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Using hydrogen to reduce industry’s carbon footprint

The steel industry is one of the world’s biggest greenhouse gas emitters. To change this, the EU and industry-funded H2Future project is showing how a steel production plant can operate using green hydrogen made from renewable electricity. Once finalised, this new technology could play a key role in helping Europe meet its goal of becoming climate-neutral by 2050.

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Tasty, safe and sustainable: seafood as it should be

The list of innovations brought about by the EU-funded SEAFOODTOMORROW project is impressive. Project outcomes range from new production and processing methods, tailor-made healthy seafood and smartphone apps for consumers. Thanks to the project’s efforts, consumers and citizens can now benefit from higher quality, safer, more transparent and more sustainable seafood products.

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Promoting gender equality in science and technology

In Europe, women remain grossly under-represented in research and innovation. The EU-funded GEECCO project has been working with universities and research organisations to take a better approach to increasing their role in these fields. As a result, some participants have already significantly improved their gender balance, boosting research to the benefit of EU citizens – men and women alike.

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Creating new collaborative opportunities in Additive Manufacturing

Additive Manufacturing creates cost-effective, complex parts for many industries. However, many businesses and institutions lack the necessary knowledge and experience to benefit from it. The EU-funded INEX-ADAM project aims to share best practices and encourage collaborations through a dedicated industrial platform that will strengthen European industry, boost the economy and benefit citizens.

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A Strategic Research agenda links the ocean with human health

Humanity is realising that the state of our oceans has a direct impact on our wellbeing. To identify key priorities in the field of oceans and human health, the EU-funded SOPHIE project created a network of diverse experts. By changing harmful behaviours and encouraging sustainable practices, they hope to contribute to better health for both the oceans and citizens across Europe and beyond.

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Upcycling innovation to extract value from biowaste

Too much waste ends up in landfill, removing potentially reusable resources from the economy. To address this, the EU-funded VOLATILE project has developed a process for transforming biological waste which can then be used in a range of industries. This could deliver products with real added value for EU citizens, such as biofuel and bioplastics, as well as soap and Omega-3 oils.

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Planting the seeds of a sustainable organic farming future

Farmers need access to suitable organic seed but there is a lack of high-quality organic seeds in Europe. The EU-funded LIVESEED project addressed this by developing a new organic seed quality strategy, a Europe-wide seed database and sustainable breeding techniques that target specific farming conditions. By strengthening the EU’s organic agriculture, these results will benefit all citizens.

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Using twinning to strengthen Croatia’s institutional research capabilities in geoscience

To strengthen its research capabilities, the Croatian Geological Survey turned to twinning. Through the EU-funded GeoTwinn project it was paired with two other world-leading research institutions and received personalised training in geoscience research. They now have the internal capacity and skills to investigate geological hazards that will benefit not only Croatians but all EU citizens.

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A clever shortcut to useful innovations in healthcare

A new innovative model allows health organisations across Europe to access new technologies through collaboration with IT companies. Some 22 solutions improving healthcare staff and patients’ daily lives have been developed using this model by the EU-funded inDemand project. And more will come soon, promising an even bigger boost in the drive to provide citizens with high-quality healthcare.

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A new approach to studying ocean ecology

Science has long held that in the food chain, plants support animals. While this may be true on land, the EU-funded MixITiN project has shown that such a system isn’t applicable to our oceans. The project hopes that its findings will help to improve knowledge and thus broader education efforts on marine ecology, allowing citizens to gain a better understanding of the ocean’s great wonders.

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