REPowerEU actions

The new geopolitical and energy market realities require us to drastically accelerate our clean energy transition and increase Europe's energy independence from unreliable suppliers and volatile fossil fuels.

REPowerEU is the European Commission’s plan to make Europe independent from Russian fossil fuels well before 2030, in light of Russia's invasion of Ukraine.

85% of Europeans believe that the EU should reduce its dependency on Russian gas and oil as soon as possible to support Ukraine. By acting as a Union, Europe can achieve this faster.

The REPowerEU plan sets out a series of measures to rapidly reduce dependence on Russian fossil fuels and fast forward the green transition, while increasing the resilience of the EU-wide energy system. It is based on:

Natural gas station

Diversifying

The EU is working with international partners to find alternative energy supplies. In the short-term, we need alternative supplies of gas, oil and coal as quickly as possible, and looking to the future we will need renewable hydrogen too.

a couple looking at energy bills

Saving

Every citizen, business and organisation can save energy. Small behavioural changes, if we all commit to them, can make a significant difference. Contingency measures for supply interruptions will also be needed.

Wind farm

Accelerating clean energy

Renewables are the cheapest and cleanest energy available, and can be produced domestically, reducing our need for energy imports. REPowerEU will speed up the green transition and spur massive investment in renewable energy. We also need to enable industry and transport to substitute fossil fuels faster to bring down emissions and dependencies.

   

 

Clean energy

Ending the EU’s reliance on Russian fossil fuels will require a massive scale-up of renewables as well as faster electrification and replacement of fossil-based heat and fuel in industry, buildings and the transport sector. The clean energy transition will help lower energy prices over time and reduce import dependency. 

Sign on a car powered by hydrogen Renewables are the cheapest and cleanest energy available, and can be generated domestically, reducing our need for energy imports. The Commission is proposing to increase the EU’s 2030 target for renewables from the current 40% to 45%. The REPowerEU Plan would bring the total renewable energy generation capacities to 1,236 GW by 2030, in comparison to the 1,067 GW by 2030, envisaged under Fit for 55 for 2030.

The EU Solar Energy Strategy will boost the roll-out of photovoltaic energy. As part of the REPowerEU plan, this strategy aims to bring online over 320 GW of solar photovoltaic newly installed by 2025, over twice today’s level, and almost 600 GW by 2030. These frontloaded additional capacities displace the consumption of 9 bcm of natural gas annually by 2027.

Clean industry

Replacing coal, oil and gas in industrial processes will help cut the dependency on Russian fossil fuels, while transitioning to cleaner energy sources, strengthening industrial competitiveness and supporting international technology leadership. 

an employee working on a solar panel
  • Electrification, energy efficiency and uptake of renewables could allow industry to save 35 bcm of natural gas by 2030 beyond Fit for 55 targets
  • Largest reductions in gas, almost 22 bcm, could be made from non-metallic minerals, cement, glass and ceramics, chemicals production and refineries
  • Around 30% of EU primary steel production is expected to be decarbonized on the basis of renewable hydrogen by 2030

The industrial sector will also play a key role in scaling up the production of equipment and components necessary to quickly transform our energy system.

Saving energy

Saving energy is the cheapest, safest and cleanest way to reduce our reliance on fossil fuel imports from Russia. We can all easily be involved in reducing our energy consumption, from consumers and businesses to all industrial sectors. Together with energy efficiency measures, our individual actions will have a positive impact on prices - directly reducing our energy bills, making our economy more resilient and accelerating EU’s clean energy transition.

Electric household appliance

There are many ways to reduce energy consumption in our daily lives, including by:

  • Reducing heating temperatures or using less air-conditioning
  • Using household appliances more efficiently
  • Driving more economically
  • Shifting to more public transport and active mobility
  • Switching off the lights

All energy users need to be aware of the best savings opportunities and the most effective steps they can take. The Commission will support citizens with targeted information to help them make informed choices and energy efficient purchases. We will work together with organisations like the International Energy Agency, Member States and local authorities to identify and promote the most effective energy saving actions.

Financing REPowerEU

Additional investments of €210 billion are needed between now and 2027 to phase out Russian fossil fuel imports, which are currently costing European taxpayers nearly €100 billion per year. 

euro symbol

The Recovery and Resilience Facility (RRF) is at the heart of the REPowerEU Plan implementation, providing additional EU funding. Member States should add a REPowerEU chapter to their Recovery and Resilience Plans to channel investments to REPowerEU priorities and make the necessary reforms.

Member States can use the remaining RRF loans (currently €225 billion) and new RRF grants funded by the auctioning of Emission Trading System allowances, currently held in the Market Stability Reserve, worth €20 billion.

Other sources of REPowerEU financing include:

  • Cohesion Policy funds
  • European Agricultural Fund for Rural Development
  • Connecting Europe Facility
  • Innovation Fund
  • National and EU funding in support of REPowerEU objectives
  • National fiscal measures
  • Private investment
  • The European Investment Bank

Working with international partners

We want to build long-term partnerships that are mutually beneficial – boosting renewable energy and increasing energy efficiency around the globe and cooperating on green technology and innovation. The new EU Energy Platform will play a key role in pooling demand, coordinating infrastructure use, negotiating with the international partners and preparing for joint gas and hydrogen purchases.

Actions:

  • Increasing Liquified natural gas (LNG) deliveries from the US and Canada and pipeline and LNG gas from Norway
  • Intensify cooperation with Azerbaijan, especially on the Southern Gas Corridor
  • Political agreements with gas suppliers like Egypt and Israel to increase LNG supplies
  • Restart energy dialogue with Algeria
  • Continued cooperation with major producers in the Gulf, including Qatar, as well as with Australia
  • Coordination with gas buyers such as Japan, China and Korea
  • Explore the export potential of sub-Saharan African countries like Nigeria, Senegal and Angola

The EU will also keep working with G7, G20 and other international fora, including OPEC and the IEA, to ensure well-functioning global oil markets.

Timeline

  • 26 July 2022

    Based on the Commission's proposal, the Council reaches agreement to ensure an orderly and coordinated reduction of gas consumption across the EU to prepare for the coming winter.

  • 20 July 2022

    Save Gas for a Safe Winter: The Commission proposes gas demand reduction plan to prepare EU for supply cuts

  • 18 July 2022

    The EU and Azerbaijan sign a new Memorandum of Understanding on a Strategic Partnership in the Field of Energy, laying the foundations for a long-term partnership on energy efficiency and clean energy. Thanks to this, the capacity of the Southern Gas Corridor will be doubled to deliver at least 20 billion cubic metres to the EU annually by 2027.

  • 15 July 2022

    The Commission approves “IPCEI Hy2Tech”, the first ever Important Project of Common European Interest in the hydrogen sector. The project aims at developing innovative technologies for the hydrogen value chain to decarbonise industrial processes and mobility. It involves 35 companies and 41 projects from 15 Member States.

  • 27 June 2022

    New gas storage rules are adopted. They will strengthen the EU's security of gas supply in view of the upcoming winters. The new rules will require the EU Member States to fill storage facilities to 80% of capacity by November this year – and to 90% in the years thereafter.

  • 23 June 2022

    The EU and Norway agree to deepen their partnership to increase short- and long-term gas supplies, address high energy prices, and strengthen the cooperation on clean energy, including on hydrogen.

  • 17 June 2022

    The EU, the United States and 11 other countries launch the Global Methane Pledge Energy Pathway to catalyse methane emissions reductions in the oil and gas sector, advancing both climate progress and energy security.

  • 15 June 2022

    The EU, Egypt and Israel sign a trilateral Memorandum of Understanding for the export of natural gas to Europe. Natural gas from Israel, Egypt and other sources in the Eastern Mediterranean region will be shipped to Europe via Egypt's LNG export infrastructure.

  • 25 May 2022

    The Commission establishes the EU Energy Platform Task Force to secure alternative supplies.

  • 18 May 2022

    The Commission presents REPowerEU, a plan to rapidly reduce dependence on Russian fossil fuels and fast forward the green transition.

Documents