JRC research topics

The JRC carries out research in a wide variety of fields. Located across five sites throughout the EU, seven research institutes work in the areas of agriculture and food security, energy and transport, environment and climate change, health and consumer protection, information society, safety and security, innovation and growth, measurements and standards, and nuclear safety and security.

  1. The JRC carries out policy analysis and develops economic modelling tools in support to the EU's Common Agricultural Policy.


    Science Areas: Agriculture and food security
    Keywords: agriculture, policy
  2. The JRC is providing dedicated support to the EU’s goals of improving the economic and monetary union’s fiscal governance while fostering more sustainable levels of growth and employment. In this context the JRC provides expertise in modelling and development of models, assessing impacts of policy changes and macroeconomic analysis.


    Science Areas: Economic and Monetary Union
    Keywords: financial
  3. The JRC expertise in modelling supports Commission services dealing with financial markets regulation, competition and taxation policies. The SYMBOL model (Systemic Model of Banking Originated Losses), developed by the JRC contributes to evaluating the impacts of proposed legislation on banking regulation.


    Science Areas: Economic and Monetary Union
    Keywords: financial
  4. The JRC supports European authorities in monitoring forest fires through an integrated information system that helps to predict and forecast fires and provide post-fire monitoring and evaluation of soil, gas emissions and vegetation.


    Science Areas: Environment and climate change
    Keywords: hazard, fire
  5. Our seas, oceans and coasts are important resources for the EU. The livelihoods of many citizens depend on the sea – fisheries of course, but also tourism and trade are key sectors of the EU economy. The EU fishing industry is the fourth largest in the world, providing some 6.4 million tonnes of fish each year and jobs for more than 350,000 people.

    Marine resources must, therefore, be used in a responsible way if we want to maintain the fragile balance of marine ecosystems and in turn protect and develop sea-related human activities.


    Science Areas: Agriculture and food security
    Keywords: fish, sea
  6. The JRC’s expertise on flood prediction and management helps to improve preparedness and response during flood events. This includes the coordination of flood forecasting systems and modelling of hydrological processes.


    Science Areas: Environment and climate change
    Keywords: hazard, flood
  7. The JRC actions in this area are in line with the "farm to table" concept which takes into account consumers' demands and their feedback right along the food chain.


    Science Areas: Health and consumer protection
    Keywords: food/feed, safety
  8. The labeling of food products is essential to inform consumers what kind of products they are buying. EU harmonised rules on food labeling, presentation and advertising aim to protect consumers and facilitate trade inside and outside Europe.

    Recently an initiative of the European Parliament (EP) has identified a number of foods such as: olive oil, fish, honey, dairy products and meat as being the target of fraudulent activities. This initiative calls for the development of technologies and methods to detect food fraud.


    Science Areas: Health and consumer protection
    Keywords: food/feed, quality
  9. What are food contact materials?

    Food contact materials comprise all materials and articles that come or are intended to come in contact with food, e.g. food packaging materials, kitchen utensils, tableware and food processing equipment. They can be made of different materials such as plastics, rubber, silicones, metals, ceramics, glass, paper and board, wood, cork, textiles, adhesives, coatings and printing inks.


    Science Areas: Health and consumer protection
    Keywords: food/feed, consumer
  10. Discontinued activity

    The 'Chocolate Directive' allows the addition of up to 5 % of vegetable fats other than cocoa butter, the so-called cocoa butter equivalents (CBEs), in chocolate. If CBEs are added, consumers have to be informed by appropriate labelling. EU member states' laws, regulations and administrative provisions have had to comply with the Chocolate Directive since August 2003.


    Science Areas: Health and consumer protection
    Keywords: food/feed, quality