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Environmental Information Services

Environmental Information Services

Extreme coastal water levels will increase considerably due to climate change, posing an increasing threat of coastal floods due to ‘overtopping’ — a cause of flooding

Climate change and anthropogenic pressures are widely expected to exacerbate hazards such as coastal flooding. One process that could contribute to this is overtopping which occurs when the extreme coastal water level exceeds the maximum elevation of the coastal system (such as dunes, dykes or cliffs). A new global analysis — using satellite-derived models of coastlines — estimates that under a high emissions scenario, the incidence of overtopping, globally, will accelerate faster than the global mean sea-level.<a href="https://ec.europa.eu/environment/integration/research/newsalert/pdf/569na6_en-1342_a-global-analysis-of-extreme-coastal-water-levels.pdf">Click here to read more</a>

 
Ecosystem restoration goals: study highlights need for global priority areas and collective effort

Restoring global ecosystems is an urgent priority in efforts to conserve biodiversity and stabilise our planet’s climate. However, the costs and outcomes of ecosystem restoration differ markedly by location and habitat type. A recent study has developed a multi-criteria cost-benefit approach to identify priority areas for optimal restoration of terrestrial cropland and pastureland back to natural ecosystems, considering the outcomes of biodiversity conservation, climate mitigation and cost minimisation. </br> </br> <b><a href="https://ec.europa.eu/environment/integration/research/newsalert/pdf/557na2_en_ecosystem-restoration-goals-study-highlights-need-for-global-priority-areas-and-collective-effort.pdf">Click here to read more</a>