Press releases

  1. 13 Jul 2009

    Following the discovery of contaminated sunflower oil imported from Ukraine (April 2008), the European Commission's Joint Research Centre (JRC) has tested 55 analytical laboratories from 17 EU Member States plus Switzerland and Ukraine to determine their capability to measure levels of the contaminant, mineral oil, in sunflower oil. The test results are now available and show that around 80% of laboratories performed satisfactorily.

  2. 8 May 2009

    A majority of laboratories around the world are capable of effectively testing for the presence of melamine in food, according to a new study by the European Commission's Joint Research Centre (JRC). Results of the international study published this week show that levels of the harmful substance in food samples can be accurately measured by the majority of laboratories tested, suggesting that the global response to the Chinese contaminated milk scare of 2008 has been effective.

  3. 2 Mar 2009

    A Collaboration Agreement signed today between the European Commission's Joint Research Centre (Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements) and the Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science (KRISS) aims to advance measurement science and foster greater confidence in the comparability of international measurements. Areas covered will range from bioanalysis (DNA measurements) and radionuclide metrology (environmental measurements), to food control and mechanical testing (e.g. toughness of steel).

  4. 18 Feb 2011

    The European Commission's Joint Research Centre (JRC) has developed the world's first certified nanoparticle reference material based on industry-sourced nanoparticles. This new material will help ensure the comparability of measurements worldwide, thereby facilitating trade, ensuring compliance with legislation and enhancing innovation.

  5. 24 Nov 2010

    A new study which benchmarks the abilities of laboratories around the world to measure heavy metals (arsenic, cadmium, lead, mercury, methylmercury and inorganic arsenic) in seafood has been published today by the Joint Research Centre. The outcome of the exercise was generally positive, with 80 to 96% o laboratories obtaining satisfactory scores, depending on the heavy metal considered. This result corroborates seafood consumers' protection in the EU, where the levels of lead, cadmium and total mercury are regulated by law.

  6. 26 Oct 2010

    The first group of graduates of a new European Master's degree received their diplomas at the European Commission's Joint Research Centre (JRC) in Geel, Belgium. The degree, "Measurement Science in Chemistry", was based on training initiatives developed by the JRC's Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM).

  7. 11 Sep 2007

    Today, the President of Eurolab, Jean-Luc Laurent, and the Director of the JRC Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM), Alejandro Herrero, signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) in Geel, Belgium.

  8. 29 Jul 2011

    The European Commission's Joint Research Centre has developed three new methods to detect an illegal clouding agent which can be found in sports drinks imported from Taiwan.

  9. 4 Dec 2009

    EU countries are the biggest consumers of chocolate confectioneries in the world. A method developed by the European Commission's Joint Research Centre (JRC) to measure vegetable fats in milk chocolate has become the first such method to be adopted as an international standard by the International Organisation for Standardisation (ISO). It has been developed to enable the enforcement of the so-called Chocolate Directive, which stipulates that European chocolate must not contain more than 5% vegetable fats, other than cocoa butter.

  10. 17 Sep 2012

    A new report by the European Commission's Joint Research Centre (JRC) presents an in-depth review of methods available to measure the size of nanoparticles. Following the adoption of the definition of the term 'nanomaterial' in October 2011, this report identifies relevant measurement methods and key challenges for measuring nanoparticle size in the regulatory context. The report underlines that no single measurement method can be used for all materials to determine if each of them falls within the regulatory definition. Different methods will be required depending on the material under investigation.