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Publication Year: 
2017
JRC Publication N°: 
JRC106251
Authors: 
TARCHI Dario
GUGLIERI Giorgio
VESPE Michele
GIOIA Ciro
SERMI Francesco
KYOVTOROV Vladimir
Publication Year: 
2017
JRC Publication N°: 
JRC106256
Authors: 
GIOIA Ciro
SERMI Francesco
TARCHI Dario
VESPE Michele
KYOVTOROV Vladimir
Publication Year: 
2017
JRC Publication N°: 
JRC106740
Authors: 
NECCI Amos
PONTE Luca
KRAUSMANN Elisabeth
VAMANU Bogdan
Publication Year: 
2017
JRC Publication N°: 
JRC105031
Authors: 
VASILAKOPOULOS Paraskevas
RAITSOS Dionysios E.
TZANATOS Evangelos
MARAVELIAS Christos
Eutrophication is caused by high nutrient concentrations that stimulate algal blooms of algae, which can deprive aquatic ecosystems of much needed oxygen
©Fotolia, Author: Alexey Stiop
Oct 13 2017

Eutrophication and its detrimental effects on coastal ecosystems is one of the biggest issues in many regions of the world. Human activities and climatic change are the most important drivers of eutrophication, leading to harmful algal blooms and the proliferation of hypoxic conditions in many coastal ecosystems.

Publication Year: 
2017
JRC Publication N°: 
JRC106532
Authors: 
CITORES Leire
IBAIBARRIAGA L.
GAMITO JARDIM José Ernesto
Publication Year: 
2016
JRC Publication N°: 
JRC102746
Authors: 
PERKOVIC Marko
HARSCH Rick
FERRARO DI SILVI E CASTIGLIONE Guido
The EU fishing fleet registered record-high net profits of EUR 798 million in 2015 The EU fishing fleet registered record-high net profits of EUR 798 million in 2015
©Fotolia, Bruno Barracuda
Sep 29 2017

According to the latest Annual Economic Report, the overall economic performance of the EU fleet improved again in 2015.

While still marginally profitable in 2009, the EU fleet registered record-high net profits of EUR 798 million in 2015, and estimates for 2016 and 2017 point towards further profitability gains. However, the report also confirms that economic performance stagnates where fleets depend on stocks which are still subject to overfishing or overexploitation.

Tuna schools tend to aggregate in hotspots of marine productivity that are detected from space. Tuna schools tend to aggregate in hotspots of marine productivity that are detected from space.
©Fotolia, author: Richard Carey
Oct 10 2017

In a new publication in Frontiers in Marine Sciences, a group of international scientists, led by the Joint Research Centre (JRC), developed habitat predictions for skipjack tuna feeding.

Those predictions can help monitor the dynamics of the population and guide the fisheries deployment and intensity.

Skipjack tuna currently accounts for about 60% of the annual global tuna catch, making it the third most fished species globally (FAO, 2014).

The rapidly developing field of genomics can be used to help sustainably manage seafood resources
©EU - adapted from Fotolia, author: R. Carey
Sep 08 2017

With the human population continuing to grow and the developing world gaining in prosperity, the global demand for food will rise. New food resources must therefore be explored, along with strategies that enable the sustainable exploitation of such resources.

The oceans and seas harbour a huge potential to contribute to global food security through fisheries and aquaculture. The exploitation of marine natural resources also provides opportunities for jobs and income.

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