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Social Hackers Academy (SHA), a non-profit organisation, is the first coding school for vulnerable groups in Athens, Greece. The school’s mission is to help educate, integrate and find work for refugees and other vulnerable groups in the labour market. They achieve these goals by teaching…
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This forthcoming Horizon 2020 call for proposals will support a coordination and support action (CSA) to assess the types of practices addressing the integration challenges stemming from the migratory crisis in Europe, considering the numerous policy and research tools, instruments and actions funded. The projects will provide best practices and lessons that serve as policy recommendations from which EU, national, regional and local governments can draw. Projects will also develop an online platform to provide European visibility.

Scope

The project’s work should have a focus on improving the governance of migrant integration, measuring the impact of actions and delivering innovation to support improved outcomes for migrants and communities. The collection of new knowledge and innovative practices should include gender-related aspects.

Proposals should develop participatory techniques to extract policy implications from research findings, particularly from past migration-related Horizon 2020 projects. Strong cooperation with the consortia involved in the actions under the call MIGRATION-04 is essential to integrate the outputs of this forward-looking CSA. Other elements of the proposals should include:

  • Strategies for dissemination to relevant stakeholders in view of exploitation of results
  • An interactive online repository providing for customised searches and reports
  • Public engagement to increase awareness of the added value of European research and innovation activities on migration

The Commission considers that proposals requesting in the order of EUR 2 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately, though selected proposals may request other amounts.

Expected impact

This CSA will establish a solid and readily accessible evidence base in support of migration and integration policies and will contribute to improved practices, policies and strategies at local, national and EU levels. It will advance the implementation of the EU Urban Agenda and of the UN Sustainable Development Goals dedicated to making cities and rural communities inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable. Furthermore, the action may contribute to the deployment of migration-related innovations by highlighting the most effective actions over the past years. Finally, this CSA will improve the flow of knowledge between researchers, practitioners and policymakers across Europe.

The planned opening date for this call is 5 November 2019 and the deadline will be 12 March 2020 at 17:00 Brussels time. More information about this call, including eligibility and other conditions, can be found on the European Commission’s funding and tender opportunities website.


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All residents of Ireland, regardless of their nationality or type of immigration status, can not only vote in local elections but also run for local office. However, there is a huge gap between these rights and the degree to which they are realised.

Before the 2019 local elections, only 3 out of 949 elected local Councillors had a migrant background. Voter registration rates are low among the migrant population, with only between 33 and 50 per cent of eligible migrants registered to vote in the various local authorities in Ireland.

Political parties

While migrants’ involvement in local elections is steadily growing, participation is still significantly less than proportionate.  Civil society and academics have pointed out that political parties make little effort to attract immigrant candidates. During the 2019 local elections, out of 53 (non-UK) migrant candidates for office, only half were running as party members. Furthermore, as seen in the political manifestos for the 2019 European Parliament elections, political parties do not put issues related to migration and integration high on their agendas. 

Awareness of voting rights

Another reason for migrants’ low political participation is lack of awareness about voting rights. Different campaigns have used a variety of formats to increase understanding of these rights. For example, the Go Vote! campaign produced 10 multilingual videos that were disseminated through a targeted social media drive.

During the year running up to the 2019 local elections, the Immigrant Council of Ireland, through its Integration Hub, organised 27 voter registration workshops that attracted more than 450 people. In addition, a coalition of migrant organisations delivered the Migrant Mobilisation Conference to increase engagement between the migrant community and those already involved in the political system.

Migrant candidates

In the 2019 local elections, there were 53 candidates with migrant backgrounds—a record number—which attracted significant media interest. The media not only profiled many candidates, but also made scrutinising reports on some high-profile candidates that were considered to go beyond the typical practice for non-migrant candidates. Many migrant candidates also reported instances of racist attitudes online and from members of the public. Nine of the migrant candidates were elected as Councillors, all of whom were party nominees, giving a clear indication that party support is essential for winning the elections.

Ireland has one member of parliament who is a migrant, Katherine Zappone—an American and naturalised Irish citizen who is a member of the lower house (Dáil Éireann) and serves as the Minister for Children and Youth Affairs. So far there is no migrant senator, despite earlier calls by a diversity support group for the Prime Minister to nominate a migrant to the Irish Senate.


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This forthcoming Horizon 2020 funding call will provide support for projects that address the dynamics and developments of migration narratives at the local, national and EU level. The collective discussion on migration has an impact on the policies and responses that address this phenomenon. The challenge is to understand and explain the causes and consequences of migration narratives, examining their construction and assessing their effects on attitudes to migration and on society at large.

Scope

Projects should examine the long-term societal impact and ethical implications of narratives on policymaking. Successful projects will study historical perspectives and changes in attitudes of non-migrant populations towards migrants and vice versa. Projects should also analyse the extent to which migrants’ voices are included in the shaping of these narratives.

The Commission considers that proposals requesting EUR 3 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately, though selected proposals may request other amounts.

Expected impact

Practitioners will be informed by new knowledge on the consequences of discourses on migration, which may have an impact on their conduct and policy choices. Projects will improve access and dissemination of information on (the effects of) narratives of migration, including scale, patterns and the social and economic impact on host societies. This will contribute to a more informed debate on migration and public perceptions. In the longer term, projects may help change the migration debate in European societies, opening new opportunities for successful integration of migrants.

The planned opening date for this call is 5 November 2019 and the deadline will be 12 March 2020 at 17:00 Brussels time. More information about this call, including eligibility and other conditions, can be found on the European Commission’s funding and tender opportunities website.


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Education systems face multiple challenges due to growing cultural, linguistic and ethnic diversity and to socio-economic inequalities. This forthcoming Horizon 2020 funding call seeks to implement pilot actions for formal, informal and non-formal education solutions to address the integration challenges of children from recent migration cohorts, in particular children of refugees and asylum seekers and unaccompanied minors, including those residing in hotspots and reception centres.

Scope

The proposals should include actions with local schools, teaching programmes and organisations working with children (with or without migration backgrounds) and focus not only on formal educational settings but also on informal social and learning environments. Proposals should address at least three of the following dimensions:

  • Governance and funding of education institutions
  • Funding of integration actions targeting children
  • Roles and attitudes of families
  • Gender aspects
  • Communities
  • Civil society organisations and local service providers
  • Preparedness of schools and teaching staff
  • Practices for language learning and use of native languages alongside the language used at school

Proposals should develop and implement actions which can be adapted, rescaled and reproduced in different environments according to local/regional needs and involve stakeholders from public administrations, civil society, migrants and the host community from an early stage.

The Commission considers that proposals requesting EUR 3 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately, though selected proposals may request other amounts.

Expected impact

The actions will inform policymakers, families, teachers and other stakeholders on effective practices for integrating migrant children in schools and society, as well as practices for developing more inclusive schools. Projects will enhance synergies and cooperation amongst these actors for the uptake of innovative practices, monitoring and data collection and the identification of research gaps.

The planned opening date for this call is 5 November 2019 and the deadline will be 12 March 2020 at 17:00 Brussels time. More information about this call, including eligibility and other conditions, can be found on the European Commission’s funding and tender opportunities website.


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