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The Digital Competence Framework 2.0

DigComp 2.0 identifies the key components of digital competence in 5 areas which can be summarised as below:

1) Information and data literacy: To articulate information needs, to locate and retrieve digital data, information and content. To judge the relevance of the source and its content. To store, manage, and organise digital data, information and content.
2) Communication and collaboration: To interact, communicate and collaborate through digital technologies while being aware of cultural and generational diversity. To participate in society through public and private digital services and participatory citizenship. To manage one’s digital identity and reputation.
3) Digital content creation: To create and edit digital content To improve and integrate information and content into an existing body of knowledge while understanding how copyright and licences are to be applied. To know how to give understandable instructions for a computer system.
4) Safety: To protect devices, content, personal data and privacy in digital environments. To protect physical and psychological health, and to be aware of digital technologies for social well-being and social inclusion. To be aware of the environmental impact of digital technologies and their use.
5) Problem solving: To identify needs and problems, and to resolve conceptual problems and problem situations in digital environments. To use digital tools to innovate processes and products. To keep up-to-date with the digital evolution.

The DigComp Conceptual reference model

Competence areas
Dimension 1
Competences
Dimension 2

1. Information and data literacy

1.1 Browsing, searching and filtering data, information and digital content

To articulate information needs , to search for data, information and content in digital environments, to access them and to navigate between them. To create and update personal search strategies.

1.2 Evaluating data, information and digital content

To analyse, compare and critically evaluate the credibility and reliability of sources of data, information and digital content. To analyse, interpret and critically evaluate the data, information and digital content.

1.3 Managing data, information and digital content

To organise, store and retrieve data, information and content in digital environments. To organise and process them in a structured environment.

2. Communication and collaboration

2.1 Interacting through digital technologies

To interact through a variety of digital technologies and to understand appropriate digital communication means for a given context.

2.2 Sharing through digital technologies

To share data, information and digital content with others through appropriate digital technologies. To act as an intermediary, to know about referencing and attribution practices.

2.3 Engaging in citizenship through digital technologies

To participate in society through the use of public and private digital services. To seek opportunities for self-empowerment and for participatory citizenship through appropriate digital technologies.

2.4 Collaborating through digital technologies

To use digital tools and technologies for collaborative processes, and for co-construction and co-creation of resources and knowledge.

2.5 Netiquette

To be aware of behavioural norms and know-how while using digital technologies and interacting in digital environments. To adapt communication strategies to the specific audience and to be aware of cultural and generational diversity in digital environments.

2.6 Managing digital identity

To create and manage one or multiple digital identities, to be able to protect one's own reputation, to deal with the data that one produces through several digital tools, environments and services.

3. Digital content creation

3.1 Developing digital content

To create and edit digital content in different formats, to express oneself through digital means.

3.2 Integrating and re-elaborating digital content

To modify, refine, improve and integrate information and content into an existing body of knowledge to create new, original and relevant content and knowledge.

3.3 Copyright and licences

To understand how copyright and licences apply to data, information and digital content.

3. 4 Programming

To plan and develop a sequence of understandable instructions for a computing system to solve a given problem or perform a specific task.

4. Safety

4.1 Protecting devices

To protect devices and digital content, and to understand risks and threats in digital environments. To know about safety and security measures and to have due regard to reliability and privacy.

4.2 Protecting personal data and privacy

To protect personal data and privacy in digital environments. To understand how to use and share personally identifiable information while being able to protect oneself and others from damages. To understand that digital services use a “Privacy policy” to inform how personal data is used.

4.3 Protecting health and well-being

To be able to avoid health-risks and threats to physical and psychological well-being while using digital technologies. To be able to protect oneself and others from possible dangers in digital environments (e.g. cyber bullying). To be aware of digital technologies for social well-being and social inclusion.

4.4 Protecting the environment

To be aware of the environmental impact of digital technologies and their use.

5. Problem solving

5.1 Solving technical problems

To identify technical problems when operating devices and using digital environments, and to solve them (from trouble-shooting to solving more complex problems).

5.2 Identifying needs and technological responses

To assess needs and to identify, evaluate, select and use digital tools and possible technological responses to solve them. To adjust and customise digital environments to personal needs (e.g. accessibility).

5.3 Creatively using digital technologies

To use digital tools and technologies to create knowledge and to innovate processes and products. To engage individually and collectively in cognitive processing to understand and resolve conceptual problems and problem situations in digital environments.

5.4 Identifying digital competence gaps

To understand where one’s own digital competence needs to be improved or updated. To be able to support others with their digital competence development. To seek opportunities for self-development and to keep up-to-date with the digital evolution.

The glossary of the new terms:

Content in different formats
e.g. text document, graphics, images, video, music, multimedia, web-pages stored using a standard file format, 3-D printing.
See more at: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File_format
File formats can be either proprietary, free and/or open.
Data
a sequence of one or more symbols given meaning by specific act(s) of interpretation. Data can be analysed or used in an effort to gain knowledge or make decisions. Digital data is represented using the binary number system of ones (1) and zeros (0) as opposed to its analogue representation.
Sources: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Data_%28computing%29
http://www.thefreedictionary.com/data
Digital communication
communication using digital technology. Various modes of communication exist, e.g. synchronous communication (real time communication, e.g. using skype or video chat or Bluetooth) and asynchronous ones (not concurrent communication, e.g. email, forum to send a message, sms) using for example, one to one, one to many, or many to many modes.
Digital content
any type of content that exists in the form of digital data that are encoded in a machine-readable format, and can be created, viewed, distributed, modified and stored using computers and digital technologies, e.g. the internet. The content can be either free or pay content. Examples of digital content include: web pages and websites, social media, data and databases, digital audio, such as mp3s, and e-books, digital imagery, digital video, video games, computer programmes and software.
Digital environment
a context, or a "place", that is enabled by technology and digital devices, often transmitted over the internet, or other digital means, e.g. mobile phone network. Records and evidence of an individual's interaction with a digital environment constitute their digital footprint. In DigComp, the term digital environment is used as a backdrop for digital actions without naming a specific technology or tool.
Digital services (public or private)
services that can be delivered through digital communication, e.g. internet, mobile phone network that might include delivery of digital information (e.g. data, content) and/or transactional services. They can be either public or private, e.g. e-government, digital banking services, e-commerce, music services (e.g. Spotify), film/tv services (e.g. Netflix).
Digital technology
any product that can be used to create, view, distribute, modify, store, retrieve, transmit and receive information electronically in a digital form. For example, personal computers and devices (e.g. a desktop, laptop, netbook, tablet computer, smart phones, PDA with mobile phone facilities, games consoles, media players, e-book readers), digital television, robots.
Modified from source: http://www.tutor2u.net/business/ict/intro_what_is_ict.htm
Digital tools
digital technologies (see: digital technology) used for a given purpose or for carrying out a particular function of information processing, communication, content creation, safety or problem solving.
Privacy policy
the term related to the protection of personal data, for example, how a service provider collects, stores, protects, discloses, transfers and uses information (data) about its users, what data are collected, etc.
Problem solving
“an individual’s capacity to engage in cognitive processing to understand and resolve problem situations where a method of solution is not immediately obvious. It includes the willingness to engage with such situations in order to achieve one’s potential as a constructive and reflective citizen” (OECD, 2014).
Well-being
the term is related to the WHO definition of good health as a state of complete physical, social and mental well-being, and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity. Social well-being refers to the sense of involvement with others and with the communities (e.g. access and use of social capital, social trust, social connectedness and social networks).
Social inclusion
the process of improving the terms for individuals and groups to take part in society (by the World Bank). Social inclusion aims to empower poor and marginalized people to take advantage of burgeoning global opportunities. It ensures that people have a voice in decisions which affect their lives and that they enjoy equal access to markets, services and political, social and physical spaces.
Structured environment
where data resides in a fixed field within a record or file, e.g. relational databases and spreadsheets.
Technological response/solution
refers to the attempt to use technology (and/or engineering) to solve a problem.