JRC News

  1. 12 Mar 2015

    Under the auspices of the International Council for the Exploration of the Sea (ICES), the JRC helps to overcome the limitations of conventional stock assessment methods by promoting innovative approaches such as the Assessment for All (a4a) model. The exchange of such approaches between scientists at global level ensures that the best methods can be applied when developing management advice for fisheries, but also highlights the need for more research in fish stock assessment.

  2. 3 Mar 2015

    A JRC-organised session on coastal and marine ecosystem services generated a lot of interest and positive feedback from the participants at last month’s annual Association of the Sciences of Limnology & Oceanography (ASLO) 2015 meeting in Granada, Spain.

     

    This year’s ASLO meeting, the theme of which was “Aquatic Sciences: Global And Regional Perspectives — North Meets South”, was attended by more than 5 000 scientists from all over the world.

     

  3. 16 Jan 2015

    A habitat model, developed by the JRC and partner scientists, reveals that the main hake nurseries are mostly located from February to June in the northern Mediterranean, on the seabed in depths from 50 to 250 m. Such knowledge can guide decisions for sustainable fisheries management, such as the closure of fishing areas allowing hake stocks to recover from overfishing.

  4. 5 Jan 2015

    The JRC, in collaboration with the Italian coast guard service, has developed a new method to verify whether ship positions reported with the Automatic Identification System (AIS) are correct. This effective method does not need any additional sensors or technologies and it makes it possible to validate reported data and detect unintentionally incorrect, jammed or deliberately falsified information reported by ships.

  5. 22 Dec 2014

    Higher market prices and the recovery of some fish stocks helped the EU fishing fleet to again improve its profitability in 2012. Despite the economic crisis and less fish being landed, economic performance has more than doubled over the last 5 years, from 3.2% net profit in 2008 to 6.6% in 2012.

  6. 4 Dec 2014

    A recently published article, led by the JRC, reviews the impacts of invasive alien marine species on ecosystem services and biodiversity in Europe. The review identifies 86 alien marine species, within 13 phyla, which have significant (negative and/or positive) impacts on ecosystem services and biodiversity in European seas. It classifies the type of impact, comments on the methods applied for assessing the impact and the related inferential strength, and reports on information gaps.

     

  7. 3 Dec 2014

    The JRC co-edited a book on optical remote sensing applied to ocean climate investigations, together with the European Space Agency and the Space Dynamic Laboratory of the Utah University, and with the contribution of many international experts.

  8. 17 Nov 2014

    A recently published PLOS ONE article, co-authored by the JRC, finds that, in the absence of strong saltwater inflows, the deep areas of the Baltic Sea would become less saline and more anoxic, while near-bottom average conditions could improve in shallower areas.

     

    The study simulates the changes in salinity, nutrients and oxygen dynamics in the Baltic Sea area by accurately modelling the effects of Major Baltic Inflows (MBIs) during the period 1991–2009, and comparing the results with those of a scenario in which these strong saltwater inflows are supressed.

     

  9. 7 Nov 2014

    New software developed by the JRC is being tested in two maritime operational centres in Kenya and the Seychelles to help fight piracy and improve maritime security. The software provides a live picture of ship traffic activity, indicating current ship positions on a digital map. By combining data from a number of different vessel reporting and earth observation systems, it creates a single maritime picture of the entire western Indian Ocean.

  10. 6 Nov 2014

    A JRC co-authored paper, published in PLOS ONE yesterday, provides new insights on a previously overlooked mechanism of surface water fertilisation, which could help explain why the Alboran Sea is one of the most productive (from phytoplankton to fish) areas of the Mediterranean.