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Issue 543, 2 June 2020

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In this issue
Visualising climate change effects on global cities: by 2050 Madrid’s climate may be like Marrakech’s

Tackling climate change requires global behaviour change across all sectors of society. Many people, however, struggle to visualise how climate change will impact daily life — something that is key to motivating them to change their behaviour and demand urgent measures from governments and businesses. This new study illustrates how the climate of iconic cities will change in just 30 years by pairing them with other well-known cities that currently have their future climate.

Visualising climate change effects on global cities: by 2050 Madrid’s climate may be like Marrakech’s
Documents
Document Visualising climate change effects on global cities: by 2050 Madrid’s climate may be like Marrakech’s  (949 Kb)
Disturbing mountain forests reduces their protective effect against natural hazards

Human settlements exist in many mountainous areas of the world, and related infrastructure is highly exposed to natural hazards such as debris flow and flooding. Mountain forests play a central role in balancing the environment and minimising the risk of such hazards, but this protection is being threatened as canopies are increasingly disturbed (by events both natural, such as beetle outbreaks and trees being uprooted by wind, and anthropogenic, such as forest management). This study sought to quantify the effects of forest cover and disturbance on torrential hazards in the Eastern Alps.

Disturbing mountain forests reduces their protective effect against natural hazards
Documents
Document Disturbing mountain forests reduces their protective effect against natural hazards  (1,0 Mb)
Promoting health with people-centred city design: the ‘Barcelona Superblock’ model

Car-centred urban planning has resulted in high levels of pollution, sedentary lifestyles and in-creased vulnerability to the effects of climate change. The superblock model is an urban and transport planning strategy that reclaims public space for people, reduces motorised transport, promotes active lifestyles, provides urban greening and mitigates the effects of climate change. A study now estimates the health impacts of applying this model across Barcelona.

Promoting health with people-centred city design: the ‘Barcelona Superblock’ model
Documents
Document Promoting health with people-centred city design: the ‘Barcelona Superblock’ model  (1,0 Mb)
Energy policy must consider water footprint of energy sector, suggests EU study

Energy security in the EU is a priority of the European Commission (EC). However, at present, energy-related policies do not account for the use of water as a resource — and water is becoming increasingly scarce as a result of human activity. This study1 provides a detailed assessment of the water footprint (WF) of the energy sector in the EU and could be valuable in informing future policy to protect against water scarcity, stress and insecurity.

Energy policy must consider water footprint of energy sector, suggests EU study
Documents
Document Energy policy must consider water footprint of energy sector, suggests EU study  (547 Kb)
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Science for Environment Policy is published by the European Commission's DG Environment and edited by the Science Communication Unit (SCU), at the University of the West of England, Bristol. This service is provided by Ecorys.

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