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The JRC report stresses the need for better awareness and coordination between existing knowledge sources on Replacement, Reduction and Refinement of animal testing, for their greater impact. The JRC report stresses the need for better awareness and coordination between existing knowledge sources on Replacement, Reduction and Refinement of animal testing, for their greater impact.
©EU, 2017
Feb 20 2017

The JRC has carried out a study of available knowledge on the replacement, reduction and refinement (the 3Rs) of animal procedures used in research and testing to understand how supply of such knowledge can better meet demand. Findings show that although much 3Rs knowledge exists, its sharing can be improved through better coordination, communication and outreach, and by more emphasis on targeted education and training initiatives.

Human body representation Three JRC-developed adverse outcome pathways have been recently published by the OECD
©Fotolia 100886697
Sep 30 2016
The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) has recently published the first five adverse outcome pathways (AOP), three of which have been developed by the JRC. The AOPs are novel knowledge management tools in toxicology and are useful for supporting risk assessment to human health. They are also valuable for helping to avoid animal testing through the use of alternative methods.
The EU survey on alternatives to animal testing aims to identify knowledge gaps in the area. The EU survey on alternatives to animal testing aims to identify knowledge gaps in the area.
©EU, 2016
Feb 01 2016

Public survey launched following the European Commission's communication in response to the European Citizens' Initiative "Stop Vivisection".

High tech research lab The JRC manages the EU Reference Laboratory for Alternatives to Animal Testing (EURL ECVAM)
©EU, 2015
Oct 20 2015

Novel, non-animal tools and scientific methodologies show high potential for the assessment of combined effects of chemicals on humans and the environment.

Two scientists discussing next to lab equipment JRC scientists work on ways to integrate data obtained through non-animal tests with computer models of the human body.
©EU, 2015
Jul 14 2015

The JRC-run EU Reference Laboratory for Alternatives to Animal Testing (EURL ECVAM) has just published its strategy to promote ways of integrating data obtained through non-animal tests with computer models of the human body.

Scientist using a laboratory microscope Microscopic examination of cells treated with cytotoxic chemicals.
©EU, 2015
Jun 03 2015

The European Commission today issued a Communication in response to the European Citizens’ Initiative Stop Vivisection.

A graphic of a balance with male and female symbols on each side A sex-specific approach is gaining acceptance in clinical medicine, but has yet to be established in toxicology.
©Fotolia, Pixel
Apr 21 2015

Female liver cells, and in particular those in menopaused women, are more susceptible to adverse effects of drugs than their male counterparts, according to new research carried out by the JRC.

A skin allergy test on the forearm of a person. Skin allergies are estimated to affect already 20% of the population in Europe.
©Fotolia, Gorilla
Mar 02 2015

The JRC has validated and recommended a new method which is not based on animal testing, to identify chemicals that can trigger skin allergies, estimated to affect already 20% of the population in Europe.
 

A zebrafish Zebrafish is one of the most commonly fish used in toxicological testing.
©mirkorrosenau4, Fotolia.com
Jan 22 2015

The JRC has released a new strategy on how to replace, reduce and refine the use of fish in testing of chemicals’ effect on flora and fauna in water (aquatic toxicity) and chemicals’ uptake and concentration in living organisms (bioaccumulation). Out of the 11.5 million animals used for experimental purposes in the EU (2011 data), cold blooded animals, namely reptiles, amphibians and fish represent 12.4%. In the case of specific testing for toxicological safety assessment, fish represent 18% of the one million animals used.

Staining platform deck with '96' head High throughput robotic system to accelerate new toxicology testing based on cell systems
©EU, 2010
Sep 24 2014

In support of EU legislation on safety of chemicals, the JRC has published a state-of-the art review of test methods and non-testing (computational) approaches that help promote the replacement, reduction, and refinement of animal experiments - known as the 3Rs - in the safety assessment of chemicals.  The report "Alternative methods for regulatory toxicology – a state-of-the-art review" focuses on "non-standard" methods, i.e. those that are not included in current regulatory guidelines.

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