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Science updates

Tuna schools tend to aggregate in hotspots of marine productivity that are detected from space.
Oct 10 2017

In a new publication in Frontiers in Marine Sciences, a group of international scientists, led by the Joint Research Centre (JRC), developed habitat predictions for skipjack tuna feeding.

Those predictions can help monitor the dynamics of the population and guide the fisheries deployment and intensity.

Skipjack tuna currently accounts for about 60% of the annual global tuna catch, making it the third most fished species globally (FAO, 2014).

Ocean colour data can help track fish feeding hotspots and inform sustainable fisheries
Apr 01 2019

A JRC-led study published in Nature Scientific Reports describes a first satellite-based indicator of food available to fish, revealing a close link between ocean productivity fronts and zooplankton biomass.

The proposed indicator describes the daily distribution of suitable feeding habitat of mesozooplankton, the medium-sized class of zooplankton. Since mesozooplankton are essential for the feeding of marine food chains, this new monitoring indicator provides critical information for research and policy, and particularly with regard to sustainable fishing.