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Spin waves for next-generation computing

Scientists are currently working to develop next-generation computer systems which can process information quickly and flexibly but are also energy-efficient. The EU-funded SWING project also actively contributed to this goal. Their research has produced an innovative new method that could prove key to bringing these 'super computers' from the drawing board to reality.

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Novel silicon lasers promise semiconductor revolution

An EU-funded project is enabling efficient intra-chip and chip-to-chip communication via a new type of silicon capable of emitting light. It is demonstrating a technological breakthrough that could revolutionise the electronics industry and make devices faster and much more energy efficient.

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Novel nanostructures could make smartphones more efficient

EU-funded researchers and partners are pushing the boundaries of the laws of physics, developing nanocomposite materials and nanoelectronic circuits to greatly improve energy, thermal and computing performance. This could make smartphones and other electronics more efficient and boost the potential of solar power.

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A tiny battery solution with huge potential for Europe

Pioneering EU-funded research on new solid-state batteries is paving the way for tiny yet powerful batteries for safer and better space applications. Industry partners are advancing with plans to commercialise the thin-film energy-storage technologies and processes at the heart of the project.

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New magnetic liquids to convert waste heat into energy

EU-funded researchers are developing new liquid magnetic materials that convert waste heat into electricity. The long-term aim for these materials, which are both affordable and environmentally friendly, is to use them to harness waste thermal energy to reduce energy consumption and help tackle the global energy crisis.

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