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Minority communities in the time of COVID and protests - A study of BAME opinion

The HOPE Not Hate Charitable Trust published a survey on BAME (black, Asian and minority ethnic) opinion looking at a range of social issues, including the Black Lives Matter (BLM) anti-racism protests, historical racism in the UK, the COVID-19 pandemic, inter-community relations and more.

The survey found that:

  • Racism continues to shape the experiences of minority ethnic people in Britain, with 72 percent of respondents agreeing they face discrimination in their everyday life; different groups and generations however have different experiences, thus also seeing the issues and solutions differently; 
  • 73 percent in total express their support for the BLM movement, with many respondents hopeful that the BLM protests will help see change in British society;
  • There is a generation gap in perceptions of racism: older people tend to be more concerned with the far-right, while younger people are more politicised and more likely to see racism as a systemic issue;
  • Those born outside the UK, although just as likely to have experienced racism, are less likely to see it as a systematic issue or be critical of the government’s response to the impact of coronavirus on BAME communities;
  • There is political consensus on key issues among BAME voters;
  • Yet, fewer than a third of respondents feel politically represented, with the majority seeing themselves as alienated from the political system;
  • There is widespread anger for the way the government has handled the COVID-19 which has disproportionately impacted BAME people;
  • 72 percent agree that the impact of COVID-19 and lockdown has reinforced racial disparities;
  • Religion plays a major role in the lives of many BAME people;
  • Anti-Muslim prejudice shapes experiences and perceptions 

Carried out in the period 3 - 10 July 2020, the survey included 1,001 BAME adults sampled from across the UK, with quotas applied on ethnicities to ensure representation. The full report is available here.

Authors:
Rosie Carter
Posted by:
Country Coordinator United Kingdom