EU Science Hub

Science updates

Tuna schools tend to aggregate in hotspots of marine productivity that are detected from space.
Oct 10 2017

In a new publication in Frontiers in Marine Sciences, a group of international scientists, led by the Joint Research Centre (JRC), developed habitat predictions for skipjack tuna feeding.

Those predictions can help monitor the dynamics of the population and guide the fisheries deployment and intensity.

Skipjack tuna currently accounts for about 60% of the annual global tuna catch, making it the third most fished species globally (FAO, 2014).

Sep 08 2017

With the human population continuing to grow and the developing world gaining in prosperity, the global demand for food will rise. New food resources must therefore be explored, along with strategies that enable the sustainable exploitation of such resources.

The oceans and seas harbour a huge potential to contribute to global food security through fisheries and aquaculture. The exploitation of marine natural resources also provides opportunities for jobs and income.

Jun 13 2017

The JRC has recently published a technical report that illustrates the flows of biomass for each sector of the EU bioeconomy, using the Sankey biomass diagram.

Focusing on the dry matter content of biomass, it splits biomass supply into the traditional sectors of agriculture (represented in green), forestry (brown) and fisheries (blue), and biomass uses made into the various categories for which it is used.

Jan 24 2017

A JRC-DG MARE report has just been published,  showing that the performance of the EU fishing fleet has significantly improved in recent years, moving from a loss-making position in 2008 to record-high net profits of €770 million in 2014 – up from €500 million in 2013. Forecasts for 2016 remain positive.