Laboratories & facilities

  1. The JRC's Hopkinson Bar facility tests large material samples or structural components and sub-assemblies under dynamic conditions.


    Acronym: HopLab
  2. The hot cell laboratory has 24 shielded hot cells where up to 1 million curies can be handled including 2 decontamination cells.  Most of the cells are equipped with an alpha tight stainless steel containment, a so-called caisson, and each also has a replacement caisson for each cell. The advantage of this concept is to allow a cell renovation with a minimum downtime, with the replacement caisson able to be re-equipped and tested, while the "old" caisson is still self-contained and in operation.

     

    See each activity below a a list of methods;


    Acronym: HCL
  3. The JRC's Hydrogen Sensor Testing Facility carries out research that supports guidelines for testing hydrogen sensors, assesses their performance and reliability and provides feedback on the results to sensor manufacturers and end users.


    Acronym: SenTeF
  4. The INDOORTRON Facility is a 30m 3 walk-in environmental chamber permitting precise control of parameters such as temperature, relative humidity, air quality and exchange rate. Within its large working space, it is possible to measure emissions from equipment, determine the release dynamics of materials, test models that predict pollutant concentrations, evaluate the efficiency of air-cleaning devices and carry out human exposure studies.


  5. The JRC runs an air pollution research observatory, contributing to the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe's European Monitoring and Evaluation Programme (UNECE-EMEP).


  6. The JRC's linear electron accelerator facility (GELINA) is one of the best pulsed white spectrum neutron sources available in the world.


    Acronym: GELINA
  7. Specialised research laboratory supporting remote sensing ocean colour calibration and validation activities through the absolute calibration of passive and active optical instruments, the determination of the inherent optical properties of sea water constituents and the quantification of relevant phytoplankton pigment concentrations. The laboratory activities include operational and development components.


    Acronym: Marine Lab
  8. The MELISSA laboratory is a state-of-the art experimental facility for developing innovative surveillance applications in the maritime domain. MELISSA stands for Mimo Enhanced LInear Short Synthetic Aperture radar. Its focus is on new ways of using radars and developing the associated instrumentation – it has the capability to prototype small Radio Frequency (RF) devices, such as miniaturized radar front-end and RF receiver, and it is equipped with RF instruments for test and measurements up to 18 GHz.


    Acronym: MELISSA
  9. The JRC has up-to-date equipped laboratories to investigate nanomaterials safety as well as the detection, identification and characterisation of nanomaterials in food and consumer products. Its work focuses on a science-based understanding of nanomaterial properties and effects.

    Major topics of research include:


  10. The JRC is using the NGS-Bioinformatics infrastructure in the context of detection and characterisation of Genetically Modified Organisms (GMOs). JRC's NGS bioinformatics infrastructure has the capacity to store, manage and analyse the large quantity of data produced by the sequencer, which corresponds to some terabytes of hard disk space and has a transferring speed of up to 10 Gigabit/sec.


    Acronym: NGS