FAQ

  1. What are the JRC's main priorities in FP7?
    30/04/2014

     

    The JRC has identified 7 priority areas. These are groupings of actions which are related in terms of theme of study, scientific support fields, required experimental facilities and overall expertise. These groups of actions require similar competencies and contribute to same overall policy area:

    • Food chain;
    • Biotechnology, chemicals, health;
    • Environment ,climate change, natural disasters;
    • Energy and Transport;
    • Nuclear Energy, Safety and Security;
    • Lisbon agenda, information society, rural development;
    • Internal/External security, antifraud and development aid;
  2. What is the JRC's role in the FP7?
    30/04/2014

    The JRC is primarily involved in the Seventh Framework Programme (FP7) through its own research activities - known as‘direct actions'. These are organised in two specific programmes: one focusing on prosperity in a knowledge intensive society, sustainable management of resources, security and freedom,  Europe as a world partner; and one covering the nuclear field: treatment and storage of nuclear waste, non-proliferation, reactor safety, nuclear medicine and radiation monitoring. In addition, the JRC is eligible to participate in FP7 instruments on the same basis as any other research organisation in Europe ('indirect actions').

  3. How is the JRC's work organised?
    30/04/2014

    The JRC's Multi-Annual Work-programme (MAWP) 2007-2013, provides a general description of the line of work and the accompanying actions which are undertaken during the 7th Framework Programme (FP7) period. The Multi-annual work-programme is complemented, at the beginning of each year, by an annual work-programme, which details the Actions to be undertaken by the JRC for that year.

  4. What is the JRC?
    30/04/2014

    The European Commission's Joint Research Centre (JRC) is a department (Directorate-General, DG) of the European Commission providing independent scientific and technological support for EU policy-making. It works closely on the development of EU legislation with the relevant Commission services, such as the Agricultural, Enterprise, Environment, and Health and Consumer Protection DGs. Knowledge comes from specific application- and issue-oriented research within the seven JRC Institutes and close co-operation with over 1000 public and private organisations in 150 networks in Member State and applicant countries. The JRC also liases with non-EU and global scientific and standard-setting bodies.

    Institutes: IES, IHCP
    Keywords: actinide
  5. What type of work are you involved in the cancer therapy research?
    30/04/2014

    The cancer research program at JRC-ITU focuses on all stages of developing targeted alpha therapy (TAT) from bench to bedside, including the development of innovative methods for the production of alpha emitters, pre-clinical studies in vitro and in vivo, as well as conducting clinical trials in collaboration with hospitals in Europe and world-wide.

    Institutes: ITU
    Keywords: nuclear, actinide, cancer, citizen, collaboration, health, innovation, microbiology
  6. How can the Atomic Detectives' work answer to a forensic case?
    30/04/2014

    Recognised as a centre of excellence by national and international policing bodies, JRC-ITU has developed various methods that allow identification of the origin of intercepted material and the probable intended application. This needs to be done in a prompt manner, with first results available to be delivered to the appropriate authorities within 24 hours of a sample first arriving.

    Institutes: ITU
    Keywords: nuclear, citizen, collaboration, fuel, safeguards, security, surveillance, transport
  7. How many Safeguards samples are analysed yearly at JRC-ITU?
    30/04/2014

    Under the Euratom Treaty, the European Commission, through the Directorate General for Energy, has the duty to assure that the nuclear material is only used for declared, peaceful purposes. In order to verify the flow of nuclear material, analyses are carried out at the JRC-ITU labs. In addition, analytical on-site laboratories at the two largest European reprocessing plants were set up by the JRC-ITU, an average of 1000 sample's are analysed per year.

    At international level, the European Commission also cooperates with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) on the control of nuclear materials and facilities in order to avoid proliferation or diversion. In this area, JRC-ITU analyses 100 environmental samples (particles on cotton swipes) per year, supporting both Euratom and IAEA requests.

    Institutes: ITU
    Keywords: nuclear, citizen, collaboration, fuel, remote sensing, safeguards, security, surveillance, transport
  8. How many forensic cases have been analysed at JRC-ITU?
    30/04/2014

    In the last 20 years JRC-ITU has been analysing almost 50 cases of confiscated nuclear or radioactive materials.

    Institutes: ITU
    Keywords: nuclear, citizen, collaboration, safeguards, security, surveillance, transport
  9. At what age is it possible to visit the JRC-ITU laboratories?
    30/04/2014

    To visit the laboratories, all visitors must be at least 18 years old - However the entire site has an access restriction for those under the age of 18. This is in line with German Radio Protection Law.

    Institutes: ITU
    Keywords: nuclear, facility, citizen, infrastructure
  10. Is the Karlsruhe nuclide chart available on-line?
    30/04/2014

    Yes, since January 2012 the management of the nuclide chart has been licensed to Nucleonica GmbH – this company provides many online tools for analysing and interacting with the nuclide chart online.

    Institutes: ITU
    Keywords: nuclear, fuel, actinide, reference data, R&D