JRC News

  1. 23 Jun 2015

    The JRC has played a central role in the OECD testing programme of representative manufactured nanomaterials. The programme was led by the OECD Working Party on Manufactured Nanomaterials (WPMN) and had the objective to ensure that the approaches for assessment of hazard, exposure and risk for manufactured nanomaterials “are of a high quality, science-based and internationally harmonised."

  2. 21 Oct 2014

    JRC portal gives quick overview of where information is available about a chemical across public repositories

  3. 24 Sep 2014

    In support of EU legislation on safety of chemicals, the JRC has published a state-of-the art review of test methods and non-testing (computational) approaches that help promote the replacement, reduction, and refinement of animal experiments - known as the 3Rs - in the safety assessment of chemicals.  The report "Alternative methods for regulatory toxicology – a state-of-the-art review" focuses on "non-standard" methods, i.e. those that are not included in current regulatory guidelines.

  4. 7 Feb 2014

    On 22 January, the European Commission issued a Recommendation on minimum principles for the exploration and production of hydrocarbons (such as shale gas) using high volume hydraulic fracturing in order to contribute to bringing clarity and predictability to public authorities, market operators and citizens. It invites Member States to follow minimum principles when applying or adapting their legislation applicable to hydrocarbons exploration or production using high volume hydraulic fracturing.

  5. 12 Dec 2013

    On 9 December 2013, the JRC launched FACET, a Flavourings, Additives, and food Contact materials Exposure Tool consisting of a downloadable programme to estimate the EU consumers' exposure to these substances.

  6. 2 Apr 2013

    An expert group, chaired by the JRC, confirms that the scientific identification of endocrine disrupting substances should be based on the demonstration of both endocrine activity and an adverse effect caused by it. A wide range of substances are under scrutiny for endocrine disrupting properties, such as plastic additives in consumer goods, a number of industrial chemicals, cleaning agents, pesticides and by-products of industrial processes like dioxins.

  7. 28 Feb 2012

    When assessing the safety of chemical substances, knowledge on absorption, distribution (including the bioaccumulative potential), metabolism and excretion is essential. A lot of this information can be generated through in vitro and in silico test methods at tissue, cell or sub-cellular level. This information can be used as input parameters for physiologically-based toxicokinetic modelling (PBTK). Such computer modelling can help reducing the numbers of animal experiments by better targeting critical parameters. It has the potential to contribute to the replacement of animal tests in future.

  8. 21 Dec 2010

    The protection of animals used in scientific procedures such as safety testing of chemicals or cosmetics is of great concern to European citizens. Taking up this concern, the European Commission has launched several regulations that underline the European Union's commitment to improve animal welfare (e.g. Cosmetics Directive, REACH chemicals legislation) by promoting the use of alternatives to animal testing. A strong and continuous dialogue with key stakeholders in this area is recognised as pivotal for progress.

  9. 8 Oct 2010

    On 30 September and 1 October, the JRC Institute for Health and Consumer Protection (IHCP) organised a workshop on the applicability of QSAR (Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship) models and other non-testing approaches in risk assessment. These theoretical models can be used to predict the physicochemical, biological and environmental fate properties of molecules. The careful use of such approaches can reduce and focus experimental efforts, and in particular reduce the need for animal experimentation.