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JRC survey on stakeholders' requirements for micro(nano)plastic test materials in research

Optical microscopic image of micro-plastic particles with FT-IR chemical mapping overlay
Optical microscopic image of micro-plastic particles with FT-IR chemical mapping overlay
Dec 18 2020

The JRC has launched an online survey to collect information about stakeholders’ needs regarding suitable test materials for micro(nano)plastics research. The survey addresses all kind of stakeholders, such as scientists, research and monitoring laboratories as well as regulators.

The JRC invites stakeholders from the research community to share their experiences and requirements relating to microplastic test materials. The survey seeks to determine what items should be included in a possible repository of micro- (and potentially nano-) plastic test materials. It also explores the experiences with the procurement and use of such materials in the past. Furthermore, the survey aims to assess the stakeholders’ interest in the sourcing microplastic materials from a common repository.

The survey is part of a wider feasibility study about the possible development of a microplastic particles repository by the JRC. It addresses scientists who have previously conducted experimental research involving microplastics, or may be interested in doing so in the future. The input of other stakeholders, such as monitoring laboratories or regulators, is likewise welcome.

You have experience in the field? Please participate in this survey! It will take you about 10-15 minutes.

The survey will remain open until 15 January 2021 and can be accessed here

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Background

In micro(nano)plastics research, it is often challenging to compare the data generated in different studies. This is due to not only a lack of harmonisation of analytical methods, but also the use of diverse and less relevant test materials.

In order to help to mitigate these limitations of microplastics research, the JRC would like to consult with various stakeholders on the usefulness of a repository of microplastic test materials. A common source of such materials is expected to increase the comparability of study data. Furthermore, a repository may help to make microplastic test materials more accessible to the scientific community and more relevant to the research questions, particularly in forms or sizes that are otherwise difficult to obtain.