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Digital living

Based on their enabling characteristics, ICTs permit all sectors in society to influence the way we live, work and behave. With citizens becoming active participants in the European Knowledge Society and thus being able to consume and produce digital content, the market for content needs to become open to innovation and new actors.

The Europe 2020 Strategy defines the key enabling role that the use of ICTs must play if Europe is to succeed in its ambitions for 2020. It aims to support citizens, boost confidence in ICTs and improve Europe's competitiveness. To this end, JRC focuses in several areas of the Digital Agenda for Europe.  

Digital Identity

Digital Identity is a vital ingredient of this digital content market and there is a clear need for technically efficient, fail-safe and interoperable solutions. In addition, new challenges for identity, such as those posed by the wider adoption of Ambient Intelligence, may require a regulatory framework as a means of ensuring participation in tomorrow's Digital Life. 

Several types of technologies such as Identity-related technologies, location-based technologies, profiling technologies but also search engine technologies influence the way we live, work and behave. Identity-related technologies enable new ways of defining and expressing identity. RFID technologies are technologies that may be used to identify objects and thus help create the "Internet of Things". Search engines can be considered as an input door for digital content and imply an new emerging market; like a window of opportunity provided by the mutation of textual contents to audiovisual contents and the emergence of new search technologies. So, we are faced with an ever-evolving variety of technologies that promise to solve problems in the field of digital living. Each product, each technique promises to make life easier for us.

More information Digital Living & Identity

Economic Aspects of eHealth

Active and healthy ageing is a major societal challenge for European countries. At the same  time, it is an area with considerable potential for Europe. The JRC contributes to developing a more quantitative approach on the impacts of the use of ICTs in the eHealth domain.

The ageing of the European population puts at risk the sustainability of European health and social care systems. The European Commission has long recognised the potential of Information and Communications Technology (ICT) and specifically  eHealth to help contain costs and maintain high quality care, and so has launched the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing (EIP-AHA). This initiative seeks to enable EU ageing citizens to lead healthy, active and independent lives, to improve the sustainability and efficiency of social and health care systems and also to boost the competitiveness of the markets for innovative products and services, responding to the ageing challenge at both EU and global level. The JRC has been asked to develop a framework for monitoring the progress of the EIP on AHA. The objective is to develop indicators and collect quantitative data from the broad array of activities undertaken by the stakeholders involved as well as gather macro level data to support the analysis. The JRC data strategy to measure the impact of the EIP on AHA is guided by the interconnection between population, health, economic, and innovation indicators. This project benefits from JRC's work investigating the impact of ICT in the Health sector. It recently finished a study assessing the implementation and deployment of eHealth services at Hospitals in the European Union. This contribution adds to its other line of research focused on the barriers facing the deployment of Personal Health Systems, which also identified innovative approaches to integrated care in EU regions.

More information:  Economic Aspects of eHealth

   

Citizens' digital footprint

The JRC is addressing the potential misuse of citizen’s personal and individual information, generated when using digital platforms. This includes work on stolen online profiles and identities, establishing what user information is kept and how it is processed.

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Citizens’ digital footprint

Internet surveillance systems

Monitoring regularly the internet is crucial for the global security community to detect emerging threats, such as public health outbreaks and various types of instability. By applying its core scientific competences in computer science and computational linguistics to massive datasets, the JRC develops open source intelligence and analysis systems that can automatically harvest and analyse a huge amount of multi-lingual information from internet-based sources.

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Internet surveillance systems

Ethical aspects of new ICT technologies

New and emerging ICT technologies often come with new and complicated details and technical settings. The JRC ensures that aspects of security and ethics are carefully considered in order to foster confidence of European citizens in the Digital Society.

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Ethical aspects of new ICT technologies

Cybersecurity

The JRC's work also includes research to enhance cybersecurity, reinforce rules on personal data protection, as well as to ensure that critical networked systems are sufficiently secure and resilient.

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Cybersecurity

Behavioural methods for policy-making in the information society

To facilitate specific Commission services' needs in anticipating reactions to policies, the JRC will provide analysis of behaviour and social influence on lifestyle that could help to better design, for example, policy to fight the obesity epidemic. This field of research aims to help policy makers to understand people's on-line behaviour with respect to the management of their personal data.

More information: Behaviour and ICT policy 

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