Newsletter 240 - Vaccination

Health-EU newsletter 240 - Focus

Ten actions towards vaccination for all

The European Commission and the World Health Organization (WHO) co-hosted a Global Vaccination Summit on 12 September to reverse the spread of vaccine-preventable diseases and stop the spread of vaccine misinformation. The discussions are summarised in the following actions and lessons.

Everyone should be able to benefit from the power of vaccination. Despite the availability of safe and effective vaccines, lack of access, vaccine shortages, misinformation, complacency towards disease risks, diminishing public confidence in the value of vaccines and disinvestments are harming vaccination rates worldwide. Vaccination is indisputably one of public health’s most effective interventions. We must endeavour to sustain vaccination’s hard-won gains but also aim to do more and to do better, in view of achieving effective and equitable health systems and reduce the harm that is caused as a result of the illness and suffering that is otherwise preventable. This also includes making the necessary research and development investments to address unmet medical needs by developing new vaccines and improving existing ones.

Lessons from the day and actions needed towards vaccination for all and elimination of vaccine preventable diseases:

  1. Promote global political leadership and commitment to vaccination and build effective collaboration and partnerships -across international, national, regional and local levels with health authorities, health professionals, civil society, communities, scientists, and industry- to protect everyone everywhere through sustained high vaccination coverage rates.
     
  2. Ensure all countries have national immunisation strategies in place and implemented and strengthen its financial sustainability, in line with progress towards Universal Health Coverage, leaving no one behind.
     
  3. Build strong surveillance systems for vaccine-preventable diseases, particularly those under global elimination and eradication targets.
     
  4. Tackle the root-causes of vaccine hesitancy, increasing confidence in vaccination, as well as designing and implementing evidence-based interventions.
     
  5. Harness the power of digital technologies, so as to strengthen the monitoring of the performance of vaccination programmes.
     
  6. Sustain research efforts to continuously generate data on the effectiveness and safety of vaccines and impact of vaccination programmes.
     
  7. Continue efforts and investment, including novel models of funding and incentives, in research, development and innovation for new or improved vaccine and delivery devices.
     
  8. Mitigate the risks of vaccine shortages through improved vaccine availability monitoring, forecasting, purchasing, delivery and stockpiling systems and collaboration with producers and all participants in the distribution chain to make best use of, or increase existing, manufacturing capacity.
     
  9. Empower healthcare professionals at all levels as well as the media, to provide effective, transparent and objective information to the public and fight false and misleading information, including by engaging with social media platforms and technological companies.
     
  10. Align and integrate vaccination in the global health and development agendas, through a renewed Immunisation agenda 2030.