Table of contents
Search in guide

Strategic Partnerships in the field of education, training and youth

What are the aims and priorities of a Strategic Partnership?

Strategic Partnerships aim to support the development, transfer and/or implementation of innovative practices as well as the implementation of joint initiatives promoting cooperation, peer learning and exchanges of experience at European level.

Depending on the objectives and the composition of the Strategic Partnership, projects may be of two types:

  • Strategic Partnerships supporting innovation:

Projects are expected to develop innovative outputs, and/or engage into intensive dissemination and exploitation activities of existing and newly produced products or innovative ideas. Applicants have the possibility to request a dedicated budget for Intellectual Outputs and Multiplier Events in order to directly answer to the innovation aspect of the Action. These types of projects are open to all fields of education, training and youth.

  • Strategic Partnerships supporting exchange of good practices:

The primary goal is to allow organisations to develop and reinforce networks, increase their capacity to operate at transnational level, share and confront ideas, practices and methods. Selected projects may also produce tangible outputs and are expected to disseminate the results of their activities, although in a way that is proportional to the aim and scope of the project. These results and activities will be co-financed through the standard budget for project management and implementation. Strategic Partnerships relevant to the field of higher education will not support these types of projects. In addition, some specific Strategic Partnership formats may be realised under this type of partnerships:

  • School Exchange Partnerships: Only schools may participate in this type of Strategic Partnerships. The projects can use mobility opportunities for pupils and staff to help the participating schools develop as organisations and increase their ability to work in international projects. In addition, combining mobility and physical exchanges with virtual cooperation through eTwinning is strongly encouraged.
  • Transnational Youth Initiatives: These Strategic Partnerships in the field of youth aim to foster social com-mitment and entrepreneurial spirit of young people. The distinctive feature of this format of Strategic Part-nerships is that a Youth Initiative is initiated, set up and carried out by young people themselves. 

More information about the characteristics of these specific project formats can be found under the section "Specific Strategic Partnerships Formats"

Irrespective from the field impacted by the project, Strategic Partnerships are open to any type of organisation active in any field of education, training and youth or other socio-economic sectors as well as to organisations carrying out activities that are transversal to different fields (e.g. local and regional authorities, recognition and validation centres, chambers of commerce, trade organisations, guidance centres, cultural organisations). Depending on the priority and the objectives addressed by the project, Strategic Partnerships should involve the most appropriate and diverse range of partners in order to benefit from their different experiences, profiles and specific expertise and to produce relevant and high quality project results.

To be funded, Strategic Partnerships must address either a) at least one horizontal priority or b) at least one specific priority relevant to the field of education, training and youth that is mostly impacted, as described below. Among these priorities, National Agencies may give more consideration to those that are particularly relevant in their national context ("European priorities in the national context"). National Agencies must duly inform potential applicants through their official websites.

Horizontal priorities

  • Supporting opportunities for all in acquiring and developing key competences, including basic skills: In order to foster employability, socio-educational and personal development, as well as participation in civic and social life. Priority will be given to projects that support and reinforce the development of key competences for all individuals from early childhood and throughout life. In a fast-changing world, this includes multilingual competences, entrepreneurial mind-set, critical thinking and creativity, cooperation in science, technology, engineering, arts and mathematics (STE(A)M) fields, as well as skills in fields such as climate action, artificial intelligence, but also social and learning-to-learn competences. This would include actions of cooperation with players in the research and innovation sector, civil society as well as in the private and public sector.
  • Social inclusion: Social inclusion is an overarching priority across all sectors of the programme. Promote – in particular through innovative and integrated approaches – ownership of shared values, equality, social inclusion, diversity and non-discrimination. Priority will be given to projects that support and assess new approaches to reducing disparities in accessing and engaging with formal and non-formal education, as well as projects that tackle discrimination, segregation and racism. The programme will support the integration of people with migrant backgrounds, including gathering and disseminating good practices on the issue. Priority will also be given to projects that encourage the establishment of sustainable links between organisations active in education, training, youth and sport and the society at large, including at local and regional level.
  • Common values, civic engagement and participation: The Programme will support active citizenship and ethics in lifelong learning; it will foster the development of social and intercultural competences, critical thinking and media literacy. Priority will also be given to projects that offer opportunities for people’s participation in democratic life, social and civic engagement through formal or non-formal learning activities. The focus will also be on raising awareness on and understanding the European Union context, notably as regards the common EU values, the principles of unity and diversity, as well as their social, cultural and historical heritage.
  • Environmental and climate goals: the programme aims to support, across all sectors, awareness-raising about environmental and climate-change challenges. Priority will be given to projects aimed at developing competences in various sustainability-relevant sectors, developing green sectorial skills strategies and methodologies, as well as future-oriented curricula that better meet the needs of individuals. The programme will also support the testing of innovative practices to prepare learners, staff and youth workers to become true factors of change (e.g. save resources, reduce energy use and waste, compensate carbon footprint emissions, opt for sustainable food and mobility choices, etc.). Priority will also be given to projects that – through education, training, youth and sport activities - enable behavioural changes for individual preferences, consumption habits, and lifestyles.
  • Innovative practices in a digital era: The Programme will support the taking up of digital technologies and of innovative and open pedagogies in education, training, youth and sport. Particular attention will be given to promoting gender equality and addressing differences in relation to the access and use by underrepresented groups. The Programme will also support the use of the European frameworks on digital competences of educators, citizens and organisations, including the development and use of open educational resources, open textbooks, and free and open source educational software. Priority will be given to actions that promote innovative methods and tools for teaching, training, learning and assessment as drivers of improvements in lifelong learning.
  • Supporting educators, youth workers, educational leaders and support staff: Priority will be given to actions that strengthen the recruitment and professional development of educators (e.g. teachers, trainers, professors, tutors, mentors, coaches, staff in early childhood education and care), youth workers, educational leaders (e.g. school heads, rectors, department heads) and support staff (e.g. teaching assistants, career counsellors, human resource specialists in companies). Particular attention will be given to actions that allow to better deal with inclusion and diversity, including cultural and linguistic, through the use of more diverse and more adapted teaching, training and youth work styles.
  • Transparency and recognition of skills and qualifications: Priority will be given to actions that support learning and labour mobility; actions that facilitate transitions between different levels and types of learning, transitions to the world of work as well as transitions between different jobs. The programme will support in particular better services and information or guidance for learners, exploring the potential of digital technologies to facilitate automatic mutual recognition and the validation - at local, regional, national, European or international level - of competences acquired through informal and non-formal learning. The programme will also support the effective launch and implementation of the new Europass framework and the access to tools and services for skills and qualifications.
  • Sustainable investment, quality and efficiency of education, training and youth systems: Priority will be given to actions that promote sustainable funding models, including exploring innovative approaches, to ensure adequate and sustainable investment in education, training and youth, including performance-based funding and cost-sharing, where appropriate.
  • Social and educational value of European cultural heritage, its contribution to job creation, economic growth and social cohesion: priority will be given to actions contributing to raising awareness of the importance of Europe's cultural heritage through education, lifelong learning, informal and non-formal learning, youth as well as sport, including actions to support skills development, social inclusion, critical thinking and youth engagement. New participatory and intercultural approaches to heritage, as well as educational initiatives aimed at fostering intercultural dialogue involving teachers and pupils from an early age will be promoted.

Field-specific priorities

In the field of higher education, priority will be given to actions that are key to achieving the objectives of the European Education Area, notably the new European Universities initiative and the European Student card. This means, inter alia, reinforcing internationalisation and mobility, strengthening links between education, research and innovation where relevant, as well as implementing the Council Recommendation on promoting automatic mutual recognition of qualifications. In line with the challenges identified in the renewed EU Agenda for higher education, initiatives to enhance the performance of Europe’s higher education systems will be supported, including the implementation of the Council Recommendation on tracking graduates and the Digital Education Action Plan. The Programme will also support the implementation of the Ministerial Communiqué of the Bologna Process.

  • Promoting internationalisation, The programme will aim to strengthen the strategic and structured cooperation between higher education institutions through: a) support for various types of cooperation models, including the most ambitious ones such as the European Universities; b) contributing to removing obstacles to mobility by implementing automatic mutual recognition of qualifications and learning outcomes, and by embedding mobility in curricula; c) support for higher education institutions to implement the Bologna principles and tools to enhance mobility for all and to develop a successful multilingual European Education Area by 2025.
  • Tackling skills gaps and mismatches through: a) supporting the development of learning-outcomes-oriented curricula that better meet the learning needs of students, while also being relevant for the labour market and for the wider society; b) implementing trans-disciplinary approaches and innovative pedagogies such as student-centred learning, inverted learning and research-based learning which support the acquisition of transferable forward-looking skills; c) developing, testing and implementing flexible and modular course design (part-time, online or blended) and appropriate forms of assessment; d) increasing attractiveness and reforming curricula for STEM with a STEAM approach including real-world applications, inquiry-based and ICT-enriched learning, collaborative practices, including university-business cooperation.
  • Rewarding excellence in learning, teaching and skills development, through a) developing and implementing strategies and quality culture to reward and incentivise excellence in teaching b) training of academics in new and innovative pedagogies, including trans-disciplinary approaches, new curriculum design, delivery and assessment methods linking education with research and innovation where relevant, c) fostering an entrepreneurial, open and innovative higher education sector, by promoting learning and teaching partnerships with commercial and non-commercial organisations in the private sector; e) developing of new practices based on educational research and creativity.
  • Building inclusive higher education systems The programme will foster inclusive approaches for the mobility and cooperation activities such as a) increased access, participation and completion rates of underrepresented and disadvantaged groups; b) development and implementation of flexible mobility formats (short, virtual and blended); c) active support to incoming mobile participants throughout the process of finding accommodation, including through collaboration with the relevant stakeholders for the provision of appropriate and affordable housing. Particular attention will be given to achieving appropriate gender balance.
  • Fostering civic engagement: promotion of civic and social responsibility of students, researchers and universities including through extra-curricular activities and recognition of voluntary and community work in academic results where appropriate.
  • Supporting the implementation of the European Student Card initiative through secure electronic transfer of students' data between higher education institutions, in full respect of personal data protection and linking where possible with the new Europass. The objective is to enable students to manage online the entire set of administrative steps of their mobility abroad (from selection up to their ECTS credits recognition), while at the same time facilitating an easier access to a wide range of student services - including libraries, catering and accommodation - when on a campus abroad. The main components of the European Student Card initiative are being developed through Erasmus+ projects funded under Key Action 2: Strategic partnerships and Key Action 3: Forward-looking projects.
  • Consolidation and further development of higher education data tools and data sources1 to monitor progress towards reaching the objectives of the European Education Area and the renewed EU agenda for higher education.
  • Fostering effective, efficient and sustainable system-level funding and governance models, rewarding excellent teaching, innovation and community-relevance.

In the field of school education, priority will be given to:

  • Reinforcing the development of key competences (in line with the Council Recommendation on key competences for lifelong learning) for example by promoting cross-curricular collaboration, creativity and innovative learning approaches and environments, cooperating with stakeholders in local communities and abroad, supporting teachers in delivering competence based teaching and developing assessment and validation of key competences.
  • Strengthening the profile of the teaching professions, including teachers, school leaders and teacher educators, for example by: making careers more attractive and diverse; strengthening selection, recruitment and evaluations (models of staff appraisal, assessment and feedback); enhancing teachers’ initial education and continuous professional development and linking its different phases; facilitating and significantly increasing teacher mobility, including by overcoming remaining obstacles; supporting teachers in developing innovative teaching and assessment methods, especially to promote competence-oriented teaching and learning; strengthening leadership in education, including distributed leadership and teacher leadership.
  • Promoting a comprehensive approach to language teaching and learning (in line with the Council Recommendation on language teaching and learning), building on the increasing linguistic diversity in schools, for example by: encouraging early language learning and awareness; developing bilingual teaching options, especially for border regions and/or in areas where inhabitants use more than one language; mainstreaming the use of new technologies to support language learning; supporting the integration of the language dimension across the curricula; focusing on reaching adequate competence levels by the end of compulsory education; promoting the creation of language aware schools2
  • Increasing the levels of achievement and interest in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). This priority will include, among others: promoting the development of national STEM strategies; developing partnerships between schools, businesses, higher education institutions, research institutions, and wider society; promoting effective and innovative pedagogies and assessment; promoting the STE(A)M approach to education through interdisciplinary teaching of STEM in cultural, environmental, economic, design and other contexts, with the involvement of all academic disciplines.
  • Tackling early school leaving and disadvantage, enabling success for all learners, including children with a migrant background, for example by: strengthening collaboration among all actors within schools, as well as with families, and other external stakeholders; improving transitions between different stages of education; fostering preventive and early intervention approaches; supporting networking of schools which promote collaborative and holistic approaches to teaching and learning; improving evaluation and quality assurance.
  • Developing high quality early childhood education and care systems (in line with the ECEC Council Recommendation), for example by: supporting initial and continuing professional development of all staff involved in organising, leading and providing early childhood education and care; creating, testing or implementing strategies and practices to foster participation of all children in early childhood education and care, including children in need of special support (e.g. children with disabilities, or children from disadvantaged socio-economic backgrounds, children from a migrant background); promoting the implementation of the EU quality framework for quality early childhood education and care.
  • Building capacity for promoting and facilitating recognition of learning periods abroad (including follow-up to the Council Recommendation on automatic mutual recognition) , including promoting recognition of formal education and transversal competences developed through non-formal and informal learning, for example by: building administrative capacity of schools to support participation of pupils in transnational projects and peer exchanges, including by exploring the potential of intermediary bodies pooling the capacity of several schools; establishing sustainable partnerships between organisations setting cross-border learning exchanges in general education; promoting embedded class exchanges or pupil mobility in school programmes; ensuring appropriate safety standards for pupils participating in transnational mobility; developing and disseminating tools and mechanisms for the preparation, monitoring and recognition of periods abroad; and sharing and promoting good practices.
  • Developing strong quality assurance systems to achieve high-quality inclusive education and enhance trust among countries in relation to the quality of their respective school education systems, for example by: supporting countries in developing synergies between internal and external evaluations, in engaging stakeholders in quality assurance processes, or in designing their quality assurance strategies in ways to support broad competence development.

In the field of vocational education and training (both initial and continuing), priority will be given to:

  • Developing partnerships supporting the setting up and implementation of internationalisation strategies for VET providers3, aimed at putting in place the necessary support mechanisms as well as contractual frameworks to promote quality mobility of VET staff and learners4, including promoting the automatic mutual recognition of qualifications and learning outcomes; developing student support services to foster VET internationalisation and learner mobility, through actions aimed at informing, motivating, preparing and facilitating the social integration of the VET learner in the host country, while enhancing their intercultural awareness and active citizenship.
  • Developing partnerships aimed at promoting work-based learning in all its forms, for both young and/or adults and in particular for the implementation of the Council Recommendation on a European Framework for Quality and Effective Apprenticeships5. These partnerships can also aim at developing new training content and joint VET qualifications that integrate periods of work-based learning, opportunities to apply knowledge in practical workplace situations, and embedding international mobility experience whenever possible.
  • Increasing the quality in VET through the establishment of feedback loops to adapt VET provision, including by setting-up or testing graduate tracking arrangements as part of quality assurance systems in line with the Council Recommendation on tracking graduates, and the Recommendation on the European Quality Assurance Reference Framework for Vocational Education and Training (EQAVET)6 ;
  • Enhancing access to training and qualifications for all, with a particular attention to the low-skilled, through continuing VET, notably by increasing quality, supply and accessibility of continuing VET, validation of non-formal and informal learning, promoting work-place learning, providing for efficient and integrated guidance services and flexible and permeable learning pathways; includes developing partnerships between micro, small and medium sized companies and VET providers aimed at promoting joint competences centres, learning networks, support to pooling of resources, and providing initial and/or continuing training to their staff.
  • Further strengthening key competences in initial and continuing VET, in particular literacy, numeracy, digital, entrepreneurship, as well as languages, including common methodologies for introducing those competences in curricula, as well as for acquiring, delivering and assessing the learning outcomes of those curricula.
  • Supporting the uptake of innovative approaches and digital technologies for teaching and learning, as outlined in the Digital Education Action Plan, including the effective use of the SELFIE self-reflection tool to support a comprehensive approach to innovation, and the use of digital technologies for pedagogical, administrative, technical and organisational change.
  • Introducing systematic approaches to, and opportunities for, the initial and continuous professional development of VET teachers, trainers and mentors in both school and work-based settings (including apprenticeships), as well as through the development of effective digital, open and innovative education and pedagogies, as well as practical tools; raising the attractiveness of the professions for VET teachers, trainers, mentors and leaders.
  • Developing sustainable partnerships to establish and/or further develop national, regional and sectoral skills competitions organisations, as a form of raising the attractiveness and excellence in VET. These partnerships could also develop and support the practical arrangements for the preparation, training and participation of VET learners and staff in international, national, regional and sectoral skills competitions, while working closely together with businesses, VET providers, chambers and other relevant stakeholders.

In the field of adult education, priority will be given to:

  • Improving and extending the supply of high quality learning opportunities for adults by making available flexible learning offers adapted to their learning needs (e.g. blended learning, digital learning applications), and by the validation of skills acquired through informal and non-formal learning
  • Supporting the setting up of and access to upskilling pathways for adults with a low level of skills, knowledge and competences allowing them to enhance their literacy, numeracy and digital competences, as well as other key competences, and to progress towards higher qualifications, including through skills identification and screening or tailored learning offers.
  • Increasing learning demand and take-up through effective outreach, guidance and motivation strategies which support the Upskilling Pathways by encouraging and supporting low-skilled and/or low-qualified adults or through developing guidance as a service to ensure that adults have access to relevant learning throughout life.
  • Extending and developing the competences of educators and other personnel who support adult learners, in particular in assessing their prior knowledge and skills and in motivating them to learn; improve teaching methods and tools through effective use of innovative solutions and digital technologies.
  • Developing mechanisms to monitor the effectiveness and improve quality assurance of adult learning policies and provision, and to track the progress of adult learners.
  • Promoting Erasmus+ among all citizens and generations, including by offering activities of education and exchanges of experiences to seniors, with view to building and adding solidity to the European identity.

In the field of youth, in line with the EU Youth Strategy, priority will be given to:

  • engaging, connecting and empowering young people: strengthening cross-sectorial cooperation, allowing for greater synergies across different areas of actions that matter for young people. A special focus will be put on participation –including alternative and innovative forms of participation –and active citizenship of young people, notably those that involve youth at risk of social exclusion.
    Priority will be given to projects that:
    • Enhance the participation of all young people in democratic and civic life in Europe;
    • Enable young people to connect with, express their views and be heard by elected policy-makers, public administrations, interest groups, civil society organisations or individuals active in political or social processes affecting their lives;
    • Enhance critical thinking and media literacy among young people to strengthen democracy and counter manipulation, propaganda and disinformation;
    • Broaden and deepen political, civic and social participation of young people at local, regional, national, European or global level;
    • Foster active citizenship and notably volunteering and solidarity among young people;
    • Increase social inclusion of all young people, building on European values;
    • Promote intercultural dialogue and promote knowledge about and acceptance of diversity and tolerance in society;
    • Strengthen young people's sense of initiative, notably in the social field and to support their communities;
    • Reinforce links between policy, research and practice and promote better knowledge about the situation of young people and youth policies.
  • contributing to quality and innovation in Youth Work and its recognition
    Priority will be given to projects that:
    • Support capacity-building of youth workers and youth work practices;
    • Support youth workers in developing and sharing effective methods in reaching out to marginalised young people, in preventing racism and intolerance among youth, and in addressing the risks, opportunities, and implications of digitalisation;
    • Foster the inclusion and employability of young people with fewer opportunities (including NEETs), with particular emphasis in young people at risk of marginalisation and those with a migrant background;
    • Open up youth work to cross-sectoral cooperation allowing greater synergies across all areas of actions that address the concerns of young people;
    • Ease transition of young people from youth to adulthood, including supporting the integration into the labour market by addressing key competences and other organisational support that youth work can bring;
    • Promote recognition and validation of youth work and informal and non-formal learning at European, national, regional and local levels.
  • promoting entrepreneurship and creative learning and social entrepreneurship among young people
    Priority will be given to projects in the form of transnational youth initiatives that allow groups of young people to put ideas into practice, including through social enterprises, tackling challenges and identified problems in their daily lives.

What are the activities supported in a Strategic Partnership?

Over the lifetime of a project, and depending on the type of Strategic Partnership, projects may typically realise a broad range of activities, for example:

  • activities that strengthen the cooperation and networking between organisations;
  • testing and/or implementation of innovative practices in the field of education, training and youth;
  • activities that facilitate the recognition and validation of knowledge, skills and competences acquired through formal, non‑formal and informal learning;
  • activities of cooperation between regional authorities to promote the development of education, training and youth systems and their integration in actions of local and regional development;
  • activities to support learners with disabilities/special needs to complete education cycles and facilitate their transition into the labour market, including by combating segregation and discrimination in education for marginalised communities;
  • activities to better prepare and deploy the education and training of professionals for equity, diversity and inclusion challenges in the learning environment;
  • activities to promote the integration of refugees, asylum seekers and newly arrived migrants and raise awareness about the refugee crisis in Europe;
  • transnational initiatives fostering entrepreneurial mind-sets and skills, to encourage active citizenship and entrepreneurship (including social entrepreneurship), jointly carried out by two or more groups of young people from different countries.

Strategic Partnerships may also organise transnational learning, teaching and training activities of individuals, in so far as they bring added value in the achievement of the project's objectives.  Some of these activities are particularly relevant in one or more fields of education, training and youth, as stated in the table below.  For a more detailed description of the supported activities, see Annex I.

Type of activity

Particularly relevant for

Blended mobility of learners

All fields of education, training and youth

Short-term exchanges of groups of pupils

School education, VET

Intensive Study Programmes

Higher education

Long-term study mobility of pupils

School education

Long-term teaching or training assignments

Higher education, VET, School and Adult education

Long-term mobility of youth workers

Youth

Short-term joint staff training events

All fields of education, training and youth

Who can take part in a Strategic Partnership?

As a general rule, Strategic Partnerships target the cooperation between organisations established in Programme Countries. However, organisations from Partner Countries can be involved in a Strategic Partnership, as partners (not as applicants), if their participation brings an essential added value to the project.

In addition to the organisations formally participating in the project and receiving EU funds, Strategic Partnerships may also involve associated partners from the public or private sector who contribute to the implementation of specific project tasks/activities or support the dissemination and sustainability of the project. For contractual management issues, associated partners are not considered as part of the project partners, and they do not receive funding. However, their involvement and role in the project and different activities have to be clearly described.

What are the criteria used to assess a Strategic Partnership?

Here below are listed the formal criteria that a Strategic Partnership must respect in order to be eligible for an Erasmus+ grant:

General Eligibility Criteria

Eligible participating organisations

A participating organisation can be any public or private organisation, established in a Programme Country or in any Partner Country of the world (see section "Eligible Countries" in Part A of this Guide).

For example, such organisation can be:

  • a higher education institution;
  • a school/institute/educational centre (at any level, from pre-school to upper secondary education, and including vocational education and adult education);
  • a non-profit organisation, association, NGO;
  • a public or private, a small, medium or large enterprise (including social enterprises);
  • a public body at local, regional or national level;
  • a social partner or other representative of working life, including chambers of commerce, industry, craft/professional associations and trade unions;
  • a research institute;
  • a foundation;
  • an inter-company training centre;
  • enterprises providing shared training (collaborative training);
  • a cultural organisation, library, museum;
  • a body providing career guidance, professional counselling and information services;
  • a body validating knowledge, skills and competences acquired through non-formal and informal learning;
  • a European Youth NGO;
  • a group of young people active in youth work but not necessarily in the context of a youth organisation (i.e. informal group of young people)7.

Higher education institutions (HEIs) established in a Programme Country must hold a valid Erasmus Charter for Higher Education (ECHE). An ECHE is not required for participating HEIs in Partner Countries, but they will have to sign up to its principles.

Who can apply?

Any participating organisation established in a Programme Country can be the applicant. This organisation applies on behalf of all participating organisations involved in the project.

Number and profile of participating organisations

A Strategic Partnership is transnational and involves minimum three organisations from three different Programme Countries. There is no maximum number of participating organisations. However, the budget for project management and implementation is capped (and equivalent to 10 participating organisations). All participating organisations must be identified at the time of applying for a grant.

Exceptionally, different rules apply for the following Strategic Partnerships:
  • Strategic Partnerships in the youth field must involve minimum two organisations from two different Programme Countries;
  • School Exchange Partnerships must involve a minimum of two and a maximum of six schools from at least two different Programme countries8.

Venue(s) of the activities

All the activities of a Strategic Partnership must take place in the countries of the organisations participating in the project. Learning, teaching and training activities for learners and long-term activities for staff can only be organised in Programme Countries

In addition, if duly justified in relation to the objectives or implementation of the project: 
  • Activities can also take place at the seat of an Institution of the European Union, even if in the project there are no participating organisations from the country that hosts the Institution9,
  • Multiplier events can be hosted in the country of any of the associated partners involved in the Strategic Partnership.

Duration of project

  • Partnerships in the field of higher education: between 24 and 36 months;
  • Partnerships in the field of VET, school education and adult education: between 12 and 36 months10;
  • Partnerships in the youth field: between 6 and 36 months.

The duration has to be chosen at application stage, based on the objective of the project and on the type of activities planned over time.

In exceptional cases, the duration of a Strategic Partnership may be extended, upon request by the beneficiary and with the agreement of the National Agency, of up to 6 months and provided that the total duration does not exceed 3 years. In such a case, the total grant will not change. In all cases, projects must end not later than 31 August 2023.

Where to apply?

To the National Agency of the country in which the applicant organisation is established11.

Per deadline, the same consortium of partners can submit only one application and to one National Agency only.

When to apply?

Partnerships in the fields of Higher Education, VET, School and Adult education:

applicants have to submit their grant application by 24 March at 12:00 (midday Brussels time) for projects starting between 1 September and 31 December of the same year.

Partnerships in the youth field:

applicants have to submit their grant application by:

  • 5 February at 12:00 (midday Brussels time) for projects starting between 1 June and 30 September of the same year;
  • 30 April at 12:00 (midday Brussels time) for projects starting between 1 September of the same year and 31 January of the following year;
  • 1 October at 12:00 (midday Brussels time) for projects starting between 1 February and 31 May of the following year.

For Strategic Partnerships in the youth field: for each of the three deadlines, National Agencies may open the deadline to both types of Strategic Partnerships (i.e. supporting innovation and supporting exchanges of good practices) or only to one type of projects. Applicants are invited to check the website of their National Agency for more precise information.

How to apply?

Please see Part C of this Guide for details on how to apply.

Aditional Eligibility Criteria

In addition, if the Strategic Partnership foresees any of the following transnational learning, teaching and training activities, the relevant additional eligibility criteria must be respected:

Short-term joint staff training events

ELIGIBLE Participants

Professors, teachers, trainers, educational and administrative staff12  working in participating organisations in Programme and Partner Countries. Youth workers from Programme and Partner Countries.

Duration of Activity 3 days to 2 months; excluding travel days
Intensive Study Programmes

Eligible Participants

  • ​Learners: Higher education students enrolled in a participating HEI in a Programme Country.
  • Teaching staff: teaching staff from participating HEIs in Programme or Partner Countries.
  • Invited teachers: teaching staff from non-participating HEIs, and experts/specialists/professionals from enterprises or other organisations in Programme or Partner Countries. 

Duration of Activity

  • Learners: 5 days to 2 months; excluding travel days 
  • Teaching staff (including invited teachers): 1 day to 2 months; excluding travel days
Blended mobility of pupils, learners and young people (short-term physical mobility combined with virtual mobility)

ELIGIBLE PARTICIPANTS

  • Apprentices, VET learners, higher education students13, adult learners, and pupils from participating organisations in Programme Countries. Young people from Programme Countries. 
DURATION OF ACTIVITY 5 days to 2 months; excluding travel days
Short-term exchanges of groups of pupils (including VET learners)​
ELIGIBLE PARTICIPANTS School pupils and VET learners of any age enrolled in a participating school (including VET organisations) in a Programme Country and accompanied by school staff.
DURATION OF ACTIVITY 3 days to 2 months; excluding travel days
Long-term teaching or training assignments
ELIGIBLE PARTICIPANTS Professors, teachers, trainers, educational and administrative staff working in the participating organisations in Programme Countries.
DURATION OF ACTIVITY 2 to 12 months
Long-term study mobility of pupils
ELIGIBLE PARTICIPANTS Pupils aged 14 or older, enrolled at a participating school in a Programme Country. 
DURATION OF ACTIVITY 2 to 12 months
Long-term mobility of youth workers
ELIGIBLE PARTICIPANTS Youth workers from Programme Countries.
DURATION OF ACTIVITY 2 to 12 months

Applicant organisations will be assessed against the relevant exclusion and selection criteria. For more information please consult Part C of this Guide.

Award criteria

Depending on the objectives of the project, the participating organisations involved, the expected impact, and other elements, Strategic Partnerships can be of different sizes, and adapt their activities accordingly. In simplified terms, this action enables participating organisations to gain experience in international cooperation and to strengthen their capacities, but also to produce high-quality innovative deliverables. The qualitative assessment of the project will be proportional to the objectives of the cooperation and the nature of the organisations involved.  

Projects will be assessed against the following criteria:

Relevance of the project

(maximum 30 points)

  • The relevance of the proposal to:
    • the objectives and the priorities of the Action (see section "What are the aims and priorities of a Strategic Partnership").
    • If the proposal addresses the horizontal priority "social inclusion", it will be considered as highly relevant.
    • If the proposal addresses one or more "European Priorities in the national context", as announced by the National Agency, it will be considered as highly relevant.
  • The extent to which:
    • the proposal is based on a genuine and adequate needs analysis;
    • the objectives are clearly defined, realistic and address issues relevant to the participating organisations and target groups;
    • the proposal is suitable of realising synergies between different fields of education, training and youth;
    • the proposal is innovative and/or complementary to other initiatives already carried out by the participating organisations;
    • the proposal brings added value at EU level through results that would not be attained by activities carried out in a single country.

Quality of the project design and implementation

(maximum 20 points)

  • The clarity, completeness and quality of the work programme, including appropriate phases for preparation, implementation, monitoring, evaluation and dissemination;
  • The consistency between project objectives and activities proposed;
  • The quality and feasibility of the methodology proposed;
  • The existence and relevance of quality control measures to ensure that the project implementation is of high quality, completed in time and on budget;
  • The extent to which the project is cost-effective and allocates appropriate resources to each activity.
  • If applicable, the use of Erasmus+ online platforms (i.e. eTwinning; EPALE; School Education Gateway) as tools for preparation, implementation and follow-up of the project activities.
  • For School Exchange Partnerships:
    • the extent to which the projects is building on previous or ongoing eTwinning projects;
    • the extent to which the project is using eTwinning in combination with physical mobility to create longer, more frequent and richer exchanges between pupils and teachers in different countries (blended mobility).

If the project plans training, teaching or learning activities:

  • The quality of practical arrangements, management and support modalities in  learning, teaching and training activities;
  • The extent to which these activities are appropriate to the project's aims and involve the appropriate number of participants;
  • The quality of arrangements for the recognition and validation of participants' learning outcomes, in line with European transparency and recognition tools and principles.

Quality of the project team and the cooperation arrangements

(maximum 20 points)

  • The extent to which:
    • the project involves an appropriate mix of complementary participating organisations with the necessary profile, experience and expertise to successfully deliver all aspects of the project;
    • the distribution of responsibilities and tasks demonstrates the commitment and active contribution of all participating organisations;
    • if relevant for the project type, the project involves participation of organisations from different fields of education, training, youth and other socio-economic sectors14;
    • The extent to which  the project involves newcomers to the Action.
  • For School Exchange Partnerships: the extent to which the project involves eTwinning schools and creates opportunities for them to promote best practices in eTwinning and provide mentorship to other schools who are less experienced in using eTwinning.
  • The existence of effective mechanisms for coordination and communication between the participating organisations, as well as with other relevant stakeholders;
  • If applicable, the extent to which the involvement of a participating organisation from a Partner Country brings an essential added value to the project (if this condition is not fulfilled, the project will not be considered for selection).

Impact and dissemination (maximum 30 points)

  • The quality of measures for evaluating the outcomes of the project
  • The potential impact of the project:
    • on participants and participating organisations, during and after the project lifetime;
    • outside the organisations and individuals directly participating in the project, at local, regional, national and/or European levels.
  • The quality of the dissemination plan: the appropriateness and quality of measures aimed at sharing the outcomes of the project within and outside the participating organisations;
  • If relevant, the extent to which the proposal describes how the materials, documents and media produced will be made freely available and promoted through open licences, and does not contain disproportionate limitations;
  • The quality of the plans for ensuring the sustainability of the project: its capacity to continue having an impact and producing results after the EU grant has been used up.

To be considered for funding, proposals must score at least 60 points. Furthermore, they must score at least half of the maximum points in each of the categories of award criteria mentioned above (i.e. minimum 15 points for the categories "relevance of the project" and "impact and dissemination"; 10 points for the categories "quality of the project design and implementation" and "quality of the project team and the cooperation arrangements"). Proposals that do not address at least one priority of the Action will not be funded.

Specific Strategic Partnership formats

Strategic Partnerships support a wide and flexible range of activities in order to implement high-quality projects, promote development and modernisation of organisations, and support policy developments at European, national and regional level.

Depending on the objectives of the project, the participating organisations involved, the expected impact, and other elements, Strategic Partnerships can be of different sizes, and adapt their activities accordingly.

Among the great variety of activities and project formats, the following Strategic Partnerships have specific characteristics.

School Exchange Partnerships

The main goal of School Exchange Partnerships is to strengthen the European dimension in the participating schools, to build up their capacity for cross-border cooperation and their ability to cope with new challenges. By organising mobility activities for pupils, these partnerships will also promote the common values of freedom, inclusion, tolerance and non-discrimination as underlined in the Paris Declaration of March 2015.

School Exchange Partnerships can implement different activities for exchange of staff and pupils:

  • Short-term exchanges of groups of pupils (3 days to 2 months): pupils from different countries can work together in activities linked to the aims of the partnership. The short-term exchange activities are designed to offer international learning experiences to pupils, to develop their understanding of the diversity of European cultures and languages, and to help them acquire social, civic and intercultural competences necessary for their personal development. 
  • Long-term study mobility of pupils (2 to 12 months): pupils aged at least 14 may spend a period in a receiving school and a host family abroad. The sending and hosting schools are expected to ensure high quality learning outcomes, to provide appropriate recognition for the involved pupils, and to constantly support them during their mobility period. Applicants for School Exchange Partnerships may focus entirely on organisation of long-term pupil mobility as a tool to develop the international cooperation potential of the involved schools.
  • Short-term joint staff training events (3 days to 2 months): teaching and non-teaching staff can work together to exchange experience and know-how, or receive joint training.
  • Long-term teaching or training assignments (2 to 12 months): through a longer posting in a partner school, this activity allows staff to develop their knowledge and understanding of other countries' education and training systems, and helps them share and acquire professional competences, methods and practices.

ETWINNING in school exchange partnerships

Combining mobility and physical exchanges with virtual cooperation can be an important element of School Exchange Partnerships. In particular, projects are strongly encouraged to use eTwinning to work together before, during and after the project activities.

To demonstrate the strengths of their proposal in terms of use of eTwinning, the applicants should explain the relevant elements in their project application. Particularly important elements include:

  • Involving schools with eTwinning school label15 in the project and creating opportunities for them to promote best practices in eTwinning and to provide mentorship to other schools who are less experienced in using eTwinning;
  • Presenting concrete plans to build on previous or ongoing eTwinning projects;
  • Using eTwinning in combination with physical mobility to create longer, more frequent and richer exchanges between pupils and teachers in different countries (blended mobility).

Specific eligibility criteria applying to school exchange partnerships

Compared to other Strategic Partnerships, the following specific rules will apply to this format:

  • Partnerships must involve a minimum of two and a maximum of six schools16;
  • Only schools from Programme Countries can participate;
  • As a general rule, projects will last between 12 and 24 months. Only projects organising long-term mobility of pupils may last up to 36 months, if justified by their workplan;
  • Funds are provided for mobility activities of staff and pupils (including accompanying teachers or other qualified persons), as well as general project management and implementation costs. Dedicated funding is not provided for Intellectual Outputs, Multiplier Events and Transnational Project Meetings. Additional funds for support to participants with special needs, as well as Exceptional costs may be requested, if justified. For details, please consult the section "What are the funding rules?", below;
  • Funding will be limited to a maximum of 16 500 EUR per year and per participating school. This cap will apply at project level17. Funds for support to participants with special needs, as well as Exceptional costs for expensive travel will not count towards this cap.

Successful School Exchange Partnerships use a specific contracting model compared to other Strategic Partnerships. At application stage, the applicant school takes the lead of the project and applies on behalf of all the participating schools. However, once the partnership is selected, each participating school will sign a separate grant agreement with the National Agency established in its country. The applicant school remains in a coordinating role for the duration of the project and will be responsible for reporting on the project's overall results, while the partner schools report only on their specific expenses.

Transnational Youth Initiatives18

These Strategic Partnerships in the field of youth aim to foster social commitment and entrepreneurial spirit of young people. For example, these initiatives may concern:

  • the establishment of (networks of) social enterprises, associations, clubs, NGOs,
  • the development and delivery of courses and trainings on entrepreneurship education (notably social entrepreneurship and use of ICTs;
  • information, media literacy, sensitization actions, or actions stimulating civic commitment among young people (e.g. debates, conferences, events, consultations, initiatives around European topics, etc.);
  • actions for the benefit of the local communities (e.g. support to vulnerable groups such as elderly people, minorities, migrants, disabled, etc.);
  • artistic and cultural initiatives (theatre plays, exhibitions, music performances, discussion fora, etc.).

The distinctive feature of this format of Strategic Partnerships is that a Youth Initiative is initiated, set up and carried out by young people themselves.

What else should you know about this action?

Supporting regional cooperation in school education

Strategic Partnerships in the field of school education have an opportunity to apply for projects based around cross-border cooperation between regions or municipalities from different countries. The distinctive aspect of these partnerships is the strategic involvement of local and/or regional school authorities. To create a successful application, the local or regional authorities should take a lead role in the planning of activities addressing a shared issue through involvement of organisations from the civil and private sectors together with schools in their community.

Exceptional costs for expensive travel
Applicants for Strategic Partnerships organising learning, teaching and training activities will be allowed to claim financial support under the budget heading "exceptional costs" (up to a maximum of 80% of total eligible costs: see "What are the funding rules?"), including cases where the participants opt for cleaner, lower carbon emission means of transport (e.g. train), which result in expensive travel costs. This will be allowed provided that applicants can justify that the standard funding rules (based on unit costs per travel distance band) do not cover at least 70% of the travel costs of participants. If awarded, the exceptional costs for expensive travel replace the standard travel grant.

Other information

In addition to the information provided above, more compulsory criteria and additional useful information, as well as project examples relating to this Action can be found in the Annex I of this Guide. Interested organisations are invited to read carefully the relevant sections of this Annex before applying for financial support.

What are the funding rules?

Strategic Partnerships will range from fairly simple cooperation projects between small scale organisations (like schools or informal groups of young people) to rather sophisticated and large-scale projects focusing on the development and exchange of innovative outputs in all fields of education, training and youth. The expenses incurred by the different types of projects will necessarily vary accordingly.

By consequence, the proposed funding model consists of a menu of cost items from which applicants will choose according to the activities they want to undertake and the results they want to achieve. The first item, "project management and implementation" is a cost item that all types of Strategic Partnerships may apply for, as they are meant to contribute to costs that any project will incur. With the exception of School Exchange Partnerships, Strategic Partnerships may also apply for specific funding to organise "transnational project meetings". The other cost items can only be chosen by projects that will pursue more substantial objectives in terms of intellectual outputs/products, dissemination or embedded teaching, training and learning activities. Additionally, if justified by the project activities/outputs, exceptional costs and costs for participation of persons with special needs can be covered. 

The total project grant is a variable amount, defined by multiplying 12 500 EUR by the duration of the project (in months), and capped at 450 000 EUR for projects with duration of 36 months. Exceptionally, for School Exchange Partnerships a ceiling of 16 500 EUR per year and per participating school will apply at project level. Funds for support to participants with special needs, as well as Exceptional costs covering high travel costs will not count towards the funding cap for School Exchange Partnerships.

The budget of the project must be drafted according to the following funding rules (in euro):

Maximum grant awarded:

a variable amount, defined by multiplying 12 500 EUR by the duration of the project (in months) and up to 450 000 EUR for projects with duration of 36 months

(Exception: for School Exchange Partnerships: a maximum of 16 500 EUR per year and per participating school, applied at project level, and excluding Special Needs Support and Exceptional costs for expensive travel)

Some of the maxima amounts indicated in the tables above are capped per month and are calculated following a pro-rata approach, so that the grant awarded divided by the number of months results in a maximum of 12 500 EUR. However, the beneficiaries can use-up the total EU grant received for the project in the most flexible way, throughout its duration and according to the way the activities need to be implemented chronologically in the work plan.

Eligible costs

Financing mechanism

Amount

Rule of allocation

Project management and implementation

Project management (e.g. planning, finances, coordination and communication between partners, etc.); small scale learning/teaching/training materials, tools, approaches etc. Virtual cooperation and local project activities (e.g. class-room project work with learners, youth work activities, organisation and mentoring of embedded learning/training activities, etc.); information, promotion and dissemination (e.g. brochures, leaflets, web information, etc.). 

Costs linked to the implementation of Transnational Youth Initiatives and School Exchange Partnerships.

Contribution to unit costs

Contribution to the activities of the coordinating organisation:

500 EUR per month

Maximum 2750 EUR per month

Based on the duration of the Strategic Partnership and on the number of participating organisations involved

Contribution to unit costs

Contribution to the activities of the other participating organisations:

250 EUR per organisation per month

Transnational project meetings

Participation in meetings between project partners and hosted by one of the participating organisations for implementation and coordination purposes. Contribution to travel and subsistence costs.

This budget item is not available for School Exchange Partnerships.

Contribution to unit costs

For travel distances between 100 and 1999KM:

575 EUR per participant per meeting

For travel distances of 2000 KM or more:

760 EUR per participant per meeting

Conditional: applicants must justify the need for the meetings in terms of number of meetings and participants involved. Travel distances must be calculated using the distance calculator supported by the European Commission.

Exceptional costs

Contribution to real costs related to subcontracting or purchase of goods and services.

Costs for providing a financial guarantee, if the National Agency asks for it.

Real costs

75% of eligible costs

Maximum of 50.000 EUR per project (excluding costs for providing a financial guarantee)

Conditional: subcontracting has to be related to services that cannot be provided directly by the participating organisations for duly justified reasons. Equipment cannot concern normal office equipment or equipment normally used by the participating organisations.

Special needs support

Additional costs directly related to participants with disabilities19

Real costs

100% of eligible costs

Conditional: the request for these costs must be motivated in the application form.

Additional funding for Strategic Partnerships supporting innovation in the field of education, training and youth

Intellectual outputs

Intellectual outputs/tangible deliverables of the project (such as curricula, pedagogical and youth work materials, open educational resources (OER), IT tools, analyses, studies, peer-learning methods, etc.)

Contribution to unit costs

B1.1 per manager per day of work on the project

Conditional: staff costs for managers and administrative staff are expected to be covered already under "Project management and implementation". To prevent potential overlap with such item, applicants will have to justify the type and volume of staff costs applied for in relation to each output proposed.

The outputs should be substantial in quality and quantity to qualify for this type of grant support. The outputs should prove their potential for wider use and exploitation, as well as for impact.

B1.2 per researcher/ teacher /trainer/youth worker per day of work on the project

B1.3 per technician per day of work on the project

B1.4 per administrative staff per day of work on the project

Multiplier events

Contribution to the costs linked to national and transnational conferences, seminars, events sharing and disseminating the intellectual outputs realised by the project (excluding costs for travel and subsistence of representatives of participating organisations involved in the project).

Contribution to unit costs

100 EUR per local participant

(i.e. participants from the country where the event is taking place)

Maximum 30 000 EUR per project

Conditional: support for multiplier events is provided only if in direct relation to the intellectual outputs of the project. A project without grant support for intellectual outputs cannot receive support for organising multiplier events.

200 EUR per international participant (i.e. participants from other countries)

Funding rules for transnational learning, teaching and training activities carried out within the Strategic Partnership (optional funding)

Eligible costs

Financing mechanism

Amount

Rule of allocation

Travel

Contribution to the travel costs of participants, including accompanying persons, from their place of origin to the venue of the activity and return

Contribution to unit costs

For travel distances between 10 and 99KM:

20 EUR per participant

Conditional: applicants will have to justify that mobility activities are necessary to achieve the objectives and results of the project.

Travel distances must be calculated using the distance calculator supported by the European Commission20. The applicant must indicate the distance of a one-way travel to calculate the amount of the EU grant that will support the round trip21  

For travel distances between 100 and 499 KM:

180 EUR per participant

For travel distances between 500 and 1999 KM:

275 EUR per participant

For travel distances between 2000 and 2999 KM:

360 EUR per participant

For travel distances between 3000 and 3999 KM:

530 EUR per participant

For travel distances between 4000 and 7999 KM:

820 EUR per participant

For travel distances of 8000 KM or more:

1500 EUR per participant

Individual support

Unit cost per day covering the subsistence of participants, including accompanying persons, during the activity

Contribution to unit costs

Long term teaching or training assignments

Long term mobility of youth workers

up to the 14th day of activity: B1.5 per day per participant

+

between the 15 th and 60 th day of activity: B1.6 per day per participant

+

between the 61th day of activity and up to 12 months: B1.7 per day per participant

Short term joint staff training events,

Teaching or providing expertise in Intensive Study Programmes

accompanying persons in all activities22

up to the 14th day of activity: 106 EUR per day per participant

+

between the 15 th and 60 th day of activity: 74 EUR per day per participant

Long term mobility of pupils

B1.8 per month per participant

Short term activities for learners

(blended mobility, short term pupils' mobility, intensive study programmes):

up to the 14th day of activity: 58 EUR per day per participant

+

between the 15 th and 60 th day of activity: 42 EUR per day per participant

Linguistic support

Costs linked to the support offered to participants in order to improve the knowledge of the language of instruction or work 

Contribution to unit costs

Only for activities lasting between 2 and 12 months:

150 EUR per participant needing linguistic support

Conditional: the request for financial support must be motivated in the application form.

Exceptional Costs

Expensive travel costs of participants, including the use of cleaner, lower carbon emission means of transport (for details, see section "what else you should know about this action").

Real Costs

Expensive travel costs: maximum up to 80% of eligible costs

Conditional: the request for financial support to cover exceptional costs must be motivated in the application form

Table A – Intellectual outputs (amounts in euro per day)

This funding can only be used for staff costs of organisations participating in the project for the production of Intellectual outputs23. The amounts depend on: a) profile of staff involved in the project and b) the country of the participating organisation whose staff is involved.

Manager

Teacher/Trainer/Researcher/

Youth worker

Technician

Administrative staff

B1.1

B1.2

B1.3

B1.4

Denmark, Ireland, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Austria, Sweden, Liechtenstein, Norway

294

241

190

157

Belgium, Germany, France, Italy, Finland, United Kingdom, Iceland

280

214

162

131

Czech Republic, Greece, Spain, Cyprus, Malta, Portugal, Slovenia

164

137

102

78

Bulgaria, Estonia, Croatia, Latvia, Lithuania, Hungary, Poland, Romania, Serbia, Slovakia, North Macedonia, Turkey

88

74

55

39

Table B – Intellectual outputs (amounts in euro per day)

This funding can only be used for staff costs of organisations participating in the project for the production of Intellectual outputs24. The amounts depend on: a) profile of staff involved in the project and b) the country of the participating organisation whose staff is involved.

Manager

Teacher/Trainer/Researcher/

Youth worker

Technician

Administrative staff

B1.1

B1.2

B1.3

B1.4

Australia, Canada, Kuwait, Macao, Monaco, Qatar, San Marino, Switzerland, United States of America

294

241

190

157

Andorra, Brunei, Japan, New Zealand, Singapore, United Arab Emirates, Vatican City State

280

214

162

131

Bahamas, Bahrain, Hong Kong, Israel, Korea (Republic of), Oman, Saudi Arabia, Taiwan

164

137

102

78

Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Congo – Democratic Republic of the, Cook Islands, Costa Rica, Cuba, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Fiji, Gabon, Gambia, Georgia, Ghana, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Republic of Côte d'Ivoire, Jamaica, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kiribati, Korea (DPR), Kosovo, Kyrgyzstan, Laos, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Marshall Islands, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Micronesia – Federated States of, Moldova, Mongolia, Montenegro, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nauru, Nepal, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Niue, Pakistan, Palau, Palestine, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines,  Rwanda, Saint Kitts And Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent And The Grenadines, Samoa, Sao Tome and Principe, Senegal, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, South Sudan, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Eswatini, Syria, Tajikistan, Tanzania, Territory of Russia as recognised by international law, Territory of Ukraine as recognised by international law, Thailand, Timor Lest – Democratic Republic of Togo, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uganda, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Vietnam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe

88

74

55

39

Table C - Subsistence of participants in transnational learning, teaching and training activities (in euro per day/month)

Scales of contribution to unit costs change according to: a) type of mobility and b) the country where the activity takes place:

Long-term teaching or training assignments - mobility of youth workers

(in euro per day)

Long-term activities of pupils

(in euro per month)

B1.5

B1.6

B1.7

B1.8

Group 1

Norway, Denmark, Luxembourg, United Kingdom, Iceland, Sweden, Ireland, Finland, Liechtenstein

125

88

63

168

Group 2

Netherlands, Austria, Belgium, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Cyprus, Greece, Malta, Portugal

110

77

55

147

Group 3

Slovenia, Estonia, Latvia, Croatia, Slovakia, Czech Republic, Lithuania, Turkey, Hungary, Poland, Romania, Bulgaria, North Macedonia, Serbia

90

63

45

105

  • 1. For example: U-Multirank; ETER; Graduate tracking; HEInnovate.
  • 2. In line with the Council Recommendation on a comprehensive approach to the teaching and learning of languages
  • 3. Guidance document "Go international: Practical Guide on Strategic Internationalisation in VET", http://ec.europa.eu/programmes/erasmus-plus/sites/erasmusplus2/files/eac....
  • 4. The specific rules and information relating to VET learner mobility activities, as described in Annex I of the Programme guide, should be applied.
  • 5. Council Recommendation on a European Framework for Quality and Effective Apprenticeships (2018/C 153/01)
  • 6. OJ C 155, 8.7.2009, p. 1–10
  • 7. In case of an informal group, one of the members of the group assumes the role of representative and takes responsibility on behalf of the group.
  • 8. Depending on the country where the school is registered, a specific definition of eligible schools applies for this type of partnerships. The definition and/or a list of eligible schools is published on the website of each National Agency. In addition, please note that the contracting model for School Exchange Partnerships differs from other Strategic Partnerships and is based on monobeneficiary Grant Agreements. For further details, please refer to Part C of this Guide or contact your National Agency.
  • 9. Seats of the Institutions of the European Union are Brussels, Frankfurt, Luxembourg, Strasbourg, and The Hague.
  • 10. For the specific format "School Exchange Partnerships" additional criteria apply. Please see section "School Exchange Partnerships".
  • 11. Please note: schools under the supervision of national authorities of another country (e.g. Lycée français, German schools, UK "Forces" schools) apply to the NA of the supervising country.
  • 12. In the school education field, this includes educational staff intervening in schools, such as school inspectors, school counsellors, pedagogical advisors, psychologists, etc.
  • 13. Higher education students must be registered in a participating HEI and enrolled in studies leading to a recognised degree or other recognised tertiary level qualification, up to and including the level of doctorate.
  • 14. These criteria are not relevant for School Exchange Partnerships.
  • 15. You can find out more about the eTwinning school label at: https://www.etwinning.net/en/pub/highlights/the-etwinning-school-label---.htm
  • 16. Depending on the country where the school is registered, a specific definition of eligible schools applies for this type of partnerships. The definition and/or a list of eligible schools is published on the website of each National Agency. For further details, please refer to Part C of this Guide or contact your National Agency.
  • 17. For example, three schools running a partnership for two years may receive a maximum of 99 000 EUR for the whole project. These funds can be divided in any way between the three schools.
  • 18. Project promoters applying for Transnational Youth Initiatives should apply under Strategic Partnerships supporting exchanges of good practices.
  • 19. Including costs directly related to participants with special needs and accompanying persons taking part in transnational learning, teaching and training activities. This may include costs related to travel and subsistence, if justified and as long as a grant for these participants is not requested through budget categories "travel" and "individual support").
  • 20. http://ec.europa.eu/programmes/erasmus-plus/resources/distance-calculator_en
  • 21. For example, if a person from Madrid (Spain) is taking part in an activity taking place in Rome (Italy), the applicant will a) calculate the distance from Madrid to Rome (1365,28 KM); b) select the applicable travel distance band ( i.e. between 500 and 1999 KM) and c) calculate the EU grant that will provide a contribution to the costs of travel of the participant from Madrid to Rome and return (275 EUR).
  • 22. Accompanying persons are entitled to receive the same rate, independently from the short or long term activities they take part in. In exceptional cases, where the accompanying person needs to stay abroad for more than 60 days, extra subsistence costs beyond the 60th day will be supported under the budget heading "Special needs support".
  • 23. In the case of HE, costs for staff employed by faculties of ECHE accredited beneficiary universities are eligible under the cost category 'intellectual outputs
  • 24. In the case of HE, costs for staff employed by faculties of ECHE accredited beneficiary universities are eligible under the cost category 'intellectual outputs