JRC research topics

The JRC carries out research in a wide variety of fields. Located across five sites throughout the EU, our scientists work in the areas of agriculture and food security, energy and transport, environment and climate change, health and consumer protection, information society, safety and security, innovation and growth, measurements and standards, and nuclear safety and security.

  1. Understanding how people interact with digital technology is relevant to EU policy for a number of reasons. For one, the  digital consumer and citizen needs to be protected, from malicious advertising, on-line tracking, companies tricking them into revealing more about their personal information than they would like, etc. Secondly, insights about online behaviour lead to better provision of digital public services (e.g. eHealth, eLearning and eGovernment).


    Science Areas: Information Society
    Keywords: ICT, citizen
  2. The JRC investigates how emerging technologies and digital trends affect the user’s safety and security in order to help forecast and tackle potential misuse of citizens’ digital information.


    Science Areas: Information Society
    Keywords: ICT, citizen
  3. Cybersecurity research at the JRC provides support to the EU to respond to cyber-attacks and reinforce rules on personal data protection, as well as to ensure that critical networked systems are sufficiently secure and resilient.


    Science Areas: Information Society, Safety and Security
    Keywords: ICT, security
  4. Digital Earth is a concept of an interactive digital replica of the entire planet that can facilitate a shared understanding of the multiple relationships between the physical and natural environments and society. To do so, it needs to be accessible globally from multiple platforms (mobiles, tablets, computers); be able to display information in ways that are easily understood by multiple audiences (the public, decision-makers, scientists); and be constantly updated with data coming from sensors (space-based, airborne, in-situ), citizens, and both public and private sectors.


    Science Areas: Environment and climate change, Information Society
    Keywords: geo-reference, reference data
  5. The rapid decline in computing costs, the emergence of the Internet as a communication tool and the proliferation of day-to-day applications have profoundly affected the organisation of businesses and of personal life. Consequently, it has also affected greatly the functioning of the economy.

    It has brought many benefits to consumers and businesses, but it has also generated new problems and policy issues. Policy makers struggle to respond to these new challenges.


    Science Areas: Information Society
    Keywords: ICT, industry
  6. Based on their enabling characteristics, Information Communication Technologies (ICTs) permit all sectors in society to influence the way we live, work and behave. With citizens becoming active participants in the European Knowledge Society and thus being able to consume and produce digital content, the market for content needs to become open to innovation and new actors.


    Science Areas: Information Society
    Keywords: ICT, citizen
  7. Online services trade in the EU Digital Single Market

    The creation of a borderless Single Market for trade in goods, services, capital and labour has been a major objective ever since the start of the EU. This objective has been extended to online markets and the achievement of a borderless Digital Single Market has become a policy priority for the current European Commission.


    Science Areas: Information Society
    Keywords: ICT, market
  8. The JRC supports the aim of building European confidence in the Digital Society by ensuring it is both ethically balanced and by highlighting the potential security aspects associated with it.


    Science Areas: Information Society
    Keywords: ICT, citizen
  9. Governance, Public sector Innovation and Social Change (GISC) research area is focusing on investigating the socio-economic impact of Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) that contribute to address fundamental societal challenges, such as


    Science Areas: Information Society
    Keywords: ICT, citizen
  10. ICT-related innovation represents between 17% and 26% of total innovative output in the EU. With its annual R&D expenditure of €27 Bn (2009), the ICT industry represents 17% of total European Business Expenditure in Research and Development (BERD). The Digital Agenda for Europe aims to double both business expenditures in R&D in the ICT economic sector (ICT BERD), and public funding of ICT R&D, from 2007 to 2020.


    Science Areas: Information Society
    Keywords: ICT, market, industry