Part A: General information about the Erasmus+ Programme

Erasmus+ is the EU Programme in the fields of education, training, youth and sport for the period 2021-2027. Education, training, youth and sport are key areas that support citizens in their personal and professional development. High quality, inclusive education and training, as well as informal and non-formal learning, ultimately equip young people and participants of all ages with the qualifications and skills needed for their meaningful participation in democratic society, intercultural understanding and successful transition in the labour market. Building on the success of the programme in the period 2014-2020, Erasmus+ strengthens its efforts to increase the opportunities offered to more participants and to a wider range of organisations, focusing on its qualitative impact and contributing to more inclusive and cohesive, greener and digitally fit societies.

European citizens need to be better equipped with the knowledge, skills and competences needed in a dynamically changing society that is increasingly mobile, multicultural and digital. Spending time in another country to study, to learn and to work should become the standard, while speaking two other languages in addition to ones’ mother tongue should be the norm. The Programme is a key component supporting the objectives of the European Education Area, the Digital Education Action Plan 2021-2027, the European Youth Strategy and the European Union Workplan for Sport.

As the COVID-19 pandemic has shown, access to education is proving, more than ever, to be essential to ensuring a swift recovery, while promoting equal opportunities for all. As part of this recovery process, the Erasmus+ programme takes its inclusive dimension to a new horizon by supporting opportunities for personal, socio-educational and professional development of people in Europe and beyond, with the aim of leaving no-one behind.

To increase the qualitative impact of its actions and ensure equal opportunities, the Programme will reach out more and better to people of different ages and from diverse cultural, social and economic backgrounds. It is at the heart of the Programme to come closer to those with fewer opportunities, including people with disabilities and migrants, as well as European Union citizens living in remote areas or facing socio-economic difficulties. In doing so, the Programme will also encourage its participants, in particular young people to engage and learn to participate in civic society, raising awareness about European Union common values.

Furthermore, developing digital skills and competences and skills in forward-looking fields, such as combating climate change, clean energy, artificial intelligence, robotics, big data analysis, etc. is essential for Europe's future sustainable growth and cohesion. The Programme can make a meaningful contribution by stimulating innovation and bridging Europe's knowledge, skills and competences gap. EU businesses need to become more competitive through talent and innovation. This investment in knowledge, skills and competences will benefit individuals, institutions, organisations and society as a whole by contributing to sustainable growth and ensuring equity, prosperity and social inclusion in Europe and beyond.

Another challenge relates to the Europe-wide trends of limited participation in democratic life and low levels of knowledge and awareness about European matters and their impact on the lives of all European citizens. Many people are reluctant, or face difficulties, in actively engaging and participating in their communities or in the European Union's political and social life. Strengthening European identity and the participation of young people in democratic processes is of paramount importance for the European Union's future. This issue can also be targeted through non-formal learning activities, which aim at enhancing the skills and competences of young people as well as their active citizenship.

In line with the European Union’s priorities in making sustainable its economy, projects should be designed in an eco-friendly manner and should incorporate green practices in all facets. Organisations and participants involved should have an environmental-friendly approach when designing their projects, which will encourage them to discuss and learn about environmental issues, make them think about what can be done at their level and help them come up with alternative greener ways of implementing their activities.

Supporting and facilitating the transnational and international cooperation between organisations in the fields of education, training, youth and sport is essential to empowering people with more key competences, reducing early school leaving and recognising competences acquired through formal, informal and non-formal learning. It facilitates the circulation of ideas and the transmission of best practices and expertise and the development of digital capabilities thus contributing to a high quality education while strengthening social cohesion. The Erasmus+ Programme is one of the European Union’s most visible success stories. It builds on the achievements of more than 30 years of European programmes in the fields of education, training, youth and sport, covering both an intra-European as well as an international partnerships dimension.

The Erasmus+ Programme Guide is drafted in accordance with the Erasmus+ annual Work Programme adopted by the European Commission, and therefore may be revised to reflect the priorities and lines of action defined in the Work Programmes adopted in the following years. The implementation of this Guide is also subject to the availability of the appropriations provided for in the draft budget after the adoption of the budget for the year by the EU Budgetary Authority or as provided for in the system of provisional twelfths.

What are the objectives and important features of the Erasmus+ Programme?

General objective

The general objective of the Programme is to support, through lifelong learning, the educational, professional and personal development of people in education, training, youth and sport, in Europe and beyond, thereby contributing to sustainable growth, quality jobs and social cohesion, to driving innovation, and to strengthening European identity and active citizenship. As such, the Programme shall be a key instrument for building a European Education Area, supporting the implementation of the European strategic cooperation in the field of education and training, with its underlying sectoral agendas, advancing youth policy cooperation under the Union Youth Strategy 2019-2027 and developing the European dimension in sport.

Specific objectives

The Programme has the following specific objectives:

  • promote learning mobility of individuals and groups, as well as cooperation, quality, inclusion and equity, excellence, creativity and innovation at the level of organisations and policies in the field of education and training;

  • promote non-formal and informal learning mobility and active participation among young people, as well as cooperation, quality, inclusion, creativity and innovation at the level of organisations and policies in the field of youth;

  • promote learning mobility of sport staff, as well as cooperation, quality, inclusion, creativity and innovation at the level of sport organisations and sport policies.

Important characteristics of the Erasmus+ Programme

The following features of the Programme deserve special attention:

Protection, health and safety of participants

Protection and safety of participants involved in the Erasmus+ projects are important principles of the Programme. All persons participating in the Erasmus+ Programme should have the opportunity to take full advantage of the possibilities for personal and professional development and learning. This should be assured in a safe environment which respects and protects the rights of all persons, their physical and emotional integrity, their mental health and wellbeing.

Each organisation participating in the Programme must have in place effective procedures and arrangements to promote and guarantee the safety, protection and non-discrimination of the participants in their activity. When necessary, adults should accompany underage participants (pupils, VET learners, youngsters) in mobility activities. Accompanying adults should ensure sufficient quality of the learning component of the mobility as well as the protection and safety of the underage participants.

In addition, all pupils, students, trainees, apprentices, adult learners, young people, and staff, involved in a mobility activity under all Key Actions of the Erasmus+ Programme, must be insured against the risks linked to their participation in these activities. The Programme leaves it up to project organisers to seek the most suitable insurance policy according to the type of project carried out and to the insurance formats available at national level. Furthermore, it is not necessary to subscribe to a project-specific insurance, if the participants are already covered by existing insurance policies of the project organisers.

In either case, the following areas must be covered:

  • wherever relevant, travel insurance (including damage or loss of luggage);
  • third party liability (including, wherever appropriate, professional indemnity or insurance for responsibility);
  • accident and serious illness (including permanent or temporary incapacity);
  • death (including repatriation in case of projects carried out abroad).

If applicable, it is strongly recommended that participants in transnational activities are in possession of a European Health Insurance Card. This is a free card that gives access to medically necessary, state-provided healthcare during a temporary stay in any of the 27 EU countries, Iceland, Liechtenstein and Norway, under the same conditions and at the same cost (free in some countries) as people insured in that country. More information on the card and on how to obtain it is available at http://ec.europa.eu/social/main.jsp?catId=559.

Finally, if projects involve young people under 18, participating organisations are required to obtain the prior authorisation of participation from their parents or those acting on their behalf.

Multilingualism

Multilingualism is one of the cornerstones of the European project and a powerful symbol of the EU's aspiration to be united in diversity. Foreign languages have a prominent role among the skills that will help equip people better for the labour market and make the most of available opportunities. The EU has set the goal that every citizen should have the opportunity to acquire at least two foreign languages, from an early age.

The promotion of language learning and linguistic diversity is one of the specific objectives of the Programme. The lack of language competences is one of the main barriers to participation in European education, training and youth programmes. The opportunities put in place to offer linguistic support are aimed to make mobility more efficient and effective, to improve learning performance and therefore contribute to the specific objective of the Programme.

The programme will offer language learning support to participants carrying out a mobility activity. This support will mainly be offered via the Erasmus+ Online Language Support (OLS) platform, adapted as necessary to individual sectors, as e-learning offers advantages for language learning in terms of access and flexibility. The Erasmus+ Online Language Support (OLS) will allow participants to assess, practice and improve their knowledge of languages. The platform will provide features such as assisted and blended learning tools to enable teachers and youth workers to provide extra support to their learners and social networking to enable collaborative learning. The Erasmus+ Online Language Support (OLS) will also provide free open language learning material. In addition to OLS, other forms for linguistic support may be offered to support the language learning needs of particular target groups – such as the use of sign language or braille, which can be financed through the dedicated financial inclusion support category.

Within the framework of cooperation projects, language teaching and learning will also be encouraged. Innovation and good practices aiming to promote language skills can include for example teaching and assessment methods, development of pedagogical material, research, computer assisted language learning and entrepreneurial ventures using foreign languages.

The European Commission has established the European Language Label (ELL) awards to recognise quality, to support the sharing of results of excellent projects in the area of multilingualism, and to promote public interest in language learning. National Agencies will award the ELL annually or biennially to education and training organisations that have completed a decentralised Erasmus+ project with outstanding results in the area of language learning and teaching. In addition to the selection among Erasmus+ projects, the National Agency may decide to award the ELL to other initiatives with comprehensive, inclusive or innovative approaches to the teaching and learning of languages.

International dimension

Erasmus+ includes a strong international dimension (i.e. cooperation with Partner Countries) in mobility, cooperation and policy dialogue activities. In order to support European organisations in facing the global challenges brought about by globalisation, climate change and the digital transition, a key element is the intensification of international mobility and cooperation with third countries, strengthening the role of the European Union as a global actor. In parallel, the Programme actions contribute to promoting values, principles and interests around common priorities, , notably related to human and institutional development climate change, digital transition, growth and jobs, good governance and peace and security. The engagement of the young people in Partner Countries is a key element in the process of building societies that are more resilient and are based on mutual trust and intercultural understanding.

Recognition and validation of skills and qualifications

Erasmus+ supports EU transparency and recognition tools for competences, skills and qualifications – in particular Europass, Youthpass, the European Qualifications Framework (EQF), the European Credit Transfer and Accumulation System (ECTS), the European Quality Assurance Reference Framework (EQAVET), the European Quality Assurance Register (EQAR), the European Association for Quality Assurance in Higher Education (ENQA) – as well as EU-wide networks in the field of education and training supporting these tools, in particular the National Academic Recognition Information Centre (NARIC), Euroguidance networks, the National Europass Centres and the EQF National Coordination Points. A common purpose of these tools is to ensure that competences, skills and qualifications can be more easily recognised and are better understood, within and across national borders, in all sub-systems of education and training as well as in the labour market, no matter whether these were acquired through formal education and training or through other learning experiences (e.g. work experience; volunteering, online learning).

In order to fulfil these objectives, the tools available should be able to cater for new phenomena such as internationalisation of education and growing use of digital learning, and support the creation of flexible learning pathways in line with learners' needs and objectives. The tools may also need to evolve in the future, leading to enhanced coherence and simplification that allow learners and workers to move freely for learning or working.

In the field of youth, thematic strategies1 such as Youthpass and the European Training Strategy (ETS) aim at offering further support to the developments in these areas.

More information available at: https://ec.europa.eu/education/policy/strategic-framework/skills-qualifi...

Communicating projects and their results to maximise impact

Communicating projects and their results is crucial to ensure impact at different levels. Depending on the action, applicants for funding under Erasmus+ are required to plan their communication activities to share information about their project and results during and beyond the project life cycle. Project applications will be evaluated based on relevant criteria to ensure that these aspects are covered. Applicants will also need to evaluate the success of their communication activities, both qualitatively and quantitatively. The level and intensity of communication and dissemination activities should be proportional to the objectives, the scope and the targets of the different actions of Erasmus+.

Beneficiaries must clearly acknowledge the European Union’s support in all communication and dissemination activities and products, such as events, internet websites and publications. In particular, they must ensure that the European Union emblem is included in all communication material and it respects the provisions laid out in the grant agreement or grant decision2. The beneficiary’s grant may be reduced if such provisions are not respected.

In order to design a good communication and dissemination plan, applicants need to take into consideration the following:

  • The communication objectives: i.e. to raise awareness, promote societal values, develop new partnerships for the future or influence policies and practices;

  • The audience or target group: these are the people you would like to reach out to and that could make use of results.  Be as specific as you can. It can be the general public, stakeholders, experts and other interested parties, decision-makers, media etc.;

  • The channels and activities to reach the target audience: applicants need to choose the channels and activities that are the most effective and appropriate to meet the needs of their chosen targets, such as social media, events, publications.

  • The project results (outputs and outcomes) such as good practice guide, a practical tool or product, research report of studies, what knowledge and skills were gained and so on. Results should be shared or promoted on the Erasmus+ Project Result Platform (https://ec.europa.eu/programmes/erasmus-plus/projects_en).

  • The timing: you need to effectively plan when different activities take place (linking it to work plan/ milestones), agree on realistic target and ensure flexibility depending on the project progress, the change in needs of the target audience or group as well as development in policy and procedure.

  • Key performance indicators (KPIs): indicators are a valuable management tool to monitor progress (and allow adjustments if needed) during the implementation of the communication and dissemination plan and to measure the degree of success in achieving its objectives

Erasmus+ Open Access Requirement for educational materials

Erasmus+ promotes the open access of project outputs to support learning, teaching, training, and youth work. In particular, Erasmus+ beneficiaries are committed to make any educational resources and tools which are produced in the context of projects supported by the Programme – documents, media, software or other materials freely available for the public under an open license. The materials should be easily accessible and retrievable without cost or limitations, and the open license must allow the public to use, reuse, adapt and share the resource. Such materials are known as ‘Open Educational Resources’ (OER). To achieve this aim, the resources should be uploaded in an editable digital form, on a suitable and openly accessible platform. While Erasmus+ encourages beneficiaries to apply the most open licenses3,  beneficiaries may choose licenses that impose some limitations, e.g. restrict commercial use by others, or commit others to apply the same license on derivative works, if this is appropriate to the nature of the project and to the type of material, and if it still allows the public to use, reuse, adapt and share the resource. The open access requirement is obligatory and is without prejudice to the intellectual property rights of the grant beneficiaries.

Erasmus+ Open Access for research and data

Erasmus+ encourages beneficiaries to publish research output through open access pathways, i.e. in ways which are free of cost or other access restrictions. Beneficiaries are also encouraged to apply open licenses to this research output. Whenever possible, data collected by projects should be published as 'open data', i.e. with an open license, in a suitable format and on a suitable open data platform.

Priorities of the Erasmus+ Programme

Inclusion and Diversity

The Programme seeks to promote equal opportunities and access, inclusion, diversity and fairness across all its actions. Organisations and the participants with fewer opportunities themselves are at the heart of these objectives and with these in mind, the programme puts mechanisms and resources at their disposal. When designing their projects and activities, organisations should have an inclusive approach, making them accessible to a diverse range of participants.

To achieve this, National Agencies are also vital to support projects with a view for these to being as inclusive and diverse as possible. Based on the overall principles and mechanisms at European level, National Agencies will draw up inclusion and diversity plans to best address the needs of participants with fewer opportunities and to support the organisations working with these target groups in their national context. At the same time, the SALTO Resource Centres supporting the implementation of the programme are also key players in promoting and rolling out inclusion and diversity measures, in particular as regards to gather knowledge and to conceive and run capacity-building activities for National Agency staff and programme beneficiaries. Likewise, the European Education and Culture Executive Agency (EACEA) plays an equally important role for the programme strands that are managed centrally. In Partner Countries, EU Delegations and – where they exist - the National Erasmus+ Offices (NEOs) are also key in bringing the programme closer to the target groups addressed by this Strategy.

In order to implement these principles, an Inclusion and Diversity Strategy covering all programme fields is devised to support an easier access to funding for a wider range of organisations, and to better reach out to more participants with fewer opportunities. It also sets up a framework for those projects, supported through the programme, which intend to work on inclusion and diversity related issues. This Strategy aims to help addressing the barriers different target groups may face in accessing such opportunities within Europe and beyond.

The list of such potential barriers, spelt out below, is not exhaustive and is meant to provide a reference in taking action with a view to increasing accessibility and outreach to people with fewer opportunities. These barriers can hinder their participation both as a stand-alone factor and in combination among them:

  • Disabilities: This includes physical, mental, intellectual or sensory impairments which, in interaction with various barriers, may hinder someone’s full and effective participation in society on the same footing as others1.
  • Health problems: Barriers may result from health issues including severe illnesses, chronic diseases, or any  other physical or mental health-related situation that prevents from participating in the programme.
  • Barriers linked to education and training systems: Individuals struggling to perform in education and training systems for various reasons, early school-leavers, NEETs (people not in education, employment or training) and low-skilled adults may face barriers. Although other factors may play a role, these educational difficulties, while they may also be linked to personal circumstances, mostly result from an educational system which creates structural limitations and/or does not fully take into account the individual’s particular needs. Individuals can also face barriers to participation when the structure of curricula makes it difficult to undertake a learning or training mobility abroad as part of their studies.
  • Cultural differences: While cultural differences may be perceived as barriers by people from any backgrounds, they can particularly affect people with fewer opportunities. Such differences may represent significant barriers to learning in general, all the more for people with a migrant or refugee background – especially newly-arrived migrants -, people belonging to a national or ethnic minority, sign language users, people with linguistic adaptation and cultural inclusion difficulties, etc. Being exposed to foreign languages and cultural differences when taking part in any kind of programme activities may put off individuals and somehow limit the benefits from their participation. And such cultural differences may even prevent potential participants from applying for support through the programme, thereby representing an entry barrier altogether.
  • Social barriers: Social adjustment difficulties such as limited social competences, anti-social or high-risk behaviours, (former) offenders, (former) drug or alcohol abusers, or social marginalisation may represent a barrier. Other social barriers can stem from family circumstances, for instance being the first in the family to access higher education or being a parent (especially a single parent), a caregiver, a breadwinner or an orphan, or having lived or currently living in institutional care.
  • Economic barriers: Economic disadvantage like a low standard of living, low income, learners who need to work to support themselves, dependence on the social welfare system, in long-term unemployment, precarious situations or poverty, being homeless, in debt or with financial problems, etc., may represent a barrier. Other difficulties may derive from the limited transferability of services (in particular support to people with fewer opportunities) that needs to be "mobile" together with the participants when going to a far place or, all the more, abroad.  
  • Barriers linked to discrimination: Barriers can occur as a result of discriminations linked to gender, age, ethnicity, religion, beliefs, sexual orientation, disability, or intersectional factors (a combination of two or several of the mentioned discrimination barriers).
  • Geographical barriers: Living in remote or rural areas, on small islands or in peripheral/outermost regions, in urban suburbs, in less serviced areas (limited public transport, poor facilities) or less developed areas in third countries, etc., may constitute a barrier.

Digital Transformation

The COVID-19 crisis shed light on the importance of digital education for the digital transformation that Europe needs. In particular, it emphasised the increased need to harness the potential of digital technologies for teaching and learning and to develop digital skills for all. In line with the strategic priorities of the Digital Education Action Plan (2021-2027)2, the Programme aims to support this endeavour to engage learners, educators, youth workers, young people and organisations in the path to digital transformation.

The programme will support the first strategic priority of the Action Plan, the development of a high-performing digital education ecosystem, by building capacity and critical understanding in all type of education and training institutions on how to exploit the opportunities offered by digital technologies for teaching and learning at all levels and for all sectors and to develop digital transformation plans.

The programme will also support the second strategic priority of the Action Plan, by supporting actions aiming at enhancing digital skills and competence development at all levels of society and for everyone (including young people with fewer opportunities, students, job seekers and workers). The focus will be on fostering both basic and advanced digital skills as well as digital literacy, which has become essential for everyday life and for enabling people to navigate a world full of algorithms and participate fully in civil society and democracy.

In line with these two strategic priorities of the Action Plan, a European Digital Education Hub will be established to improve coordination on digital education at the EU level and to contribute to research exchange of good practice and research experimentation. The aim of the Hub will be to support Member States through closer cross-sectoral cooperation; a network of national advisory services on digital education to exchange experience and good practice on the enabling factors of digital education; linking national and regional digital education initiatives and strategies; and connecting national authorities, the private sector, experts, education and training providers and civil society through a more agile development of policy and practice in digital education. Moreover, the Hub will help monitor the implementation of the Digital Education Action Plan.

The Programme should reach out to a larger target group both within and beyond the Union by a greater use of information, communication and technology tools, combined use of physical mobility and virtual learning and virtual cooperation.

Participation in democratic life

The Programme addresses the Europe-wide trends of limited participation in democratic life and the low levels of knowledge and awareness about European matters that have an impact on the lives of all European citizens. Many people are reluctant, or face difficulties, in actively engaging and participating in their communities or in the Union's political and social life. Strengthening European identity and the participation of young people in democratic processes is of paramount importance for the Union's future.

The Programme supports active citizenship and ethics in lifelong learning; it fosters the development of social and intercultural competences, critical thinking and media literacy. Priority is given to projects that offer opportunities for people’s participation in democratic life, social and civic engagement through formal or non-formal learning activities. The focus is put on raising awareness of and understanding the European Union context, notably as regards the common EU values, the principles of unity and diversity, as well as their social, cultural and historical heritage.

Environment and fight against climate change

Environment and climate action are key priorities for the EU now and in the future. The European Green Deal Communication 3 is the European new growth strategy and recognises the key role of schools, training institutions and universities to engage with pupils, parents, and the wider community on the changes needed for a successful transition to become climate neutral by 2050.

The Programme will therefore be a key instrument for the building of knowledge, skills and attitudes on climate change and sustainable development both within the European Union and beyond. The Erasmus+ programme will increase the number of mobility opportunities in green forward-looking fields, which foster the development of competences, enhance career prospects and engage participants in subject areas, which are strategic for the sustainable growth of our planet, with special attention to rural development (sustainable farming, management of natural resources, soil protection, bio-agriculture). Moreover, Erasmus+, with mobility at its core, should strive for carbon-neutrality by promoting sustainable transport modes and more responsible behavior.

Since environment and fight against global warming will become a horizontal priority for the selection of projects, priority will be given to projects aimed at developing competences in various environmental sustainability-relevant sectors, including those in the framework of the contribution from education and culture to sustainable development goals, developing green sectorial skills strategies and methodologies, future-oriented curricula that better meet the needs of individuals, as well as initiatives that support the planned approaches of the participating organisations regarding environmental sustainability.

The Programme supports the use of innovative practices to make learners, staff and youth workers true factors of change (e.g. save resources, reduce energy use and waste, compensate carbon footprint emissions, opt for sustainable food and mobility choices, etc.). Priority will also be given to projects that – through education, training, youth and sport activities - enable behavioural changes for individual preferences, cultural values and awareness for sustainable development, consumption habits, and lifestyles.

Therefore, organisations and participants involved should strive to incorporate green practices in all projects through an environmental-friendly approach when designing the activity, which will encourage them to discuss and learn about environmental issues, to reflect about local actions and to come up with alternative greener ways of implementing their activities.

Platforms such as eTwinning and EPALE will continue to produce support materials and facilitate the exchange of effective educational practices and policies on environmental and sustainability matters. Erasmus+ is also a powerful instrument to reach out to and engage with a wide spectrum of players in our society (schools, universities, VET providers, youth and sport organisations, NGOs, local and regional authorities, civil society organisations, etc.).

Participation in democratic life

The Programme addresses the citizens’ limited participation in its democratic processes and their lack of knowledge about the European Union, and tries to help them overcome the difficulties in actively engaging and participating in their communities or in the Union's political and social life. Strengthening citizens’ understanding of the European Union from an early age is crucial for the Union’s future. In addition to formal education, non-formal learning can enhance the citizens’ understanding of the European Union and foster a sense of belonging to it.

The Programme supports active citizenship and ethics in lifelong learning; it fosters the development of social and intercultural competences, critical thinking and media literacy. Priority is given to projects that offer opportunities for people’s participation in democratic life, social and civic engagement through formal or non-formal learning activities. The focus is put on raising awareness of and understanding the European Union context, notably as regards the common EU values, the principles of unity and diversity, as well as their social, cultural and historical heritage.

In the field of youth, a Youth Participation Strategyhttps://www.salto-youth.net/rc/participation/ypstrategy/ has been designed to provide a common framework and support the use of the Programme to foster youth participation in democratic life.

What is the structure of the Erasmus+ Programme?

In order to achieve its objectives, the Erasmus+ Programme foresees the implementation of the following Actions in the 2021-2027 period:

Key Action 1 - Mobility of Individuals

This Key Action supports:

  • Mobility of learners and staff: opportunities for pupils, students, trainees and young people, as well as for professors, teachers, trainers, youth workers, sport coaches, staff of education institutions and civil society organisations to undertake a learning and/or professional experience in another country;
  • Youth Participation Activities: youth-led local and transnational initiatives run by informal groups of young people and/or youth organisations to help young people engage and learn to participate in democratic life, raising awareness about European Union common values and fundamental rights, bringing together young people and decision makers at local, national and European level, as well as contributing to European Union common goals;
  • DiscoverEU Activities: action offering 18-years-old young people the opportunity to have a first-time, short-term individual or group experience traveling throughout Europe in the frame of an informal educational activity aimed at fostering their sense of belonging to the European Union and discovering its cultural diversity.
  • The programme offers language learning opportunities to participants carrying out a mobility activity abroad. This support will mainly be offered via the Erasmus+ Online Language Support (OLS) tool, adapted as necessary to individual sectors, as e-learning offers advantages for language learning in terms of access and flexibility. In particular cases, that is, when online learning is not the best tool to reach the target group, additional forms of language support will be offered.

Key Action 2 – Cooperation among organisations and institutions

This Key Action supports:

Partnerships for Cooperation, including:

  • Cooperation Partnerships: The primary goal of Cooperation Partnerships is to allow organisations to increase the quality and relevance of their activities, to develop and reinforce their networks of partners, to increase their capacity to operate jointly at transnational level, boosting internationalisation of their activities, and through exchanging or developing new practices and methods as well as sharing and confronting ideas.
  • Small-scale Partnerships: this action aims at widening access to the programme to small-scale actors and individuals who are hard to reach in the fields of school education, adult education, vocational education and training, youth and sport. With lower grant amounts awarded to organisations, shorter duration and simpler administrative requirements compared to the Cooperation Partnerships, this action aims at reaching out to grassroots organisations and newcomers to the Programme and less experienced organisations, reducing entry barriers to the programme for organisations with smaller organisational capacity.

Partnerships for Excellence, including:

  • European Universities: This action supports the emergence of bottom-up networks of higher education institutions, which will bring cross-border cooperation to the next level of ambition, through the development of joint long-term strategies for top-quality education, research and innovation, based on a common vision and shared values;
  • Centres for Vocational Excellence: This initiative supports the development of transnational platforms of centres of vocational excellence closely integrated in local and regional strategies for growth, innovation and competitiveness, while supporting overall structural changes and economic policies in the European Union;
  • Erasmus+ Teachers Academies: The overall objective of this action is to create European partnerships of teacher education and training providers to set up Erasmus+ Teacher Academies that will develop a European and international outlook in teacher education. These Academies will embrace multilingualism and cultural diversity, develop teacher education in line with the EU’s priorities in education policy and contribute to the objectives of the European Education Area.
  • Erasmus Mundus Action: This action aims at fostering excellence and world-wide internationalisation of higher education institutions via study programmes – at master course level – jointly delivered and jointly recognised by higher education institutions established in Europe, and open to institutions in other countries of the world.

Partnerships for Innovation, including:

  • Alliances for Innovation: This action aims at fostering strategic cooperation between key players in higher education and vocational education and training, business and research – the "knowledge triangle" – to foster innovation and modernisation of education and training systems in identifying and supplying the right set of skills, knowledge and competences to match the future labour market demand in sectors and fields that are strategic for Europe's sustainable growth and competitiveness;
  • Forward-looking projects: This action will aim to foster innovation, creativity and e-participation, as well as social entrepreneurship in different fields of education, training, youth and sport. It will support forward-looking ideas based around key European priorities, and that have the potential of becoming mainstreamed and giving input for improving education and training, youth and sport systems, as well as to bring a substantial innovative effect in terms of methods and practices to all types of learning and active participation settings for Europe's social cohesion.

Capacity Building projects in the field of youth: this action supports cooperation and exchange in the field of youth between Programme and Partner Country organisations and covers non-formal learning activities, with a focus on raising the capacity of organisations working with young people outside formal learning, while ensuring the active participation of young people.

Not-for-profit sport events: This action will support the preparation, organisation and follow up of not-for-profit sport events, organised either in one single country or in several countries by not-for-profit organisations or public bodies active in the field of sport. These events will aim at increasing the visibility of the Erasmus+ sport actions as well as raise awareness on the role of sport in promoting social inclusion, equal opportunities and health-enhancing physical activities.

Online platforms such as eTwinning, the Electronic Platform for Adult Learning in Europe (EPALE), the School Education Gateway (SEG) and the European Youth Portal will offer virtual collaboration spaces, partner-finding databases, communities of practice and other online services for teachers, trainers, youth workers, policy makers and other practitioners, as well as for pupils, young people and adult learners in Europe and beyond.

Key action 3 – Support to policy development and cooperation

This Key Action supports:

The European Youth Together action, targeting youth organisations at grass root level which want to establish partnerships across borders, i.e. which aim at adding a European dimension to their activities. The purpose is to encourage new applications from organisations that are not already well established at European level.

  • Actions aimed at preparing and supporting the implementation of the EU policy agenda on education, training, youth and sport, including sectoral agendas for higher education, vocational education and training, schools and adult learning, and in particular by facilitating the governance and functioning of the Open Methods of Coordination.
  • Carrying out European policy experimentations, led by high-level public authorities and involving field trials on policy measures in several countries, based on sound evaluation methods. In line with the EU Youth Strategy, a financial support will also be provided to the structures animating the National Working Group designated by each national authority in the frame of the EU Youth Dialogue at national level.

  • Actions aimed at gathering evidence and knowledge about education, training, youth and sport systems and policies at national and European level, with a view to facilitate reasoned policy-making. Evidence gathering and analysis will be undertaken through EU-wide or international surveys and studies as well as thematic and country-specific expertise.

  • Actions which facilitate transparency and recognition of skills and qualifications, as well as the transfer of credits, to foster quality assurance, support validation of non-formal and informal learning, skills management and guidance. This area will also include the support to national and European-level bodies or networks that facilitate cross-European exchanges as well as the development of flexible learning pathways between different fields of education, training and youth and across formal, non-formal and informal learning settings.

Actions that foster policy dialogue with stakeholders within and outside the European Union, through, for example, conferences, events and other activities involving policy makers, practitioners and other stakeholders in the fields of education, training, youth and sport, to raise awareness about the relevant European policy agendas and to promote Europe as an excellent study and research destination

  • Cooperation with international organisations with highly recognised expertise and analytical capacity (such as the OECD and the Council of Europe), to strengthen the impact and added value of policies in the fields of education, training, youth and sport;

Jean Monnet Actions

The Jean Monnet Actions will support:

  • Jean Monnet Action in the field of Higher Education: This action supports Higher Education Institutions inside and outside Europe to promote teaching and research on European integration and promote policy debate and exchanges involving the academic world and policy-makers on Union policy priorities. The following sub-actions are supported: Jean Monnet Modules: short teaching programmes in one or more disciplines of European Union studies; Jean Monnet Chairs: longer teaching posts with a specialisation in European Union studies for individual university professors, Jean Monnet Centres of Excellence: focal points gathering knowledge of high-level experts in various disciplines of European studies, as well as developing transnational activities and structural links with academic institutions in other countries;

  • Jean Monnet Action in other fields of education and training: This action promotes knowledge on the European Union in schools and vocational education and training (VET) institutes in the Programme Countries. It aims to offer opportunities to education providers to develop and deliver content to learners, to teacher training providers to support teachers with methodologies and updated knowledge on European Union issues and to promote debate and exchanges between school and VET representatives and stakeholders on learning about European Union subjects. The following sub-actions are supported: Teacher Training: design and offer structured training proposals on EU subjects to teachers; Networks: exchange of good practices and experiencing co-teaching within a group of countries.

  • Support to designated institutions: The action supports institutions pursuing an aim of European interest, providing to the Union, its Member States and its citizens with high quality services in specific priority subject areas. The main activities and outreach of these institutions involve research, including collection of data and their analysis to prepare future policies, teaching in situ and online for future staff of the international organisations and for civil servants in particular in juridical and management areas, organising events on priority issues for the Union and disseminating specific results and general information for the broad public.

What is the budget?

The Programme has an overall indicative financial envelope of  more than 26 billion EUR1 of the EU Budget for the seven years (2021-2027). The annual budget is adopted by the Budgetary Authority. The different steps for the adoption of the EU budget can be followed at: http://ec.europa.eu/budget/explained/management/deciding/deciding_detail....

For information about the available budget by action, please consult the 2021 Erasmus+ Annual Work Programme: (https://ec.europa.eu/programmes/erasmus-plus/resources/documents/annual-...).

  • 1. Indicatively, the financial envelope of the programme is set at €24.574 billion in current prices and an additional top-up of €1.7 billion in 2018 prices

Who implements the Erasmus+ Programme?

The European Commission

The European Commission is ultimately responsible for the running of the Erasmus+ Programme. It manages the budget and sets priorities, targets and criteria for the Programme on an on-going basis. Furthermore, it guides and monitors the general implementation, follow-up and evaluation of the Programme at European level. The European Commission also bears the overall responsibility for the supervision and coordination of the structures in charge of implementing the Programme at national level.  

At European level, the European Commission's European Education and Culture Executive Agency (EACEA) is responsible for the implementation of a number of actions of the Erasmus+ Programme. In addition to the information contained in this Guide, the relevant Call documents and application forms for the actions covered by this Guide and managed by the Executive Agency are published in the Funding and Tender Opportunity Portal: https://ec.europa.eu/info/funding-tenders/opportunities/portal/screen/home.

The Executive Agency is in charge of the complete life-cycle management of these projects, from the promotion of the Programme, the analysis of the grant requests, the monitoring of projects on the spot, up to the dissemination of the project and Programme results. It is also responsible for launching specific calls for proposals relating to some actions of the Programme that are not covered by this guide.

The European Commission, notably through the Executive Agency, is also responsible for:

  • carrying out studies in the fields supported by the Programme;
  • carrying out research and evidence-based activities through the Eurydice network;
  • improving the visibility and the systemic impact of the Programme through dissemination and exploitation activities of the Programme’s results;
  • ensuring the contractual management and financing of bodies and networks supported by the Erasmus Programme;
  • managing calls for tenders to provide services within the framework of the Programme.  

The National Agencies

The implementation of the Erasmus+ Programme is mainly implemented as Indirect Management, meaning that the European Commission entrusts budget implementation tasks to National Agencies; the rationale of this approach is to bring Erasmus+ as close as possible to its beneficiaries and to adapt to the diversity of national education, training and youth systems. For this purpose, each Programme Country has appointed one or more National Agencies (for the contact details, please consult the following link: http://ec.europa.eu/programmes/erasmus-plus/contact_en). These National Agencies promote and implement the Programme at national level and act as the link between the European Commission and participating organisations at local, regional and national level. It is their task to:

  • provide appropriate information on the Erasmus+ Programme;
  • administer a fair and transparent selection process for project applications to be funded in their country;
  • monitor and evaluate the implementation of the Programme in their country;
  • provide support to project applicants and participating organisations throughout the project life-cycle;
  • collaborate effectively with the network of all National Agencies and the European Commission;
  • ensure the visibility of the Programme;
  • promote the dissemination and exploitation of the results of the Programme at local and national level.

In addition, National Agencies play an important role as intermediate structures for the qualitative development and implementation of the Erasmus+ Programme by:  

  • carrying out projects and activities, such as Training and Cooperation Activities and Networking Activities  – outside the tasks of project life-cycle management – that support the qualitative implementation of the Programme and/or trigger policy developments in the fields supported by the Programme;
  • providing a supportive approach to newcomers, less experienced organisations and target groups with fewer opportunities, in order to remove the obstacles to full participation in the Programme;
  • seeking cooperation with external bodies and National Authorities in order to increase the impact of the Programme their respective fields of action, in their country and in the European Union.

The supportive approach of National Agencies aims at guiding the users of the Programme through all phases, from the first contact with the Programme through the application process to the realisation of the project and the final evaluation. This principle is not in contradiction with the fairness and the transparency of selection procedures. Rather, it is based on the idea that in order to guarantee equal opportunities for everybody, it is necessary to give more assistance to some Programme target groups through advising, counselling, monitoring, and coaching systems tailored to their needs.

The relevant calls covering the actions managed by the Erasmus+ National Agencies are published in the Erasmus+ Website1 and publicised in the websites of the National Agencies.

What other bodies are involved in the implementation of the Programme?

Apart from the bodies mentioned above, the following Resource Centres and information offices, platforms, and knowledge and expert networks provide complementary expertise to the implementation of the Erasmus+ Programme:

Resource centres and information offices

SALTO Resource Centres

The aim of the SALTO Resource Centres is to improve the quality and impact of the Erasmus+ programme at a systemic level through providing expertise, resources, information and training activities in specific areas for National Agencies and other actors involved in education, training and youth work. Among others, these activities include organising training courses, seminars workshops, study visits, forums, cooperation and partnership-building activities on Erasmus+ priority themes.

Education and training

In addition, in the fields of education and training, the work of the SALTO centre:

  • offers a platform for European training activities;
  • enables stakeholders to, inter alia, develop their organizations' capacities to fully seize Erasmus+ opportunities, share best practices across European countries, find partners, or increase their projects' impact at European level;

Youth

In the field of youth, the work of the SALTO centres also involves:

  • fostering the recognition of non-formal and informal learning;
  • developing and documenting training and youth work methods and tools;
  • giving an overview of European training activities that are available to youth workers through the European Training Calendar;
  • issuing practical publications and guidance;
  • providing up-to-date information about European youth work;
  • providing a database of trainers and resource persons in the field of youth work and training;  
  • coordinating the implementation of Youthpass, the instrument to support validation of non-formal and informal learning outcomes in youth mobility and youth work activities.

The SALTO centres in the youth field have either a thematic (participation and information, inclusion and diversity, training and cooperation) or geographical (Eastern Partnership Countries and Russia, Southern Mediterranean, Western Balkans) focus.

More information available at: www.salto-et.net and www.salto-youth.net

Otlas – the partner finding tool for organisations in the youth field

One of the tools developed and hosted by the SALTO-Youth Resource Centres is Otlas, a central online partner finding tool for organisations in the youth field. Organisations can register their contact details and areas of interest in Otlas, and also create partner requests for project ideas.

More information available at: www.salto-youth.net/otlas or www.otlas.eu

National Erasmus+ Offices

In the Partner Countries concerned (Western Balkans, Eastern and Southern Mediterranean countries, Russia and Central Asia) the National Erasmus+ Offices (NEOs) assist the Commission, the Executive Agency and the local authorities in the implementation of the Erasmus+ Programme. They are the focal point in these countries for their stakeholders involved in the Erasmus+ Programme in the area of higher education. They contribute to improving awareness, visibility, relevance, effectiveness and impact of the international dimension of Erasmus+.

The National Erasmus+ Offices are responsible for:

  • providing information about Erasmus+ activities that are open to the participation of their countries (including in the fields of higher education, youth and VET, where relevant);
  • advising and assisting potential applicants;
  • coordinating the local team of Higher Education Reform Experts (HEREs);
  • contributing to studies and events;
  • providing support to policy dialogue;
  • maintaining contacts with the local authorities and EU delegations;
  • following policy developments in the field of higher education in their country.

National Academic Recognition Information Centres (NARIC)

The NARIC network provides information concerning the recognition of diplomas and periods of study undertaken in other European countries as well as advice on foreign academic diplomas in the country where the NARIC is established. The NARIC network provides authoritative advice to anyone travelling abroad for the purposes of work or further education, but also to institutions, students, advisers, parents, teachers and prospective employers.

The European Commission supports the activities of the NARIC network through the exchange of information and experience between countries, the identification of good practices, the comparative analysis of systems and policies in this field, and the discussion and analysis of matters of common educational policy interest.

More information available at: www.enic-naric.net

Eurodesk network

The Eurodesk network offers information services to young people and those who work with them on European opportunities in the education, training and youth fields, and the involvement of young people in European activities.

Present in all Programme Countries, and coordinated at European level by the Eurodesk Brussels-link Office, the Eurodesk network offers enquiry answering services, funding information, events and publications. It also contributes to the animation of the European Youth Portal.

The European Youth Portal offers European and national information and opportunities that are of interest to young people who are living, learning and working in Europe. It provides information in 28 languages.

To access the European Youth Portal, go to: http://europa.eu/youth/. For more information on Eurodesk, go to: http://www.eurodesk.eu.

Europass National Centres

Europass aims to help individuals to present and document their skills and qualifications in a clear and transparent way throughout Europe. Communication between job-seekers and employers, as well as mobility for working or learning purposes, are facilitated by this initiative.

In every country (European Union and European Economic Area plus the Republic of North Macedonia, Serbia and Turkey), a National Europass Centre coordinates all activities related to the Europass documents. It is the first point of contact for any person or organisation interested in using or learning more about Europass.

More information available at: http://europass.cedefop.europa.eu/en/about/national-europass-centres

Eurodesk network

The Eurodesk network offers information services to young people and those who work with them on European opportunities in the education, training and youth fields, and the involvement of young people in European activities.

Present in all Programme Countries, and coordinated at European level by the Eurodesk Brussels-link Office, the Eurodesk network offers enquiry answering services, funding information, events and publications. It also contributes to the animation of the European Youth Portal.

The European Youth Portal offers European and national information and opportunities that are of interest to young people who are living, learning and working in Europe. It gives information around eight main themes, covers 33 countries and is available in 27 languages.

To access the European Youth Portal, go to: https://europa.eu/youth/home_en. For more information on Eurodesk, go to: http://www.eurodesk.eu.

Platforms and tools

The Erasmus+ Project Results Platform

The Erasmus+ Project Results Platform provides access to information and results concerning all projects funded under the Erasmus+ Programme and some of the projects funded under its predecessor programmes in the field of education, training, youth and sports. Organisations can find their inspiration in the wealth of project information and make use of the results and lessons learned from 15 years of Erasmus+ implementation.

Projects can be searched by keyword, key action, year, country, topic, type of results, etc. Searches can be saved and constantly updated on the most recent projects, according to pre-defined criteria. Good practice projects - which have been identified in terms of policy relevance, impact, communication potential - are highlighted, and promotional factsheets are available for download.

The Erasmus+ Project Results Platform can be accessed here: https://ec.europa.eu/programmes/erasmus-plus/projects/

eTwinning

eTwinning is a community of teachers from pre-primary to upper secondary schools, hosted on a secure platform accessible only to teachers vetted by national authorities. Participants can involve themselves in many activities: carrying out projects with other schools and classrooms; discussions with colleagues and development of professional networking; involvement in a variety of professional development opportunities (online and face-to-face); etc. eTwinning is funded under Key Action 2 of the Erasmus+ Programme.

Teachers and schools participating in eTwinning receive support from their National Support Services (NSS). These are organisations appointed by the competent national authorities. They assist schools during the process of registration, partner finding and project activity, promote the Action, deliver prizes and quality labels and organise professional development activities for teachers.

The National Support Services are coordinated by a Central Support Service (CSS), which is also responsible for the development of the eTwinning Internet platform and the organisation of teacher professional development activities at European level.

The list of all services and more information available at: http://www.etwinning.net/en/pub/get_support/contact.htm  

The School Education Gateway (SEG)

The School Education Gateway is Europe’s online platform for school education, currently available in 23 EU languages, intended to provide everything that teachers need in terms of information, learning and professional development, peer support and networking, collaborative project and mobility opportunities, policy insights etc. Apart from the teacher community, the target user base of the SEG includes all parties participating in activities under the Erasmus+ Programme such as: schools and other educational actors and organizations; policy makers and national authorities; NGOs; enterprises; etc.  As it is a public website, it can be accessed by anyone on Internet (i.e. also from countries outside the EU). This wide reach is expected to improve the links between policy and practice in European school education, as well as help promote policy based on the reality of what is happening at schools and what is needed by the job market.

The SEG offers a wide range of content, such as good practices from European projects; monthly blog contributions and video interviews of European school education experts; online courses for teachers to help tackle topical classroom challenges; resources such as teaching materials, tutorials and the European Toolkit for Schools; information on school education policies; topical news and events; etc. It offers special tools to support teachers and school staff in finding training and mobility opportunities for professional development (on-site courses, job shadowing, teaching assignments etc.), which can be funded under Erasmus+ Key Action 1:

  • Erasmus+ tool "Course Catalogue" (for face-to-face training opportunities);
  • Erasmus+ tool "Mobility Opportunities" (for teacher mobility under KA1)

http://schooleducationgateway.eu

EPALE

The Electronic Platform for Adult Learning in Europe – known as EPALE – is an initiative of the European Commission funded by the Erasmus+ Programme. It is open to adult learning professionals: teachers, trainers and volunteers, as well as policy-makers, researchers, journalists and academics, and others involved in adult learning.

The site offers up-to-date news on developments in the field and interactive networks, enabling users to link with others all around Europe, engage in discussions and exchange good practice. Amongst many tools and content, EPALE offers instruments of specific interest for Erasmus+ (potential) beneficiaries. Some examples include:

  • A Calendar of courses and events, which can be used
    • to find mobility opportunities to beneficiaries of KA1 projects
    • to promote courses and events organised by KA2 projects
  • A Partner-search tool, useful to find partners to prepare an EU-funded project or to find or offer a job shadowing opportunity.
  • Communities of practice offer an additional facility to liaise with people and organisations with similar interest
  • Collaborative spaces, where project partners can work in a safe environment to develop their project
  • A Resource centre, where project beneficiaries can source useful reference material and /or post articles, teaching materials, reports, manuals, and any other material produced by their project or their organisation, hence offering an additional dissemination opportunity
  • A Blog, where participants in projects can share their experience or upload videos presenting their results in an informal and dynamic way.

Projects that receive EU funding are encouraged to share information on their activities and results on the platform through blog posts, news, events and other kinds of activities.

EPALE is implemented by a Central Support Service and a network of National Support Services in Erasmus+ Programme countries, which are in charge of identifying interesting information and encourage stakeholders to use and contribute to the platform. EPALE can be accessed at: https://epale.ec.europa.eu/.

SELFIE

SELFIE (“Self-reflection on Effective Learning by Fostering the use of Innovative Educational technologies”) is a free, multilingual, web-based, self-reflection tool to help general and vocational schools develop their digital capacity.

SELFIE for Schools anonymously gathers the views of students, teachers and school leaders on how technology is used in their school. This is done using short statements and questions and a simple 1-5 answer scale. Based on this input, the tool generates a report – a snapshot (‘SELFIE’) of a school‘s strengths and weaknesses in their use of technology. SELFIE is available for any primary, secondary and vocational schools in Europe and beyond, and in over 30 languages. It can be used by any school – not just those with advanced levels of infrastructure, equipment and technology use.

The Covid-19 crisis has shown a massive shift towards digital technologies for remote working and learning, including for VET. It also demonstrated the difficulty of maintaining the work-based learning (WBL) part of VET in companies, which makes it even more urgent to increase the effectiveness of the dialogue between VET teachers and in-company trainers via digital means.

As part of the Digital Education Action Plan, a new tool for teachers is under development. This tool (‘SELFIE for Teachers’) which will be available in all official EU languages in Autumn 2021 will allow teachers to self-assess their digital competence and confidence and to get immediate feedback on strengths and gaps and where they can further develop. Teams of teachers can also work together to use the tool and develop a training plan.

In early 2020, a feasibility study on adapting the SELFIE tool for WBL in VET concluded there is a need for a SELFIE for WBL to bring VET institutions and companies closer together to jointly discuss how to best embed digital technology in the education and training provided. SELFIE for WBL not only gathers the three perspectives of school leaders, VET teachers and learners, but also adds as a fourth perspective the view of in-company trainers. In autumn 2020, nine countries conducted successful pilots for extending SELFIE to WBL, including related to apprenticeships, involving a large number of stakeholders. SELFIE for WBL is expected to be operational for a full roll-out by mid-2021.

SELFIE has been developed by the Joint Research Centre and Directorate General for Education, Youth, Sport and Culture (DG EAC). More information about SELFIE can be found here: https://ec.europa.eu/education/schools-go-digital_en

HEInnovate

The HEInnovate guiding framework offers Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) in the EU and beyond the opportunity to examine their innovation and entrepreneurship capacities through self-reflection in one or several of eight dimensions available, which are:

  • Leadership and Governance
  • Organisational Capacity: Funding, People and Incentives
  • Entrepreneurial Teaching and Learning
  • Preparing and Supporting Entrepreneurs
  • Digital Transformation and Capability
  • Knowledge Exchange and Collaboration
  • The Internationalised Institution
  • Measuring Impact

HEInnovate is also a community of practice and its experts offer workshops for HEIs to improve their innovation performance and train the trainers events to disseminate the approach more widely at national level. Training materials are available on the website. The platform also provides case studies and user stories to showcase examples of different innovation approaches in HEIs throughout the EU. A number of Country Reviews have been done in collaboration with the OECD and are available on the HEInnovate and OECD websites. The HEInnovate Country Reports show innovation and entrepreneurship approaches in different EU member states.

Erasmus-funded projects such as the European University Alliances and the Alliances for Innovation are invited to use HEInnovate where relevant to accompany their projects.

HEInnovate can be accessed at: https://heinnovate.eu/en

The European Youth Portal

The European Youth Portal offers European and national information and opportunities that are of interest to young people who are living, learning and working in Europe. It also encourages the participation of young people in democratic life in Europe notably via the EU Youth Dialogue and other initiatives to engage with young people to influence policy making. The European Youth Portal also provides information for other stakeholders working in the field of youth, is available in 28 languages and can be accessed here: https://europa.eu/youth/

Otlas

One of the tools developed and hosted by the SALTO-Youth Resource Centres is Otlas, a central online partner finding tool for organisations in the youth field. Organisations can register their contact details and areas of interest in Otlas, and also create partner requests for project ideas.

More information available at: www.salto-youth.net/otlas  or www.otlas.eu

European Student Card Initiative

The European Student Card Initiative aims at simplifying learning and training mobility by digitalising all the main components necessary for the organisation of student mobility, from information provision to application processes and settling into the host community while abroad. In the context of this initiative, the Erasmus+ Mobile App and Erasmus without Paper Network are now available for higher education institutions and students and will be further enhanced by adding new services and features for users.

The Erasmus+ Mobile App gives students a single online point of access to all the information and services they need before, during, and after their exchanges abroad. The Erasmus+ Mobile App also includes information about participation in the programme for learners in other sectors. The app is available for download in the App store and on Google Play. More information can be found at: erasmusapp.eu

The Erasmus without Paper Network allows higher education institutions to connect to a central communication channel to exchange seamlessly student mobility data in a secure and streamlined manner supporting a fully digitalised mobility management, including online learning agreements and digital inter-institutional agreements. Higher education institutions that are looking to connect to the Erasmus without Paper Network can access information on how to connect, guidelines and tutorials by visiting the Erasmus without Paper Competence Centre: https://cc.erasmuswithoutpaper.eu

Knowledge and expert networks

Eurydice network

The Eurydice network primarily focuses on the way education in Europe is structured and organised at all levels and aims at contributing towards a better mutual understanding of systems in Europe. It provides those responsible for education systems and policies in Europe with European-level comparative analyses and national specific information in the fields of education and youth, which will assist them in their decision-making.

The Eurydice Network produces a vast source of information, including detailed descriptions and overviews of national education systems (National Education systems and Policies), comparative thematic reports devoted to specific topics of Community interest (Thematic Reports), indicators and statistics (Key Data Series), and a series of facts and figures related to education, such as national education structures, school calendars, comparison of teacher salaries and of required taught time for countries and education levels (Facts and Figures).

It consists of a central coordinating unit located at the Executive Agency and national units based in all Erasmus+ Programme Countries plus Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina and Montenegro. 

More information is available on the website of the Executive Agency: https://eacea.ec.europa.eu/homepage

Youth Wiki National Correspondents Network

In line with the EU Youth Strategy and the objective of improving the knowledge on youth issues in Europe, financial support is provided to National Structures contributing to the Youth Wiki, an interactive tool providing information on the situation of young people in Europe and on national youth policies in a coherent, updated and exploitable way.

Financial support is given to the bodies designated by the national authorities, located in a Programme Country, for actions carried out by these bodies for the production of country specific information, comparable country descriptions and indicators which contribute towards a better mutual understanding of youth systems and policies in Europe.

Network of Higher Education Reform Experts (HEREs)

In the Partner Countries concerned (Western Balkans, Eastern and Southern Mediterranean countries, Russia and Central Asia), the National Teams of Higher Education Reform Experts provide a pool of expertise to local authorities and stakeholders to promote reform and enhance progress in higher education. They participate in the development of policies in higher education in their respective country. HERE activities are based on "peer to peer" contacts. Each national team consists of five to fifteen members. The HEREs are experts in the field of higher education (Rectors, Vice-Rectors, Deans, senior academics, international relations officers, students etc.).

The mission of the HEREs involves supporting:

  • policy development in their respective countries, by supporting modernisation, reform processes and strategies in higher education, in close contact with the local authorities concerned;
  • policy dialogue with the EU in the field of higher education;
  • training and counselling activities targeted at local stakeholders, in particular higher education institutions and their staff;
  • Erasmus+ projects (in particular those implemented under the Capacity-building Action) by disseminating their results and outcomes, notably good practices and innovative initiatives and exploiting these for training purposes.

National Teams to support the implementation of EU VET tools

The purpose of the national teams of VET experts is to provide a pool of expertise to promote the application of EU VET tools and principles in EU funded projects supported by the Erasmus+ Programme. The concerned EU VET tools are laid down in the relevant EU VET policy documents such as the European Framework for Quality and Effective Apprenticeships and the Council Recommendation on VET (such as the EQAVET Framework, EU core profiles, graduate tracking and others). The experts should in particular provide support to the beneficiaries of EU funded projects supported by the Erasmus+ Programme to implement the abovementioned EU VET tools in their projects.

Network of EQAVET National Reference Points

The EQAVET National Reference Points (NRPs) are established by national authorities and bring together existing relevant bodies involving the social partners and all stakeholders concerned at national and regional levels, to contribute to the implementation of the European framework for quality assurance in VET as defined in the Council Recommendation on vocational education and training for sustainable competitiveness, social fairness and resilience.

The EQAVET NRPs aim to 1) take concrete initiatives to implement and further develop the EQAVET Framework 2) inform and mobilise a wide range of stakeholders to contribute to implementing the EQAVET framework 3) support self-evaluation as a complementary and effective means of quality assurance 4) provide an updated description of the national/regional quality assurance arrangements based on the EQAVET Framework and 5) engage in EU level peer reviews of quality assurance at VET system level.

EQF, Europass and Euroguidance - National centres

For each country, these three networks of national centres are supported through one single agreement:

European Qualifications Framework National Coordination Points (EQF NCPs)

The EQF NCPs, designated by national authorities, support them in:

  • developing, implementing and reviewing national qualifications frameworks and referencing them to the European Qualification Framework (EQF);
  • reviewing and updating, when relevant, the referencing of the levels of the national qualifications frameworks or systems to the levels of the EQF.

EQF NCPs bring the EQF closer to individuals and organizations by:

  • supporting the inclusion of the appropriate EQF levels on certificates, diplomas, supplements and other qualification documents and on databases of qualifications;
  • developing qualification registers or databases that include qualifications included in the national qualification frameworks and publishing them on the Europass portal.

More information available at: https://europa.eu/europass/en/implementation-european-qualifications-fra...

Europass National Centres

The main feature of Europass is an online platform that provides individuals and organisations with interactive tools and information on learning opportunities, qualifications frameworks and qualifications, guidance, skills intelligence, self-assessment tools and documentation of skills and qualifications, and connectivity with learning and employment opportunities. This requires substantial work at national level, carried out by bodies designated by national authorities. This includes in particular:

  • Making national information available for the EU platform, namely ensuring the interconnection between the EU platform and national data sources for learning opportunities and national qualifications databases or registers;
  • Promoting the use of the services provided by the EU platform;
  • Liaising with all relevant stakeholders at national level.

Euroguidance network

Euroguidance is a European network of national resource and information centres, designated by national authorities. All Euroguidance centres share the following common goals:

  • cooperation and support at Union level to strengthen policies, systems and practices for guidance within the Union (the development of the European dimension of lifelong guidance);  
  • support competence development of guidance practitioners;
  • provide quality information on lifelong guidance
  • promote European opportunities for learning mobility and career management (through the Europass portal).

The main target group of Euroguidance is guidance practitioners and policy makers from both the educational and employment sectors. More information available at: http://euroguidance.eu

Who can participate in the Erasmus+ Programme?

Individuals constitute the main target population of the Programme. However, the Programme reaches these individuals mainly through organisations, institutions, bodies or groups that organise such activities. The conditions of access to the Programme therefore relate to these two actors: the "participants" (individuals participating in the Programme) and the "participating organisations" (including informal groups and self-employed persons1 ). For both participants and participating organisations, the conditions for participation depend on the country in which they are based.

Participants in Erasmus+ project activities:

As a general rule, participants in Erasmus+ projects must be established in a Programme Country. Some Actions, notably in the fields of higher education, vocational education and training, and youth, are also open to participants from Partner Countries.

The specific conditions for participating in an Erasmus+ project depend on the type of Action concerned.

In general terms, the main target groups are:

  • For projects relevant for the field of higher education, the main targets are: higher education students (short cycle, first, second or third cycle), higher education teachers and professors, staff of higher education institutions, trainers and professionals in enterprises;
  • For projects relevant for the field of vocational education and training, the main targets are: apprentices and students in vocational education and training, professionals and trainers in vocational education and training, staff of initial vocational education and training organisations, trainers and professionals in enterprises;
  • For projects relevant for the field of school education, the main targets are: school leaders, school teachers and school staff, pupils in pre-primary, primary and secondary education;
  • For projects relevant for the field of adult education, the main targets are: members of non-vocational adult education organisations, trainers, staff and learners in non-vocational adult education;
  • For projects relevant for the youth field the main targets are: young people from 13 to 302, youth workers, staff and members of organisations active in the youth field;
  • For projects relevant to the field of sport, the main targets are: professionals and volunteers in the field of sport, athletes and coaches.

For more details on the conditions for participation in each specific Action, please consult Part B of this Guide.

Eligible participating organisations

Erasmus+ projects are submitted and managed by participating organisations. If a project is selected, the applicant organisation becomes a beneficiary of an Erasmus+ grant. Beneficiaries sign a grant agreement or are notified of a grant decision which entitles them to receive financial support for the realisation of their project (grant agreements are not signed with individual participants).

As a general rule, organisations participating in Erasmus+ projects must be established in a Programme Country. Some Actions are also open to participating organisations from Partner Countries, notably in the field of higher education, vocational education and training, and youth.

The specific conditions for participating in an Erasmus+ project depend on the type of Action supported by the Programme. In general terms, the Programme is open to any organisation active in the fields of education, training, youth or sport. Several Actions are also open to the participation of other players in the labour market.
For more details, please consult Part B of this Guide.

  • 1. Natural persons are not eligible to directly apply for a grant to the Erasmus+ National Agencies or the Executive Agency EACEA (with the exception of self-employed persons (i.e. sole traders, where the company does not have legal personality separate from that of the natural person).
    Entities which do not have legal personality under their national law may exceptionally participate, provided that their representatives have the capacity to undertake legal obligations on their behalf, and offer guarantees for the protection of the EU financial interests equivalent to that offered by legal persons.) .
  • 2. Different age limits apply depending on the different types of activities. For more information please consult Part B of this Guide. Please also consider the following:  
  • lower age limits - participants must have reached the minimum age at the start date of the activity.
  • upper age limits - participants must not be older than the indicated maximum age at the start date of the activity.

Eligible countries

EU Member States take part in the Erasmus+ Programme. In addition, in accordance with article 16 of the Erasmus+ Regulation, the following third countries are associated to the programme1:

  • members of the European Free Trade Association (EFTA) which are members of the European Economic Area (EEA): Norway, Iceland, Liechtenstein;
  • acceding countries, candidate countries and potential candidates: Republic of North Macedonia, Republic of Turkey and Republic of Serbia;

The EU Member States and the above mentioned third countries associated to the programme will be hereafter called “Programme Countries”.

In addition, in accordance with article 17 of the Regulation, entities from other third countries non-associated to the Programme can be eligible in Erasmus+ actions in duly justified cases and in the Union interest (hereafter called “Partner Countries”).

Programme Countries

The following countries can fully take part in all the Actions of the Erasmus+ Programme:

Member States of the European Union (EU)2

Belgium, Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Denmark, Germany, Estonia, Ireland, Greece, Spain, France, Croatia, Italy, Cyprus, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Hungary, Malta, Netherlands, Austria, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovenia, Slovakia, Finland, Sweden

Non EU Programme Countries3

  • Republic of North Macedonia
  • Serbia
  • Iceland
  • Liechtenstein
  • Norway
  • Turkey

Partner Countries

The following countries can take part in certain Actions of the Programme, subject to specific criteria or conditions (for more information, please consult Part B of this Guide). Funding will be allocated to organisations in the countries within their territories as recognised by international law. Applicants and participants must respect any restrictions placed on EU external assistance imposed by the European Council. Applications have to be in line with the overall EU values of respect for human dignity, freedom, democracy, equality, the rule of law and respect for human rights, including the rights of persons belonging to minorities as foreseen in art 2 of the Treaty of the European Union.

The Partner Countries below are regrouped according to the financial instruments of the EU External Action.

Western Balkans (Region 1)

Albania; Bosnia and Herzegovina; Kosovo4; Montenegro

Eastern Partnership countries (Region 2)

Armenia; Azerbaijan; Belarus; Georgia; Moldova; Territory of Ukraine as recognised by international law

South-Mediterranean countries (Region 3)5

Algeria; Egypt; Israel; Jordan; Lebanon; Libya; Morocco; Palestine6; Syria; Tunisia

Russian Federation (Region 4)

Territory of Russia as recognised by international law

Region 57

Andorra, Monaco, San Marino, Vatican City State

Region 6 Asia8

Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, Cambodia, China, DPR Korea, India, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Maldives, Mongolia, Myanmar, Nepal, Pakistan, Philippines, Sri Lanka, Thailand and Vietnam

Region 7 Central Asia9

Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan

Region 8 Latin America10

Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Venezuela

Region 911

Iran, Iraq, Yemen

Region 1012

South Africa

Region 11 ACP

Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Benin, Botswana, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Comoros, Congo, Congo - Democratic Republic of the, Cook Islands, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Fiji, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Grenada, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Republic of Côte d'Ivoire, Jamaica, Kenya, Kiribati, Lesotho, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Marshall Islands, Mauritania, Mauritius, Micronesia- Federated States of, Mozambique, Namibia, Nauru, Niger, Nigeria, Niue, Palau, Papua New Guinea, Rwanda, Saint Kitts And Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent And The Grenadines, Samoa, Sao Tome and Principe, Senegal, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Suriname, Eswatini, Timor Leste - Democratic Republic of, Tanzania, Togo, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Tuvalu, Uganda, Vanuatu, Zambia, Zimbabwe.

Region 12 Industrialised: Gulf Cooperation countries13

Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates.

Region 13 Other Industrialised countries14

Australia, Brunei, Canada, Chile, Hong Kong, Japan, (Republic of) Korea, Macao, New Zealand, Singapore, Taiwan, United States of America, Uruguay.

Region 1415

Faroe Islands, Switzerland, United Kingdom.

For more information, please consult the detailed description of the Actions of the Programme in the Part B of this Guide. 

Requirements regarding visa and residence permits

Participants in Erasmus+ projects may need to obtain a visa for staying abroad in the Programme or Partner Country hosting the activity. It is a responsibility of all the participating organisations to ensure that the authorisations required (short or long-term stay visas or residence permits) are in order before the planned activity takes place. It is strongly recommended that the authorisations are requested from the competent authorities well in advance, since the process may take several weeks. National Agencies and the Executive Agency may give further advice and support concerning visas, residence permits, social security, etc. The EU Immigration Portal contains general information on visa and residence permits, for both short-term and long-term stays: https://ec.europa.eu/immigration/

  • 1. Subject to the signature of the Association Agreements between the European Union and those countries.
  • 2. According to Article 33.3 of the Council Decision 2013/755/EU* on the Association of the OCTs with the European Union adopted on 25 November 2013 (http://eur-lex.europa.eu/LexUriServ/LexUriServ.do?uri=OJ:L:2013:344:0001...), the Union shall ensure that individuals and organisations from or to Overseas Countries and Territories (OCT) shall be eligible for the Erasmus, subject to the rules of the Programme and the arrangements applicable to the Member State with which these OCTs they are connected. This means that individuals and organisations from the OCTs are participating in the programme on a 'Programme country' status, the 'Programme country' being the Member State with which they are connected. The list of OCTs can be found at: https://ec.europa.eu/europeaid/regions/overseas-countries-and-territorie...
  • 3. Subject to the signature of the Association Agreements between the European Union and those countries
  • 4. This designation is without prejudice to positions on status, and is in line with UNSCR 1244 and the ICJ Opinion on the Kosovo declaration of independence.
  • 5. The eligibility criteria formulated in Commission notice Nr.2013/C-205/05 (OJEU C-205 of 19/07/2013, pp. 9-11) shall apply for all actions implemented through this Programme Guide, including with respect to third parties receiving financial support in the cases where the respective action involves financial support to third parties by grant beneficiaries in accordance with article 204 of the EU's Financial Regulation.
  • 6.   This designation shall not be construed as recognition of a State of Palestine and is without prejudice to the individual positions of the Member States on this issue.
  • 7. Countries not covered by the External Action Instruments.
  • 8. Classification used in the framework of the Neighbourhood, Development and International Cooperation Instrument (NDICI) and the proposed Instrument for Pre-Accession Assistance (IPA III).
  • 9. As above
  • 10. As above
  • 11. As above
  • 12. As above
  • 13. Classification used in the framework of the Partnership Instrument (PI).
  • 14. Classification used in the framework of the Partnership Instrument (PI).
  • 15. Countries not covered by the External Action Instruments.

Mobility for pupils and staff in school education

This action supports schools and other organisations active in the field of school education that want to organise learning mobility activities for school pupils and staff.

A wide range of activities are supported, including job shadowing and professional development courses for staff, individual and group mobility for pupils, invited experts, and other activities as explained below.

The participating organisations should actively promote inclusion and diversity, environmental sustainability and digital education through their activities: by using the specific funding opportunities provided by the Programme for these purposes, by raising awareness among their participants, by sharing best practices, and by choosing appropriate design for their activities

Objectives of the Action

The purpose of mobility activities funded by Erasmus+ is to provide learning opportunities to individuals and to support internationalisation and institutional development of schools and other organisations in school education. Specifically, the objectives of this action are:

Strengthening the European dimension of teaching and learning by:

  • promoting values of inclusion and diversity, tolerance, and democratic participation
  • promoting knowledge about shared European heritage and diversity
  • supporting development of professional networks across Europe

Increasing the quality of teaching and learning in school education by:

  • supporting professional development of teachers, school leaders and other school staff
  • promoting the use of new technologies and innovative teaching methods
  • improving language learning and language diversity in schools
  • supporting the sharing and transfer of best practices in teaching and school development

Contributing to the creation of the European Education Area by:

  • building capacity of schools to engage in cross-border exchanges and cooperation, and carry out high quality mobility projects
  • making learning mobility a realistic possibility for any pupil in school education
  • fostering recognition of learning outcomes of pupils and staff in mobility periods abroad

How to access Erasmus+ mobility opportunities?

Schools and other organisations active in school education can apply for funding in two ways:

  • Short-term projects for mobility of pupils and staff provide applicant organisations with an opportunity to organise various mobility activities over a period of six to eighteen months. Short-term projects are the best choice for organisations trying Erasmus+ for the first time, or for those that wish to organise only a limited number of activities.
  • Accredited projects for mobility of pupils and staff are open only to organisations holding an Erasmus accreditation in the field of school education. This special funding strand allows accredited organisations to regularly receive funding for mobility activities that contribute to the gradual implementation of their Erasmus Plan. Erasmus accreditations are open to all organisations that want to organise mobility activities on a regular basis. Previous experience in the Programme is not required to apply. To find out more about this opportunity, please read the chapter of this guide on Erasmus accreditation in the fields of adult education, vocational education and training, and school education.

In addition, organisations can join the Programme without submitting an application by:

  • Joining an existing Erasmus mobility consortium led by an accredited consortium coordinator in their country that is accepting new members in their consortium.
  • Hosting participants from another country: any organisation can become a host for learners or staff coming from a partner organisation abroad. Becoming a hosting organisation is a valuable experience and a good way to create partnerships and learn more about the Programme before applying yourself.

Schools are also encouraged to join eTwinning: an online a community hosted on a secure platform accessible to teachers verified by the eTwinning service in each country. eTwinning allows schools to set up joint virtual classrooms and carry out projects with other schools, it allows teachers to discuss and exchange with colleagues and to get involved in a variety of professional development opportunities. eTwinning is also the perfect environment to find partners for future projects.

Setting up a project

The applicant organisation is the key actor in a Key Action 1 project. The applicant drafts and submits the application, signs the grant agreement, implements the mobility activities, and reports to their National Agency. The application process for both short-term projects and the Erasmus accreditation focuses on the needs and plans of the applicant organisation.

Most types of available activities are outgoing mobility activities. This means that the applicant organisation will act as a sending organisation: it will select participants and send them to a hosting organisation abroad. Using these opportunities to organise two-way exchanges or joint activities with one or more partner schools is strongly encouraged. In that case, each participating school should apply for Erasmus+ funding or they can join an existing consortium. To make the process of finding partners easier, Erasmus+ supports tools for finding partners abroad: School Education Gateway (www.schooleducationgateway.eu) and eTwinning (www.etwinning.net).

In addition, there are special types of activities that allow applicant organisations to invite experts or teachers in training to their organisation. The purpose of incoming activities is not to create two-way exchanges, but rather to bring in persons who can help develop and internationalise the applicant organisation.
Implementation of all activities supported under this Action must follow the Erasmus quality standards. The Erasmus quality standards cover concrete implementation practices for project tasks such as selection and preparation of participants, definition, evaluation and recognition of learning outcomes, sharing of project results, etc. To read the full text of the Erasmus quality standards, please visit the following link at the Europa website: https://ec.europa.eu/programmes/erasmus-plus/resources/documents/erasmus...

Inclusion and diversity

In line with the Erasmus quality standards, organisations that receive support from the Programme must ensure that they offer mobility opportunities in an inclusive and equitable way, to participants from all backgrounds. The selection of learners that will take part in project activities should take into account key factors such as motivation, merit, as well as personal development and learning needs of the participants. Similarly, selection of staff participants should ensure that benefits of their professional development are available to all learners in the organisation.

Throughout the preparation, implementation and follow-up of mobility activities, the sending and hosting organisations should involve the participants in key decisions to ensure maximum benefits and impact for each participant. 

Participating organisations that provide education and training are encouraged to actively create and facilitate mobility opportunities, for example by establishing mobility windows in their academic calendar and defining standard re-integration steps for returning participants.

Environmentally sustainable and responsible practices

In line with the Erasmus quality standards, organisations that receive support from the Programme must promote environmentally sustainable and responsible behaviour among their participants, raising the awareness about the importance of acting to reduce or compensate for the environmental footprint of mobility activities. These principles should be reflected in the preparation and implementation of all Programme activities, especially by using specific funding support provided by the Programme to promote sustainable means of travel. Organisations providing education and training should integrate these principles in their everyday work, and should actively promote a change of mind-set and behaviour among their learners and staff.

Digital transition in education and training

In line with the Erasmus quality standards, the Programme supports all participating organisations in incorporating the use of digital tools and learning methods to complement their physical activities, to improve the cooperation between partner organisations, and to improve the quality of their learning and teaching. In addition, teaching and administrative staff can also benefit from digital skills training programmes to acquire relevant digital skills for making use of digital technologies in courses and for digitalising administration.

Activities

This section presents the types of activities that can be supported by Erasmus+ funds, both as part of short-term projects and accredited projects.

For any activity, additional support can be provided for persons accompanying participants with fewer opportunities, minors, or young adults that require supervision. Accompanying persons can be supported for whole or part of the activity’s duration.

Staff mobility

Eligible activities

  • Job shadowing (2 to 60 days)
  • Teaching assignments (2 to 365 days)
  • Courses and training (2 to 30 days)

n case of courses and training, eligible course fees will be limited to a total of 10 days per participant. The choice of courses and training is a responsibility of the applicants. The following quality standards were designed to guide the applicants in their choice of course providers: https://ec.europa.eu/programmes/erasmus-plus/resources/quality-standards...

In addition to physical mobility, all staff mobility activities can be blended with virtual activities. The minimum and maximum durations specified above apply to the physical mobility component.

Eligible participants

Eligible participants include teachers, school leaders and all other non-teaching experts and staff working in school education.

Eligible non-teaching staff includes staff working in school education, either in schools (teacher assistants, pedagogical advisors, psychologists, etc.) or in other organisations active in school education (e.g. school inspectors, counsellors, policy coordinators in charge of school education, etc.).

Participants must be working in the sending organisation, or must be regularly working with the sending organisation to help implement the organisation’s core activities (for example as external trainers, experts, or volunteers).

In all cases, the tasks that link the participant to the sending organisation must be documented in a way that allows the National Agency to verify this link (for example with a work or volunteer contract, task description, or a similar document). The National Agencies shall establish a transparent and consistent practice on what constitutes acceptable working relationships and supporting documentation in their national context.

Eligible venues

Activities must take place abroad, in a Programme Country.

Learner mobility

Available formats

  • Group mobility of school pupils (2 to 30 days, at least two pupils per group)
  • Short-term learning mobility of pupils (10 to 29 days)
  • Long-term learning mobility of pupils (30 to 365 days)

In addition to physical mobility, all pupil mobility activities can be blended with virtual activities. The minimum and maximum durations specified above apply to the physical mobility component.

Group mobility of school pupils: a group of pupils from the sending school can spend time learning together with their peers in another country. Teachers or other authorised persons from the sending school must accompany the pupils for the entire duration of the activity.

Short-term learning mobility of school pupils: pupils can spend a period abroad to study at a partner school or perform a traineeship at another relevant organisation abroad. An individual learning programme must be defined for each participant. For participants with fewer opportunities, mobility can be organised with a minimum duration of 2 days, if justified.

Long-term learning mobility of school pupils: pupils can spend a period abroad to study at a partner school or perform a traineeship at another relevant organisation abroad. An individual learning programme must be defined for each participant. An obligatory pre-departure training will be provided to all participants.

Eligible participants

Participating pupils must be enrolled in an education programme at the sending school1

Eligible venues

Activities must take place abroad, in a Programme Country.

Group mobility of school pupils must take place at a hosting school, unless another venue is better justified by the content and quality of the activity. In that case, activities may exceptionally take place at another venue in the country of the hosting school or at the seat of an Institution of the European Union. Regardless of the venue, the activity must involve pupils from at least two Programme countries.

Other supported activities

Available formats

  • Invited experts (2 to 60 days)
  • Hosting teachers and educators in training (10 to 365 days)
  • Preparatory visits

Invited experts: schools can invite trainers, teachers, policy experts or other qualified professionals from abroad who can help improve the teaching and learning at the receiving school. For example, invited experts may provide training to the school staff, demonstrate new teaching methods or help transfer good practices in organisation and management.

Hosting teachers and educators in training: applicant organisations can host teachers in training who want to spend a traineeship period abroad. The hosting organisation will receive support to set up the activity, while the travel and individual support for the participant should be provided by their sending institution (which may apply for Erasmus+ funding for this purpose).

Preparatory visits: organisations can set up a preparatory visit to their hosting partner before the mobility takes place. Preparatory visits are not a stand-alone activity, but a supporting arrangement for mobility of staff or learners. Each preparatory visit must have a clear reasoning and must serve to improve inclusiveness, scope and quality of mobility activities. For example, preparatory visits can be organised to better prepare mobility of participants with fewer opportunities, to start working with a new partner organisation, or to prepare longer mobility activities. Preparatory visits cannot be organised to prepare a course or training activity for staff.

Eligible participants

Invited experts can be any persons from another Programme Country with relevant expertise in school education.

Hosting teachers and educators in training is available for participants who are enrolled in or recently graduated  from a teacher education programme (or a similar kind of education programme for trainers or educators) in another Programme Country.

Preparatory visits can be carried out by any persons eligible for staff mobility activities and involved in the organisation of the project. Exceptionally, learners who will take part in long-term learning mobility and participants with fewer opportunities in any type of activity can take part in preparatory visits for their activities.

Eligible venues

Preparatory visits can take place in Programme Countries.

The venue for invited experts and teachers in training is always the beneficiary organisation (including consortium members)

Short-term projects for mobility of pupils and staff in school education

Short-term projects for mobility of pupils and staff are a straightforward and simple way to benefit from Erasmus+. Their purpose is to allow organisations to organise a few activities in an easy way and to gain experience in the Programme.

In order to stay simple, short-term projects include a limit on the number of participants and the duration of the project. The format is open only to individual organisations and not to consortium coordinators. Accredited organisations cannot apply for short-term projects since they already have permanent access to Erasmus+ funding.

The application for short-term projects includes a list and description of activities that the applicant organisation plans to organise.

Eligibility criteria

Eligible organisations: who can apply?

The following organisations are eligible to apply2:

  1. Schools providing general education at pre-primary, primary or secondary level3
  2. Local and regional public authorities, coordination bodies and other organisations with a role in the field of school education

However, organisations holding an Erasmus accreditation in school education cannot apply for short-term projects.

Eligible countries

Applicant organisations must be established in a Programme Country.

Where to submit an application?

Applications are submitted to the National Agency of the country where the applicant organisation is established.

Application deadlines

Round 1 for all National Agencies: 11 May at 12:00:00 (midday Brussels time)

Round 2 for National Agencies that decide to open a second deadline: 5 October at 12:00:00 (midday Brussels time)

The National Agencies will inform the applicants about the opening of the second deadline through their website.

Project start dates

Projects can choose the following start dates:

  • Round 1: between 1 September and 31 December of the same year
  • Round 2: between 1 January and 31 May of the following year

Project duration

From 6 to 18 months

Number of applications

Per selection round, an organisation may apply for only one short-term project in the field of school education.

Organisations that receive a grant for a short-term project under the first round of applications may not apply for the second round of the same call for proposals.

Within a period of any five consecutive call years, organisations may receive a maximum of three grants for short-term projects in school education. Grants received in the 2014-2020 period do not count towards this limit.

Available activities

All types of activities for school education. For a detailed list and rules, see section ’Activities’.

Project scope

An application for a short-term project can include a maximum of 30 participants in mobility activities.

Preparatory visits and participation of accompanying persons will not count towards this limit.

Award criteria

Submitted applications will be assessed by assigning points out of a total of 100, based on the below criteria and weightings. To be considered for award, applications must pass the following thresholds:

  • At least 60 out of the total 100 points, and
  • At least half of the maximum points in each of the three award criteria categories

Relevance (maximum score 30 points)

The extent to which:

  • the applicant’s profile, experience, activities and target population of learners are relevant for the field of school education
  • the project proposal is relevant for the objectives of the action
  • the project proposal is relevant for the following specific priorities:
    • ­    supporting newcomers and less experienced organisations
    • ­    supporting participants in long-term learning mobility of pupils
    • ­    supporting participants with fewer opportunities

Quality of project design (maximum score 40 points)

The extent to which:

  • the proposed project objectives address the needs of the applicant organisation, its staff and learners in a clear and concrete way
  • the proposed activities and their content are appropriate for the achievement of the project objectives
  • there is a clear plan of working for each of the proposed activities
  • the project incorporates environmentally sustainable and responsible practices
  • the project incorporates the use of digital tools (eTwinning in particular) and learning methods to complement their physical mobility activities, and to improve the cooperation with partner organisations

Quality of follow-up actions (maximum score 30 points)

The extent to which:

  • the applicant has proposed concrete and logical steps to integrate the results of mobility activities in the organisation’s regular work
  • the applicant has proposed an appropriate way of evaluating the project outcomes
  • the applicant has proposed concrete and effective steps to make the results of the project known within the applicant organisation, to share the results with other organisations and the public, and to publicly acknowledge the European Union funding

Accredited projects for mobility of pupils and staff in school education

Organisations holding an Erasmus accreditation in school education can apply for funding as part of a special funding strand open only for them. Applications are based on the previously approved Erasmus Plan, so a detailed list and description of the planned activities is not required. Instead, the applications focus on estimating the budget needed for the next set of activities.

Eligibility criteria

Eligible organisations: who can apply?

Organisations holding a valid Erasmus accreditation in school education are eligible to apply.

Mobility consortium

Organisations holding an Erasmus accreditation for mobility consortium coordinators must apply for the mobility consortium format.

List of mobility consortium members must be provided as part of the application and must include at least one member organisation in addition to the coordinator.
Any organisation meeting the eligibility criteria for an accredited mobility project can become a member of a mobility consortium. Consortium members are not required to have an Erasmus accreditation.

Organisations taking part in a mobility consortium can receive funding from a maximum of two Key Action 1 grant agreements in the field of school education under the same Call for proposals. Therefore, school education organisations that receive a grant for a short-term project or an accredited project can additionally take part in only one school education mobility consortium as member organisations. Other organisations can take part in up to two mobility consortia.

Where to submit an application?

Applications are submitted to the National Agency of the country where the applicant organisation is established.

Application deadline

11 May at 12:00:00 (midday Brussels time)

Project start date

1 September of the same year

Project duration

All accredited projects will have an initial duration of 15 months. After 12 months, all beneficiaries will have the possibility to prolong their project to a total duration of 24 months.

Number of applications

Accredited organisations may apply only once per selection round.

Available activities

All types of activities for school education. For a detailed list and rules, see section ’Activities’.

Project scope

The number of participants that can be included in accredited projects is not limited, apart from any limitations defined at the budget allocation stage.

Budget allocation

The quality of the applicant’s Erasmus Plan has been assessed at the accreditation application stage and therefore no qualitative assessment will take place at budget allocation stage. Any eligible grant application will receive funding.

The awarded grant amount will depend on a number of elements:

  • the total budget available for allocation to accredited applicants
  • the requested activities
  • the basic and maximum grant
  • the following allocation criteria: financial performance, qualitative performance, policy priorities, and geographical balance (if applied by the National Agency)

Detailed rules on basic and maximum grant, scoring of the allocation criteria, weighting of each criterion, the allocation method, and the budget available for accredited projects will be published by the National Agency ahead of the call deadline.

What are the funding rules?

The following funding rules will apply for short-term projects and accredited projects.

Budget category Eligible costs and applicable rules Amount
Organisational Support

Costs directly linked to the implementation of mobility activities that are not covered by other cost categories.

For example: preparation (pedagogical, intercultural and other), mentoring, monitoring and support of participants during mobility, services, tools and equipment needed for virtual components in blended activities, recognition of learning outcomes, sharing results and making the European Union funding visible to the public.

Organisational support covers the costs incurred by both sending and hosting organisations (except in the case of staff mobility for courses and training). The division of the received grant will be agreed between the two organisations.

Financing mechanism: contribution to unit costs.

Rule of allocation: based on the number of participants.

100 EUR

  • ­Per pupil in group mobility, with a maximum of 1000 EUR per group
  • ­Per participant in staff mobility for courses and training
  • ­Per invited expert
  • ­Per hosted teacher or educator in training

350 EUR; 200 EUR after one hundred participants in the same type of activity

  • ­Per participant in short-term learning mobility of pupils
  • ­Per participant in staff mobility for job shadowing and teaching or training assignments

500 EUR

  • ­Per participant in long-term learning mobility of pupils
Travel

Contribution to the return travel costs of participants and accompanying persons from their place of origin to the venue of the activity.

In addition: contribution to the return travel costs of participants and accompanying persons from their place of origin to the venue of pre-departure training for pupils in long-term mobility.

Financing mechanism: contribution to unit costs.

Rule of allocation: based on the travel distance and number of persons.

The applicant must indicate the air distance between the place of origin and the venue of the activity4 by using the distance calculator supported by the European Commission5

Travel distance Standard travel Green travel
0 – 99 km 23 EUR
100 – 499 km 180 EUR 210 EUR
500 – 1999 km 275 EUR 320 EUR
2000 – 2999 km 360 EUR 410 EUR
3000 – 3999 km 530 EUR 610 EUR
4000 – 7999 km 820 EUR
8000 km or more 1500 EUR
Individual support

Costs of subsistence for participants and accompanying persons6 during the activity.

If necessary: subsistence costs are eligible for travel time before and after the activity, with a maximum of two travel days for participants receiving standard travel grant, and a maximum of four additional days for participants receiving a green travel grant.

Financing mechanism: contribution to unit costs.

Rule of allocation: based on the number of persons, duration of stay and receiving country7.

Category of participants Country group 1 Country group 2 Country group 3
Staff 90 - 180 EUR 80 - 160 EUR 70 - 140 EUR
School pupils 40 - 80 EUR 35 - 70 EUR 30 - 60 EUR

The above are base rates per day of activity. Each NA will decide on exact base rates within the allowed ranges.
The base rate is payable up to the 14th day of activity. From the 15th day of activity, the payable rate will be equal to 70% of the base rate. Payable rates will be rounded to the nearest whole Euro.

Inclusion support

Costs related to the organisation of mobility activities for participants with fewer opportunities.

Financing mechanism: contribution to unit costs

Rule of allocation:  based on the number of participants with fewer opportunities

100 EUR per participant

Additional costs directly linked to participants with fewer opportunities and their accompanying persons (including justified costs related to travel and subsistence if a grant for these participants is not requested through budget categories "Travel" and "Individual support").

Financing mechanism: real costs.

Rule of allocation:  the request must be justified by the applicant and approved by the National Agency.

100% of eligible costs
Preparatory visits

Costs covering travel and subsistence for participation in a preparatory visit.

Financing mechanism: unit costs.

Rule of allocation: based on the number of participants.

575 EUR per participant, with a maximum of three participants per visit
Course fees

Costs covering enrolment fees for courses and training.

Financing mechanism: contribution to unit costs.

Rule of allocation: based on the duration of the activity.

80 EUR per participant per day; an individual staff member may receive a maximum of 800 EUR in course fees within one grant agreement.
Linguistic support

Costs of providing language learning materials and training to participants who need to improve the knowledge of the language they will use to study or receive training during their activity.

Financing mechanism: contribution to unit costs.

Rule of allocation: based on the number of participants.

150 EUR per participant eligible for Online Language Support that cannot receive it due to unavailability of the appropriate language or level, excluding staff in mobility shorter than 31 days. Individual linguistic support is not provided for pupils in group mobility.

In addition: 150 EUR per participant in long-term learning mobility of pupils

Exceptional costs

Costs for providing a financial guarantee, if the National Agency asks for it.
Expensive travel costs of participants and their accompanying persons that cannot be supported with the standard “Travel” category due to geographical remoteness or other barriers.

Financing mechanism: real costs.

Rule of allocation: the request must be justified by the applicant and approved by the National Agency.

Costs for financial guarantee: 80% of eligible costs

Expensive travel costs:  80% of eligible travel costs

  • 1. The definition of eligible education programmes in each Programme Country will be defined by the competent National Authority and published on the website of the relevant National Agency.
  • 2. The definition of eligible organisations in each Programme Country will be defined by the competent National Authority and published on the website of the relevant National Agency together with relevant examples.
  • 3. Including early childhood education and care
  • 4. For example, if a person from Madrid (Spain) is taking part in an activity taking place in Rome (Italy), the applicant will  calculate the distance from Madrid to Rome (1365,28 KM) and then select the applicable travel distance band (i.e. between 500 and 1999 km).
  • 5. http://ec.europa.eu/programmes/erasmus-plus/tools/distance_en.htm
  • 6. In case of accompanying persons, the rates for staff apply. In exceptional cases, where the accompanying person needs to stay abroad for more than 60 days, extra subsistence costs beyond the 60th day will be supported under the budget heading "Inclusion support".
  • 7.

    Receiving country groups:
    Country group 1: Norway, Denmark, Luxembourg, Iceland, Sweden, Ireland, Finland, Liechtenstein;
    Country group 2: Netherlands, Austria, Belgium, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Cyprus, Greece, Malta, Portugal;
    Country group 3: Slovenia, Estonia, Latvia, Croatia, Slovakia, Czech Republic, Lithuania, Turkey, Hungary, Poland, Romania, Bulgaria, the Republic of North Macedonia, Serbia