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Monitoring emissions from large industrial installations – new guidance published

the JRC has published a new guidebook on how to monitor emissions from large industrial installations the JRC has published a new guidebook on how to monitor emissions from large industrial installations
©AdobeStock, Frank Ebert
Oct 09 2018

The Joint Research Centre has published a new guidance to help competent authorities in Member States regulate emissions to air and water from about 55 000 large industrial installations across Europe.

The guidance also contains useful information for operators of these installations, and will facilitate development of new or improved environmental standards in the future.

The guidance on monitoring of emissions to air and water from IED installations covers a range of topics relating to gathering, treating and reporting emission monitoring data.

It aims to improve the quality of monitoring data from industrial installations.

The guidance is the outcome of an information exchange between Member States authorities, the industries concerned, environmental NGOs and European standardisation committees.

The document is based on an older version that has now been significantly enlarged, updated and improved.

Background

The Industrial Emissions Directive 2010/75/EU (IED) provides a framework for regulating about 55 000 (agro) industrial installations across the EU. An installation whose operation falls within the scope of the Directive requires a permit which is to be based on Best Available Techniques (BAT) documents.

Best Available Techniques conclusions aim at achieving a high level of protection of the environment as a whole, taking into account the economic and technical viability.

The drafting of Best Available Techniques conclusions is carried out by Technical Working Groups.

They are led by the European Commission's Joint Research Centre (JRC) through its European Integrated Pollution Prevention and Control Bureau (EIPPCB) and involve experts from Member States authorities, the industries concerned, environmental NGOs and other services of the European Commission.

Monitoring emissions to air and water represents an important element in regulating the environmental impacts of industrial installations.

The new guidance does not contain Best Available Techniques conclusions, but aims to support their implementation and drafting by:

  • informing competent authorities and operators about techniques to monitor emissions to air and water;
  • bringing together information on emissions monitoring that may be of use for the development of BAT conclusions including BAT-associated emission levels.

The EIPPCB is currently reviewing or drawing up Best Available Techniques reference documents for the following sectors: food, drink and milk; waste incineration; surface treatment using organic solvents (including wood and wood products preservation with chemicals); ferrous metals processing; textiles; common waste gas treatment in the chemical sector; slaughterhouses and animal by-products; smitheries and foundries.

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