JRC News

  1. 16 Jul 2015

    The results of a recently carried out proficiency test (PT) on the analysis of trace elements in natural seawater demonstrated the challenges for laboratories because of low levels of trace elements and high salt concentration in the seawater. The use of proper standard analytical methods, such as ISO 17294-2, and sensitive techniques, notably coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was crucial to obtaining a good performance.

  2. 6 Jul 2015

    On 6 July, the JRC, together with the Directorate-General for the Environment presented some of the main findings from the development of an EMAS Sectoral Reference Document on Best Environmental Management Practice for the agriculture sector.

  3. 2 Jul 2015

    In a correspondence published today in Nature, IES scientist Giovanni Strona comments on the remarkable possibility of buying the rights to name a new species, one of the highest honors in zoology, through eBay.

    For a few thousand dollars, anyone can buy the privilege of naming a ‘small rare’ species. Looking at the previous closed auctions, it is likely that this would be a fish parasite.

  4. 26 Jun 2015

    JRC scientist G. Hanke is co-author of a chapter in a recently published open access book on ‘Marine Anthropogenic Litter’, which summarises the current state of knowledge on all aspects of marine anthropogenic litter.

  5. 18 May 2015

    A recent peer-reviewed paper, led by the JRC, describes a new method for measuring the structure and configuration of ecological networks, which shows that nestedness in ecological networks is less common than previously thought.

    This finding challenges the assumption that ecological networks are stable due to their inherent nestedness. It finds that most ecological networks actually tend towards patterns of segregation and specialisation, which may be the key to species coexistence.

  6. 13 May 2015

    In March this year, JRC scientist Peter Vogt delivered two workshops on the JRC’s GuidosToolbox spatial pattern analysis software in South Africa, one as a follow up to the International Symposium on Silviculture and Management of Dryland Forests, and the second on the request of the CEO of the South African National Space Agency (SANSA) in Pretoria within the context of the JRC-SANSA collaboration agreement and the EU-South Africa Space Dialogue.

     

  7. 4 May 2015

    JRC scientist Bruna Grizzetti is co-author of a recently published World Wildlife Fund (WWF) Science Brief on how human activities have dramatically altered the nitrogen cycle, which presents one of the main global challenges to human health, ecosystem integrity and biodiversity.

     

    Human activities have altered the global nitrogen cycle even more than the global carbon cycle. The science brief reports that the planetary boundary for nitrogen has been breached by a factor of two, making nitrogen one of the most urgent pressures on the Earth system.

     

  8. 13 Mar 2015

    A recently published JRC report describes a methodological framework for the biophysical assessment and economic valuation of water ecosystem services in Europe.

    The methodology aims to help understand how multiple pressures can affect the delivery and value of such services. It is flexible, can be applied at different scales/locations and is easy to follow, presenting the basic concepts and assumptions to be established before the analysis, and a ‘shopping bag’ of appropriate tools to assess and value ecosystem services.

  9. 3 Mar 2015

    A JRC-organised session on coastal and marine ecosystem services generated a lot of interest and positive feedback from the participants at last month’s annual Association of the Sciences of Limnology & Oceanography (ASLO) 2015 meeting in Granada, Spain.

     

    This year’s ASLO meeting, the theme of which was “Aquatic Sciences: Global And Regional Perspectives — North Meets South”, was attended by more than 5 000 scientists from all over the world.

     

  10. 10 Feb 2015

    The JRC recently published a paper highlighting the importance of free open-access satellite data for biodiversity conservation.