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Sea, sun … and science

Researchers fix fragments of coral onto an underwater nursery in French Polynesia. © CNRS Photothèque  - VIGNAUD Thomas - USR3278
Researchers fix fragments of coral onto an underwater nursery in French Polynesia. © CNRS Photothèque - VIGNAUD Thomas - USR3278

As Europeans head to the beaches for their summer holidays, Horizon takes a look at the science of the Mediterranean.

For our Sea, Sun … and Science issue we speak to the scientists who helped develop the idea for a synchrotron being built in the Middle East and bringing together researchers from across the region.

We interview a researcher who discovered unexpectedly large swarms of jellyfish in the Mediterranean while checking ocean acidity. And we find out how smart biosensors could help prevent contamination of drinking water.

We also look at the best way to avoid colliding with whales if you are navigating a cargo ship, and hear from Tim O’Higgins, a man who believes the value of the seas can’t just be measured by markets.

Getting out of the way of whales

International sea lanes and whales don’t mix, that’s why a group of researchers has worked out a way to keep the two apart, potentially saving scores of lives.

Mediterranean Sea: small changes big impacts

A Mediterranean cruise might not sound like a typical day in the life of a scientist, but for researchers studying the effects of human activity on the environment, the sea has become an extension of their laboratory.

Gut bacteria linked to longevity

A Mediterranean-style diet rich in fish, fruit and olive oil can help people live longer, and scientists believe this could be because of its effect on the bacteria in our stomachs.

Gut bacteria linked to longevity

A Mediterranean-style diet rich in fish, fruit and olive oil can help people live longer, and scientists believe this could be because of its effect on the bacteria in our stomachs.

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