Challenges that cities face and how cycling can address them.

In-depth measure analysis, case studies and further guidance