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Issue 570, 27/10/2021

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Increasing levels of toxic metals in coastal sediments highlight the need — in the context of the developing blue economy — to address hidden sources of these contaminants

Regulation and improved waste treatment have reduced marine pollution; however, some contaminants persist in coastal sediments. An analysis of data on UK sediments has shown that concentrations of some, including copper and nickel, are rising. Identifying the hidden sources, such as shipping, say the researchers, is critical for maintaining healthy seas, which underpin a growing blue economy. Click here to read more

Increasing levels of toxic metals in coastal sediments highlight the need — in the context of the developing blue economy — to address hidden sources of these contaminants
Regionally and culturally adapted approaches to landscape stewardship could benefit European rural landscapes

Rural landscape stewardship must be an inclusive societal process based on collaborative governance. This study conducted horizon scanning to identify current knowledge and trends regarding the factors that can underpin this. To meet the need of establishing or enhancing the functionality of green infrastructures, the integrated analysis of 16 pan-European case study landscapes provides insights on current trends, challenges and opportunities for strengthening social capital among rural landscape stakeholders. It emphasises a need for more regionally and culturally adapted approaches to landscape stewardship in Europe. Click here to read more

Regionally and culturally adapted approaches to landscape stewardship could benefit European rural landscapes
To aid water-management policy, long-term drought risk modelling must couple detail with fast computation

The effects of climate change and other factors such as changes in water use on future droughts are uncertain. However, policymakers must conceive long-term strategies to mitigate the risk of water shortages. Integrated assessment models that simulate possible scenarios can support decision making. Yet, these models suffer a trade-off between timeliness and detailed output. Referring to the Netherlands' National Water Model, researchers have described this dilemma, along with suggestions for solving the problem. Click here to read more

To aid water-management policy, long-term drought risk modelling must couple detail with fast computation
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Science for Environment Policy is published by the European Commission's DG Environment and edited by the Science Communication Unit (SCU), at the University of the West of England, Bristol. This service is provided by Ecorys.

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