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Learning Opportunity: Equine Science, B.Sc

Equine Science, B.Sc

Course Information

Knowledge, ability and skills
At the conclusion of the program, the student can demonstrate knowledge, skills and ability as stated below:
Knowledge and Understanding:

Students possess a general understanding of theories, criteria, concepts and methods within a specific subject. Students can apply their knowledge and understanding to their theoretical practice, or within their profession, and have competences to sustain theoretical and practical solutions in the relevant subject. On completing their studies from the Equine Science Programme the students should have acquired knowledge and understanding on: A1. The main laws and processes in chemistry and mathematics that are related to natural sciences. 01.34.02 Mathematics; 01.20.03 General Chemistry; 02.26.02 Organic Chemistry; 02.06.04. A2. Fundamentals of living systems and general laws and theories on the growth and development of organisms and their biochemical processes. 02.29.03 Biochemistry; 03.26.03 Genetics; 01.30.02 04.59.02 Cell Biology; 02.02.02 Botany. A3. General understanding of business studies and management of small firms. 01.42.03 Introduction to Business Finance; 05.34.02 Resource and Environmental Economics. A4. Suitability for agricultural practice in the northern environment with respect to animal husbandry and grassland use. The history of horse farming in Iceland and the state of horse breeding and management in present day agriculture. 01.10.03 Man and Nature; 05.75.03 Grazing Ecology and Management; 05.40.02 Plant Production. A5. Obtaining information in the field of natural and agricultural science and applying this for independent projects, such as making information packages. 01.10.03 Man and Nature; literature search in various courses. A6. Analysing and interpreting numerical data, results and scientific information (tables, graphs, equations, statistical tests) in the fields of agricultural science and the management of small enterprises. 01.10.03 Man and Nature; 02.33.02 Statistics I; 03.39.04 Statistics II; 01.42.03 Introduction to Business Finance; 06.51.03 Entrepreneurship. A7. Ability to use statistical methods for the analysis and interpretation of results from experiments and surveys. 02.33.02 Statistics I; 03.39.04 Statistics II. A8. Planning and execution of a small research project or survey using scientific methods and writing up a report/essay/paper. 06.10.05 Final Assignment A9. Ability to combine knowledge from various courses and fields of study and use for further study and for practical applications. Various courses, mainly in Yr 2 and 3; 06.10.05 Final Assignment. A10. Ability to accumulate and combine multi-disciplinary information, both of local and international origin, and put it into the context of the present State of the Art and the intended use. Various courses, mainly in Yr 2 and 3; 06.10.05 Final Assignment. Learning methods: Lectures with the aid of computer technology (Power-Point) are the principal method of delivery of knowledge and understanding skills for most courses in Equine Science (A1-A4). Most courses rely on textbooks and reviews and research papers are used as supplementary material, especially in Yr 2 and 3. In subjects specially related to Icelandic agricultural conditions and the Icelandic horse teaching relies on scientific material published in local journals and reports. The communication between teachers and students is organised on special web pages for each course, where material related to lectures, projects and further reading is easily accessible for all students enrolled in the course. Practicals under the supervision of teachers are used in many subjects, especially in the basic courses in Yr 1 and 2, where students acquire knowledge on methods used in the particular field of study, in the laboratory, farm stables and field (A1-A7). Short field trips are in many courses (01.10.03 Man and Nature; 05.75.03 Grazing Ecology and Management; 03.39.04 Statistics II) and summer field courses (02.12.01 Field Course: Botany) give an opportunity for demonstration and training of practical skills on site (A1-A4). Student projects form a part of almost all courses in the Programme where methods and the understanding of the particular subject is trained. The projects are either carried out by small groups of students or by individuals with increased demand for autonomy as the Programme advances. The result is given in a written form as a short report or presented orally in class (A5-A10). A Final Assignment in Yr3 trains the student to work in an autonomous manner to carry out a literature survey, gather data, analyse it and present it in an orderly manner (A5-A10). See also Course Descriptions in Appendix. Assessment methods: Unseen written exams (2-3 hours) are the principal method of assessment for knowledge and understanding in most courses in the Equine Science Programme. Outcome of the written exam counts most commonly for 50 – 80 % of the final mark and the outcome from practicals and projects makes up the remainder. The Final Assignment is assessed solely from the written report.

Type of Knowledge:

Students have adopted extensive knowledge and understanding in one or more specialised areas within their subject. The scope of the knowledge shall cover the most recent findings in the subject. On completing their studies from the Equine Science Programme the students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding on: B1. Mathematics, statistics and chemistry directly related to applied natural sciences and agricultural science. Firm, basic knowledge in chemistry and statistics is emphasised. 01.34.02 Mathematics; 02.33.02 Statistics I; 03.39.04 Statistics II; 01.30.02 General Chemistry; 02.26.02 Organic Chemistry. B2. The structure and function of organisms, including key biological processes at the molecular and population level. 02.29.03 Biochemistry; 03.26.03 Genetics; 04.59.02 Cell Biology; 02.02.02 Botany; 02.12.01 Field Course: Botany; 04.41.04 Anatomy and Physiology of Domestic Animals I; 06.56.02 Structure and Movement of the Horse, 05.58.02 Reproductive Physiology of the Horse B3. Interaction between man and nature with respect to land use and management of fodder production. 01.10.03 Man and Nature; 05.75.03 Grazing Ecology and Management; 04.21.02 Fertilisers and Fertilisation; 05.40.02 Plant Production; 04.46.03 Fodder conservation. B4. Basic skills in economics and business management with respect to small enterprises. 01.42.03 Introduction to Business Finance; 06.51.03 Entrepreneurship. B5. Scientific and applied preconditions for plant production in the Icelandic environment, with emphasis on producing sufficient high quality fodder for livestock. 04.21.02 Fertilisers and Fertilisation; 05.40.02 Plant Production; 04.46.03 Fodder conservation; 04.42.03 Animal Nutrition; 05.59.02 Horse Nutrition B6. Body function of mammals with special emphasis on horses. Nutrition and horse husbandry aiming at development, training and general welfare. 04.41.04 Anatomy and Physiology of Domestic Animals I; 04.42.03 Animal Nutrition; 06.45.02 Farm Buildings; 05.75.03 Grazing Ecology and Management; 05.59.02 Horse Nutrition; 05.57.02 Horse Exercise Physiology, 06.56.02 Structure and Movement of the Horse, 05.55.02 Management and Health of the Horse B7. Genetics and breeding of livestock with special emphasis on the Icelandic horse. Judgement of horses and horse breeding. 03.26.03 Genetics; 05.43.03 Animal Breeding; 05.58.02 Reproductive Physiology of the Horse, 04.55.02 Horse Breeding; 06.57.02 Judging Breeding Horses. B8. Conditions, management and health of the horse, both indoors and out in the field, with respect to use and general welfare. 06.45.02 Farm Buildings; 05.54.02 Hoof care and Shoeing; 06.55.01 Management and Feeding of the Horse; 05.55.02 Management and Health of the Horse; 05.56.03 Behaviour and Training of the Horse. B9. Basic skills in horse training and riding the Icelandic horse with an emphasis on the interaction between man and horse, an understanding of horse behaviour and the construction of correct training. 05.56.03 Behaviour and Training of the Horse; 02.51.02 Riding I, 05.52.04 Riding II, 06.54.04 Riding III. Learning methods: Formal lectures (B1-B9). See further in: A. Knowledge and understanding. Practical exercises can be found in the teaching of all skills (B1-B9) and direct practical teaching and training is an important component of knowledge and understanding in the specialty subjects on the horse (B6-B9). Field trips (B3). Course work assignments and small projects (B1-B9). See further in: A. Knowledge and understanding. See also Course Descriptions in Appendix A8.6 Assessment methods: Written exams and project work are the principal methods for assessment of specific knowledge within the Programme. Practical exams and teacher grade are also used for assessment in certain horse related subjects such as 02.51.02 Riding I, 05.52.04 Riding II, 06.54.04 Riding III, 06.55.01 Management and Feeding of the Horse; 05.55.02 Management and Health of the Horse; 06.57.02 Judging Breeding Horses.

Practical Skills:

Students can analyse practical, complex subjects in a professional context and are able to justify decision on a professional basis. Students can work in an autonomous and organised manner on subjects. Students can set goals for their work, devise a work schedule and follow it through. Students are capable of acquiring further knowledge and maintain their knowledge in their field of study. On completing their studies from the Equine Science Programme the students should have acquired practical knowledge and understanding on: C1. History and development of horse husbandry and horse riding in Iceland. 02.50.02 History of the Horse. C2 Conditions and management of farm animals and anim

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LBHI