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International Partnerships

Cabinda Farmers Club

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Farmers in Angola work individually, are unaware of sustainable agricultural methods, and struggle to prosperously develop their activity. The Cabinda Farmers Club (‘Clube de Agricultores de Cabinda’) was set up in 2013 to help these farmers increase their production in quantity and quality, and reduce food insecurity and poverty in the country, while respecting their environment.

The project was implemented by HUMANA, Fundación Pueblo para Pueblo, and ADPP Angola, in the municipalities of Cacongo and Buco Zau in the Cabinda province in Angola. This 3-year project was allocated a budget of €709,270.67, of which the EU funded 75%.

Key information

Total budget
EUR 709 270.67
EU contribution
EUR 53 153.00
Duration
February 2013 to June 2016
Implementing organisation
HUMANA, Fundación Pueblo para Pueblo, ADPP Angola
Funding instrument
DCI - Non State Actors and Local Authorities in development

Objective

By training farmers to low-cost sustainable agricultural practices and higher quality standards, and helping them to get organised, the Cabinda Farmers Club project seeks to help farmers increase their production and income, and eventually ensure better health and wellbeing among these communities, with the long-term objective of achieving food security and eradicating malnutrition in this region.

Results

The project closed in 2016 and its results exceeded all expectations:

  • 20 farmers clubs were created in 31 villages.
  • 1170 farmers were supported, of which 903 (77%) were women.
  • 1015 agriculture kits were distributed.
  • 425 training sessions were organised.
  • 20 experimental fields were set up.
  • 20 water pumps were installed for irrigation.
  • 4 commercialisation committees were created.

Impact

By transforming their business model, the project has had a positive impact on these farming communities.

Instead of working individually for private field owners, local farmers learned to work together to share costs, yield more income from their production, notably by producing more and nutritrious food and selling their surplus.

They learned to practice a sustainable form of agriculture, resulting in farming practices that are now better adjusted to their environment and nutritional needs, and more long-term oriented.

As 77% of the project’s beneficiaries were women, the project also helped increase women empowerment in the region.