INSEPARABLE
Eat, Buy and Sell Sustainable Fish

MEDFISH4EVER

MEDFISH4EVER

MEDFISH4EVER
Our Heritage, Our Future
medfish4ever

A Mediterranean in danger

Fish stocks in the Mediterranean are shrinking. Some are on the verge of depletion. All in all, 93% of the fish stocks assessed are over-exploited.  Declining stocks have been signalled not only by fishermen who catch less and less fish but are also by scientists who have been monitoring the situation over the years. 

An estimated 10,000-12,000 marine species inhabit the Mediterranean Sea. But this extraordinary  biodiversity is in grave danger, threatened by pollution, climate change but, most of all overfishing. Further delay in concerted action could result in irreversible damage and a collapse of key-stocks that are essential to the fisheries sector.

The need to act now

As a shared resource, this would be a loss to all, but the impact on fishermen and especially small-scale fisheries would be crippling. Their very means of livelihood not to mention an ancient way of life would be lost. Continued profitability hand in hand with sustainability must therefore be the objective, putting the fisheries sector back on track.

What’s being done?

In 2003, the Mediterranean nations signed a declaration in Venice that laid the foundation to improve scientific research, protect vulnerable areas and limit the fishing effort. EU member states reduced their fleets in an effort to ensure sustainable fishing. Our legislation features national and international fisheries management plans, catch limitations, and environmental requirements. Intense multilateral cooperation encourages all the countries that border the Mediterranean to play by the same rules. 

Experience shows that we can be successful – when we tackle challenges collectively. The outstanding recovery of Bluefin tuna in the Mediterranean is a case in point. Concerted action to better manage this fishery led to concrete results and for the first time in years quotas are being raised. 

But more needs to be done. For this reason, beyond the need for better implementation and regulation of existing measures, Commissioner Vella is launching a Mediterranean strategy to improve the state of the fishing stocks.

Key to this strategy is raising awareness about the urgency and dimensions of the problem at hand, but also to mobilise immediate and determined action by all, including the southern and eastern countries in the Mediterranean. Recent meetings have confirmed the political will to act. The Ministerial meeting with all Mediterranean countries on 27 April will carry forward the impetus to deliver a comprehensive approach.

How can you help?

On a grassroots level action can be taken by small-scale fisheries and coastal communities, but also bynational authorities, policy makers, key stakeholders, large industry fleets, NGOs and scientists. National, EU and multilateral policy must speak with one voice to establish short, medium and long-term goals.

The message is clear; everybody has to assume their part of the responsibility. Everyone, including consumers, needs to get involved if real and lasting change is to be achieved reviving healthy and profitable fisheries, not just securing existing jobs but creating new ones too.

MEDFISH4EVER - It’s our heritage, our future.

Be a part of protecting it.

  1. What is the problem?

Mediterranean fish stocks have declined dramatically. More than 90% of those assessed are overexploited, with some on the verge of collapse. For far too many stocks, it has not been possible until now to attain sufficient data: 50% of catches are still not legally recorded[i] and 80% of landings are from data-deficient stocks[ii]. This has resulted in a constant trickle of lost jobs and income coupled with an intense environmental impact, leaving society to suffer the cost of poor management. The cost is particularly high for artisanal boats, which represent 83% of Mediterranean fleet.

Continued unsustainable fishing of shared resources will provoke the widespread collapse of fish stocks, along with the fishermen and communities that depend on them, marine ecosystems, and cultural traditions. Efforts, such as minimum sizes and Total Allowable Catches for fish, technical regulations for fishing gear and practices, and measures to limit effort and capacity, have been significant but have so far failed to produce adequate results.

This critical situation is testified across the full range of actors, including fishermen, industrial leaders, scientists and environmentalists, and it affects the entire Mediterranean basin. Regulations are in place but not adequately implemented, or the implementation has been delayed and consequently results are not yet tangible. Urgent and bold actions are needed to reverse this, and we are all partly responsible.

  1. What are the solutions?

The first step is to properly acknowledge the situation, as well as our shared and corresponding responsibility, at all levels.

The second step is to secure strong political leadership to mobilise the urgent actions necessary to rebuild a sustainable fisheries sector. This should materialise in a strong political ministerial declaration by 2017, and ensure effective and coordinated initiatives at national and regional level, in the European Union as well as in non-EU Mediterranean countries, the ICCAT[1] and the GFCM[2].

Third, we need the engagement and strong commitment of all stakeholders – from policy- and decision-makers to fishermen, scientists, NGOs, supply chain managers and civil society at large – to contribute with integrated solutions towards long-term sustainability.

  1. What happens if we don’t act now? And if we do?

If stocks collapse beyond the point of no return, the consequences could be catastrophic and irreversible: unpredictable changes in marine ecosystems, widespread economic ruin for fisheries-dependent communities, and deep social distress. While still significant, the economic costs and social impact of acting are much smaller than those predicted if we fail to act now.  

Science tells us that the potential for recovery still remains strong, as in the case of Atlantic bluefin tuna, but we must make sure that fish populations revive as soon as possible. This would deliver extensive benefits, including higher and more predictable yields, higher profitability, job and food security, better environmental status and services. All this would lead to inclusive and sustainable prosperity.

If political and industrial stakeholders fail to ensure the sustainability of our shared marine biological resources, infringing the Common Fisheries Policy and the Barcelona Convention, the European Union would be forced to adopt drastic emergency measures, such as closures and financial penalties (Art.12 of the EU Regulation 1380/2013). For some stocks, it could be too late.

  1. What must we aim for?

The most immediate objective must be to avoid the collapse of critical fish stocks such as hake or swordfish, adopting a socioeconomic approach based on environmental science and ensuring implementation of existing law. In the medium term, the objective is to develop and enforce effective measures that will ensure profitable and sustainable fisheries in a healthy Mediterranean, forever.

Key necessary improvements (from regional to national level) must start with the diagnosis of higher priority issues, followed by the implementation of concrete action plans, with credible tools and binding timeframes.

While exact measures need to be defined, their typology and expected results are clear:

  1. Better stock assessment: data collection, availability and analysis
  2. Better enforcement, control and surveillance
  3. Regionalisation and shared governance
  4. Reduced environmental impact
  5. Multiannual management plans based on the ecosystem approach
  6. More innovation and better technology, more selectivity and no discards
  7. Improved cooperation amongst Mediterranean countries (EU and non-EU), particularly in control and enforcement and scientific research.

 

  1. Who needs to lead the process?

The seriousness and urgency of the issue requires determined political leadership at the highest level, including all countries fishing in the Mediterranean. Within the European Union, the eight Member States with Mediterranean shores (Spain, France, Italy, Malta, Slovenia, Croatia, Greece, Cyprus), supported by the EU and the MEDAC[3], should lead by example, especially in those areas predominantly exploited by them.

The two Regional Fisheries Management Organisations GFCM and ICCAT should pilot all joint efforts and ensure international coordination and effective results across the whole basin.

Industrial associations, researchers and NGOs also have a vital role to play, engaging and capacitating all actors (including consumers, recreational fishermen and other maritime users), to bring Mediterranean fisheries back onto the track of sustainability.

  1. Are there any other issues involved?

Overfishing, poor management and gaps in the implementation of current legislation, in force at regional, national, EU and international level, are the proven main causes of the current state of Mediterranean fish stocks and the associated economic problem.

However, pollution, navigation, and other sources of environmental stress, such as climate change and invasive species, are also having a direct impact on the abundance and resilience of fish populations, and need to be tackled in parallel.

Other complementary measures to promote good governance (e.g. more transparency and protected areas) and market mechanisms (e.g. traceability and minimum sizes) are also necessary aspects.

Finally, fisheries-dependent communities need innovative and diversified strategies for fisheries management and sustainable development, in order to protect not only fish and the marine environment but the millenary cultural heritage associated with them. Projects such as pescatourism, short circuits and other cross-cutting initiatives have already proven successful.

  1. What is the EU doing?

The EU has put forth great effort to improve the sustainability of fisheries at EU and global level. The EU Common Fisheries Policy calls for all EU stocks to be exploited at Maximum Sustainable Yield by 2020 and for all EU vessels to comply with the CFP no matter where they fish.

Following encouraging success in the North East Atlantic, where fish abundance and industrial profits are increasing, the EU is determined to bring overfishing in the Mediterranean to an end, bringing actors together at all levels, and supporting adaptation with accessible funds such as the EMFF[4] and the TAIEX[5] mechanism of the European Neighbourhood Policy. Such funds are available for direct measures, as well as for complementary actions such as socioeconomic programmes, research, cooperation and capacity-building.

  1. What can I do?

We are all partly responsible for this situation, and therefore we all need to contribute in our corresponding capacity to reverse it.

Policy- and decision-makers: It is of the utmost importance to understand the stakes of the problem, and mobilise appropriate resources and leadership to find urgent solutions.

  • EU Member States: identify priority species and areas, define exact measures to achieve objectives (including updating their national management plans) and guarantee compliance.
  • The GFCM, ICCAT, MEDAC, EFCA[6] and other influential stakeholders, international forums (e.g. the FAO[7], the UfM[8]) and financing organisations (e.g. the World Bank): help to define priorities and actions, work together in a coordinated way and commit to common objectives as regards implementation and compliance.
  • The European Commission and other EU institutions: define the policy and a roadmap to progressively achieve the twofold objective of sustainable exploitation of fish stocks and improving economic performance of the fleets.
  • Third countries: work together with the RFMOs[9] (ICCAT and GFCM) and adapting the structure and size of their fleets to the available resources.

Industrial stakeholders: In representing the fishers directly involved in the exploitation of biological resources, and with detailed knowledge of the real situation, organisations such as Europêche or LIFE[10] have a vital role to play, promoting co-management and the implication of stakeholders in defining solutions.

  • Existing cooperative success stories, such as the Atlantic bluefin tuna recovery plan, can inspire further joint actions.
  • Good practices, available from other regions and projects, can also help to pave the way for profitable and sustainable fisheries in the Mediterranean.
  • Engagement across the whole supply chain, as well as civil society, can provide precious support to necessary adjustments. Wholesalers and retailers should promote sustainable products and reject those that are not caught in accordance with the rules.
  • International meetings, such as that of the GFCM (30th May 2016) and ICCAT (November 2016), can be used to align everybody’s contributions.

Scientists and enforcers: Research, surveillance and control organisations are also fundamental actors, allowing for management to be based on better knowledge and a transparent and level playing field. Among others, they could:

  • increase the number of stocks assessed, resorting to data-poor assessment techniques when necessary;
  • work together on increasing the spatial and temporal coverage of scientific surveys;
  • develop cooperative strategies on control and enforcement at regional and sub-regional level, between Mediterranean countries (EU and non-EU);
  • help managers to understand complexity and increase their cooperation with stakeholders to design together innovative techniques to improve selectivity, reduce unwanted by-catches and effectively protect vulnerable species and habitats.

NGOs and civil associations: By helping to increase knowledge and awareness, protect the environment and represent communities, they can foster cooperation and co-management. As the last but largest link of the chain, coastal citizens and consumers at large must engage to ensure that market choices help support the transition towards more sustainable models, contributing towards social innovation and heritage protection in fisheries-dependent areas.

  • Check the labels: EU regulation ensures proper information and traceability, and this in turn helps to support common market rules and standards for products originated in the Mediterranean Sea.
  • Promote healthy and responsible consumer practices.
  • Educational and awareness campaigns on the state of fish stocks based on science, sector performance, environmental accountancy and integrated governance can further contribute towards overall success.

[1] International Commission for the Conservation of Atlantic Tunas

[2] General Fisheries Commission for the Mediterranean

[3] Mediterranean Advisory Council

[4] European Maritime and Fisheries Fund

[5] Technical Assistance and Information Exchange

[6] European Fisheries Control Agency

[7] Food and Agriculture Organization

[8] Union for the Mediterranean

[9] Regional Fisheries Management Organisations

[10] Low Impact Fishers of Europe

 

#MedFish4ever is a shared and top priority. Whether you work in the public, non-governmental or private sectors, your contribution is essential.

This is a platform to showcase actions illustrating your own executive commitments. With these contributions, it will serve as a unique exchange of best practices and successful initiatives so please join in and send us yours.

A chart of Actions 

MedFish4Ever is a joint and long-term road towards sustainable fisheries in the Mediterranean, for prosperous communities and ecosystems. 
There are different ways to get there, all necessary and complementary. In order to demonstrate your endorsement and engage others, we’d like to promote all actions taken.

In order to accelerate results and alignment, please fill in this form describing your actions and send it back to info@medfish4ever.com

Testimonials and endorsers

1. Public authorities and organisations

Andrés Hermida interview at MedFish4Ever launch

Andrés Hermida, Spanish Secretary General of Fisheries
Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Environment – Fisheries, Spain

Zakia Driouche, Moroccan Minister for Fisheries, interview at MedFish4Ever launch

Zakia Driouich, Moroccan Secretary General of Fisheries
Ministry of Agriculture and Maritime Fisheries, Morocco

Gesine Meissner (MEP) interview at MedFish4Ever launch

MEP Gesine Meissner, also Chair of Intergroup Seas, Rivers, Islands and Coastal Areas
Seas, Rivers, Islands and Coastal Areas (Searica) intergroup at the European Parliament

2. Industry and markets

Christian Decugis interview at MedFish4Ever launch

Christian Decugis, Director for the Mediterranean of Low Impact Fishers of Europe Low Impact Fishers of Europe (LIFE)
Low Impact Fishers of Europe (LIFE)

3. Non profit organisations

Marco Lambertini, Director General of WWF International, interview at MedFish4Ever launch

Marco Lambertini, Director General of WWF International
Worldwide Wildlife Fund (WWF)

Lasse Gustavsson interview speaks of Oceana's support for the MedFish4Ever campaign

Lasse Gustavsson, Senior Vice President and Executive Director of OCEANA in Europe
OCEANA

Rupert Howes, CEO of MSC, interview at MedFish4Ever launch

Rupert Howes, Chief Executive of the Marine Stewardship Council
Marine Stewardship Council (MSC)

We know the health of the Mediterranean is in grave danger. But we also know that all is not lost. Scientific research and success stories such as that of the Bluefin tuna show that the health of overexploited stocks can be redeemed.

Through committed, concerted action, the situation can be reversed. In fact, all around the Mediterranean, fishermen and fishing communities, governments, NGOs and scientists are achieving real results through the implementation of measures and initiatives to help stocks recover.

This page seeks to bring together the different actions that are taking place in the region. We invite you to be part of it. We invite you to be inspired by the actions of others. We invite you to help in the recovery of our Mediterranean.

See how in the Call to Action section of our website.

EU Action on the Mediterranean

Since 2007 the EU has been regulating Mediterranean fisheries through the so-called Mediterranean Regulation (Link). The Regulation lays down the rules for managing fishing activity in a way that protects sensitive habitats and prohibits destructive fishing practices in EU waters. The regulation contains technical measures such as minimum sizes of fish that can be caught, closed areas and closed seasons that protect fish during their spawning as well as restrictions on the fishing gear that can be used (mesh size, gear dimensions etc.). Since most stocks are shared with non-EU countries, in parallel the European Commission works multilaterally to encourage all the countries that border the Mediterranean to play by the same rules. However the EU feels that it needs to intensify efforts both domestically and internationally. It has started reviewing the current EU rules to see if they are still fit for purpose and has launched a vast international campaign that takes all Mediterranean countries on board, so that all bolster their management measures at the same time and take common action. Mediterranean countries are to renew their commitment to a healthier Mediterranean Sea by signing a common declaration on sustainable fisheries in March 2017.

Name: Association de Gestion Intégrée des Ressources (AGIR)
Country: Morocco
Type of action: Management
URL: www.agir-env.org

The Association de Gestion Intégrée des Ressources (AGIR) works towards the development of sustainable and balanced artisanal fishing activity in the Mediterranean. It implements a broad participatory planning programme following an ecosystem approach, for the benefit of some 3,000 artisanal fishermen operating in the Moroccan Mediterranean. Fishermen are able to identify the challenges posed by illegal trawling and dynamite fishing, and the creation of a monitoring committee allows them to take part in the fight against these threats.

AGIR carries out a range of activities which include: writing scientific reports to describe the state of conservation and endangered species, and the restoration of habitats and marine zones; training and involving fishermen from artisanal fishermen cooperatives in the drafting of resource management plans for marine areas; establishing of an informal network of established artisanal fishermen cooperatives within MPAs of the Mediterranean Sea; supporting income-generating activities to improve the standard of living of artisanal fishermen in the coastal area of Al Hoceima.

Name: Association de la Pêche Artisanale et Environnement (Small fisheries and environment association)
Country: Algeria
Type of action: Fishing

The purpose of this network is to conserve marine resources and generate solutions for sustainable and responsible fishing. The association has involved local fishers in establishing and maintaining a protected area off the Algerian coast in the Mediterranean Sea with strict quotas in place, aimed at promoting responsible fishing along EU Commission guidelines and giving priority access to fishers who adopt sustainable practices.

Read more (text in French)

Name: Conference of Peripheral Maritime Regions (CPMR) – Intermediterranean Commission (IMC): MarInA-Med COM&CAP project
Country: Croatia, Cyprus, France, Greece, Italy, Malta, Portugal, Slovenia, Spain
Type of action: Other
URL: http://www.medmaritimeprojects.eu/section/com-cap/sub-com-cap

The MarInA-Med COM&CAP project capitalises thirteen maritime projects, some of which focus on the environmental pressures on marine ecosystems. The results of these projects have been used for several political positions. At present CPMR-IMC is involved in two MED Interregional Horizontal projects: PANACEA (S.O.3.2) on environment and protected areas and InnoBlueGrowth (S.O.1) on innovation and Blue Growth. 

CPMR-IMC also organises the communication and capitalisation of several modular projects dealing with issues such as marine protected areas, blue growth and innovation, and on sustainable tourism and ICZM-MSP (Integrated Coastal Zone Management - Maritime Spatial Planning and Integrated Coastal Zone Management). Example of current modular projects: CO-Evolve (S.O.3.1) on co-evolution of human activities in the coastline linked to ICZM and MSP (and the Bologna Charter) (approved) ; Marine Villages (S.O.3.1) on sustainable tourism and marketing and MITOMED+ (S.O.3.1) on sustainable tourism and indicators (under the last evaluation phase)

Name: Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche - Istituto di Scienze Marine: TARTALIFE - Reduction of sea turtle mortality in commercial fisheries
Country: Italy
Type of action: Other
URL: http://ec.europa.eu/environment/life/project/Projects/index.cfm

The project involves fifteen Italian regions in the Mediterranean, and aims to reduce the mortality of sea turtles by reducing turtle by-catches (caused by the use of open sea long line, bottom trawl and fixed nets) through: encouraging the use of circle hooks and turtle excluder devices, or TEDs (special devices that allow a captured sea turtle to escape if caught in a fisherman’s net); and by testing a new sea turtle acoustic repellent and a new type of gill net. The project also aims to reduce post-capture turtle deaths by training and raising awareness among fishermen, and by strengthening the rescue/ first aid centres for the sea turtles.

 

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Name: Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche: LIFE Ghost-Techniques to reduce the impacts of ghost fishing gears and to improve biodiversity in north Adriatic coastal areas
Country: Italy
Type of action: Control and enforcement
URL: http://ec.europa.eu/environment/life/project/Projects/index.cfm

The general aims of the LIFE Ghost-Techniques to reduce the impacts of ghost fishing gears and to improve biodiversity in north Adriatic coastal areas project include: promoting concrete measures to restore and preserve the ecological status of the rocky habitats located in the northern Adriatic Sea; assessing the impact of Abandoned, Lost or Discarded Fishing Gears (ALDFG) on biodiversity in the rocky habitats along the coast of Veneto Region; and estimating the economic value of the ecosystem benefits resulting from the removal and/or reduction of ALDFG. The project also aims to: improve biodiversity in the rocky habitats ecosystem by removing ALDFG and transplanting the ‘noble pen shell’, a large saltwater clam (Pinna nobilis); test and demonstrate the efficacy of methods to map, reduce and deactivate lost fishing gear and to propose a plan for the disposal/recycling of recovered nets; produce an effective protocol for ALDFG management in coastal areas, detailing implemented technical procedures and containing a proposal for an EU regulation.

 

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Name: Costa Edutainment S.p.A: FISH SCALE - Food Information and Safeguard of Habitat a Sustainable Consumption Approach in Local Environment
Country: Italy
Type of action: Fishing
URL: http://ec.europa.eu/environment/life/project/Projects/index.cfm

The main objective of the FISH SCALE project is to enhance the use of sea fish species that are very good to eat but little known and under-exploited ("sustainable", "poor" fish). The use of such fish is expected to have beneficial effects on the consumers' budget - because "sustainable" fish is generally cheaper - and on fish ecology because using under-exploited fish can relieve the pressure over more exploited species. Moreover, the quantity of edible fish discarded as waste - and its consequent treatment - can be reduced. The project has indirectly contributed to its conservation aims by achieving the foreseen results. In particular: more than 100 "fish providers", including restaurants, hotels, fishmongers and distributors have included the sustainable fish target species in their offer/supply; about 2,000 people have been directly involved in the awareness campaign via questionnaires and interviews; the awareness on the project issues has increased by about 27%, via the participation in 99 events and a vigorous media and dissemination campaign; and the selling of target species has increased. The project produced a beneficial "domino effect", from fishermen to distributors to final consumers, leading to the replication of initiatives on "sustainable fish" outside of the project.

From a socio-economical point of view, the project has led to the possibility of buying good fish at cheaper prices, as well as to selling a wider range of fish species, with the providers not only relying on over-exploited fish. As the beneficiaries have accepted to continue promoting the project’s objectives during their education and dissemination activities, and restaurants, hotels and fish providers are willing to continue to supply "sustainable fish" in the future, and therefore project sustainability should be ensured, at least in the short term.

Name: DG Environment - European Commission: LIFE Programme - EU’s funding instrument for the environment and climate action
Country: EU
Type of action: Conservation
URL: http://ec.europa.eu/environment/life/

LIFE is the EU’s financial instrument supporting environmental, nature conservation and climate action projects throughout the EU. The LIFE programme will contribute to sustainable development and to the achievement of the objectives and targets of the Europe 2020 Strategy, the 7th Union Environmental Action Programme and other relevant EU environment and climate strategies and plans. The ‘Environment’ strand of the new programme covers three priority areas: environment and resource efficiency; nature and biodiversity; and environmental governance and information. The ‘Climate Action’ strand covers climate change mitigation; climate change adaptation; and climate governance and information. The programme also consists of jointly funded integrated projects, which will operate on a large territorial scale. These projects will aim to implement environmental and climate policy and to better integrate such policy aims into other policy areas. The new regulation also establishes eligibility and the criteria for awards as well as a basis for selecting projects. The programme is open to the participation of third countries and provides for activities outside the EU. It also provides a framework for cooperation with international organisations.

Name: Discardless: Eastern Mediterranean Sea Case Study
Country: EU
Type of action: Research
URL: http://www.discardless.eu/

The Discardless Eastern Mediterranean Sea case study covers the NW Aegean Sea mixed demersal trawl fishery targeting a multitude of species. Discard ratios are high (>40%) as is fishing pressure on juveniles. High grading also occurs. The DiscardLess approach builds on existing knowledge of unwanted catches in the studied marine ecosystem by: i) working closely with stakeholders and local fishers to develop bio-economic scenarios to cope with the socio-economic consequences of the landing obligation, ii) reviewing and appraising existing solutions in terms of selectivity, and iii) disclosing essential fish habitats and grounds with high concentrations of unwanted catches in collaboration with fishers and couple that with scientific information to minimise discards.

Case Study, Presentation

Case Study, First Year Report

Synthesis and recommendations for Discard Mitigation Strategies by case study, 1st Year Report [1.92 MB]

Name: Discardless: Western Mediterranean Case Studies
Country: EU
Type of action: Research
URL: http://www.discardless.eu/

The Discardless Western Mediterranean case study focuses on two contrasting areas: the French and Spanish Gulf of Lions-Catalan coast and the Balearic archipelago. It focuses on defining sensitive habitats and assesses the impact of potential future spatial strategies. The case contributes to the monitoring of the effects of the implementation of the landing obligation and to the review and analysis of fishing selectivity, taking advantage of previous projects performed in the area. Strategies for discard avoidance are to be devised in tight collaboration with the fishing industry and scientific data to be used to create maps that show zones of high discard likelihood in space and time (i.e. seasonal patterns). The most appropriate and consensual approaches to incentives in the area will then be identified. Finally, the results are to be included in the discard mitigations strategies (DMS) suggested for the case study and potentially other Mediterranean areas and policy recommendations offered on how a discard policy can be successfully implemented.

Case Study, Presentation

Case Study, First Year Report

Regional Implementation Plan for Demersal Fisheries from the Balearic Islands (Western Mediterranean) [8.38 MB]

Name: European Commission Joint Research Centre (JRC)
Country: Belgium, Italy
Type of action: Other
URL: https://ec.europa.eu/jrc/en

The European Commission Joint Research Centre (JRC) compiles data collected by the EU Member States under the remit of the Data Collection Framework (DCF), also covering the Mediterranean. The data is processed and analysed by the JRC in cooperation with Scientific, Technical and Economic Committee for Fisheries (STECF) for stock assessment purposes and to provide scientific advice and management of commercially exploited fish in the Mediterranean, under the remit of the Common Fisheries Policy. The results of these analyses and the provision of scientific advice are made available through STECF Reports https://stecf.jrc.ec.europa.eu/reports.

Name: Europêche
Country: Belgium
Type of action: Conservation
URL: http://europeche.chil.me

Europêche encourages fluid communication between European Institutions and the fishing sector by keeping all relevant stakeholders informed of concerns and objectives of EU fishermen. It promotes impact assessment of human activities on fish stocks from a bottom-up and integrated approach, which includes all stakeholders in decision-making. Europêche points to the spectacular recovery of Bluefin tuna in the Mediterranean, whose quota has been increased by 20% every year, as a best practice example. Europêche proposes management and technical measures and calls for the creation of an ad hoc working group to give fishermen representation in forging fisheries policy.

Name: FAO - General Fisheries Commission for the Mediterranean
Country: International
Type of action: Fishing

Small-scale fishers account for the majority of jobs in the Mediterranean and the Black Sea. The fishers themselves are pushing for greater knowledge sharing and co-operation in order to maintain a sustainable industry.

Name: FAO - General Fisheries Commission for the Mediterranean
Country: International
Type of action: Management

Inclusiveness is a key element in the blue growth framework. The regulations for artisanal fisheries need to be negotiated and voluntary and should complement guidelines, which are based on a human rights approach.

Name: FAO ADRIAMED Regional Project
Country: International
Type of action: Capacity building
URL: www.faoadriamed.org

The FAO Project AdriaMed (Scientific Cooperation to Support Responsible Fisheries in the Adriatic Sea) is aimed at developing scientific and institutional cooperation and capacity in the Adriatic region toward sustainable fisheries. AdriaMed promotes joint actions involving scientists, fisheries managers, and fishers in Albania, Croatia, Italy, Montenegro and Slovenia. The improved cooperation, capacity building and stock assessment led to the adoption of an internationally agreed multi-annual fisheries management plan for small pelagics at the General Fisheries Commission for the Mediterranean in 2013.

Name: FAO COPEMED II Regional Project
Country: International
Type of action: Capacity building
URL: www.faocopemed.org

Within the FAO-COPEMED II regional project, the ArtFiMed (Sustainable development of artisanal fisheries in the Mediterranean Morocco and Tunisia) project focused on small-scale fisheries. Its main aim was to support small-scale fishers in three ports in Morocco (Dikky) and Tunisia (Ghannouch and El Akarit), which were selected as pilot communities. It focused on the involvement of fishers in standardised data collection and developed new activities to generate additional incomes, such as a beekeeping organisation for fishers and the development of tapestry and embroidery for women. 

Name: FAO East Med Project
Country: International
Type of action: Capacity building
URL: www.faoeastmed.org

Most countries in the Eastern Mediterranean lack the capacity to deliver scientific advice for fisheries management. The EastMed project "Scientific and Institutional Cooperation to Support Responsible Fisheries in the Eastern Mediterranean" was created to develop regional cooperation and the expertise needed to comply with the FAO Code of Conduct for Responsible Fisheries. The project introduced the fundamentals of fisheries management such as bio-economic analysis, stock assessment methods, and the structure and functioning of marine ecosystems, as well as fisheries management plans based on the data collected.

Name: FAO Mediterranean Regional Projects
Country: International
Type of action:
URL: www.faomedsudmed.org

The sustainability of Mediterranean fisheries is affected by overfishing, increased levels of pollution, habitat degradation, the introduction of alien species, and the impacts of climate change. The ecosystem approach to fisheries (EAF) has been proposed as a way forward to enhance capacities for fisheries management in the Mediterranean. The initiative combines awareness-raising among managers and policy-makers and the training of fishery officers and practitioners in the implementation of the approach. Pilot studies are underway in Egypt (trawl fisheries), Lebanon (purse seine fisheries), Turkey (small-scale fisheries in Gokova Bay) and Tunisia (small-scale fisheries in El Bibane lagoon).

Name: FAO MEDSUDMED Regional Project
Country: International
Type of action: International Cooperation
URL: www.faomedsudmed.org

The FAO Project MedSudMed (Assessment and Monitoring of Fisheries Resources and the Ecosystems in the Straits of Sicily) is aimed at developing cooperation and capacity in the south-central Mediterranean Sea among the fisheries of Italy, Malta, Libya and Tunisia. A series of meetings promoted joint actions involving scientists, fisheries managers and fishers to contribute to the development of a multi-annual management plan for bottom trawl fisheries and led to the adoption of an internationally agreed multi-annual fisheries management plan.

Name: Federparchi - Europe
Country: Italy
Type of action: Management
URL: http://www.medmaritimeprojects.eu/section/fishmpablue/output

FishMPABlue analysed 31 Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) in five Mediterranean countries, in order to identify the key features for a successful approach to fishery co-management between MPAs and artisanal fishermen, and to develop new tools of governance for artisanal fishery within and around MPAs. It has developed a fishing governance toolkit that matches the conservation goals and supports local economies.

Name: Fisheries Local Action Group - Groupe FEP Varois: Pescatourisme 83
Country: Coastal Mediterranean Areas
Type of action: Fishing
URL: www.marcopolo.asso.fr/

The project 'Pescatourisme 83' aims to offer local fishermen a way of diversifying their revenues without increasing their fishing effort, while at the same time engaging with the general public in a way that raises awareness of the tradition and heritage that fishing represents and the issues the sector faces. The project aims to extend to other, complementary activities such as tasting sessions, accommodation, linking in with agricultural tourism and developing methods to add value to under-exploited species. The FLAG's strategy is to preserve the biological productivity and balance of the ecosystems while contributing to the strengthening of coastal territories. 

Name: Fisheries Local Action Group Terre di Mare: Fish All Days – Home delivery from a fishing boat
Country: Italy
Type of action: Other
URL: www.gacterredimare.net

With the help of the Fisheries Local Action Groups (FLAG), the family fishing company, Facchini Pesca, developed a scheme of direct sales to their consumers as a solution to the low prices they were facing at the wholesale auction. The project included substantial work to raise awareness among the local population of the health benefits of eating traceable and quality local fish. The emotional tie developed between producer and consumer has ensured a solid base of satisfied and loyal customers who value the quality of the both the product and the service offered. The FLAG’s development strategy is based on the revival of the local fishing community through an approach that respects the principles of environmental, social, economic and institutional sustainability.

Name: Fisheries Local Action Group: Groupe FEP Varois: Cap Roux – Restricted Fishing Area
Country: France
Type of action: Other
URL: https://webgate.ec.europa.eu/fpfis/cms/farnet/files/documents/Farnet_Pan2020_13.pdf

 Fishermen, local authorities and scientists have been brought together by a local NGO to build the first steps of a future effective and sustainable management plan to enforce conservation measures in a restricted fishing area on France’s Côte d’Azur. The 445 ha restricted fishing area of Cap Roux was set up in 2004 by the local fishing organisation. An Axis 4 project has supported fishermen to carry out surveillance activities to combat illegal fishing and explore avenues for developing a sustainable management plan. Scientific studies and data collection are helping to monitor the impacts of conservation measures, while cooperation with other users of the marine space is raising awareness of the area’s assets and the importance of preserving them.

Name: Fisheries Local Action Group: Spain Peix de llotja (Fish from the Auction)
Country: Spain
Type of action: Other
URL: www.peixdellotja.com

In order to encourage restaurants, supermarkets and customers to buy locally caught fresh fish, the "Peix de Illotja" project brought the FLAG and local fishing organisations together to promote the concept and develop a certified brand. The brand awards stars to restaurants that commit to buying their fish directly from their local auction. The project has fostered cooperation between the four regional fishing guilds and has built links between the fishing sector and the tourist and restaurant sectors. Mediterranean FLAGs are studying the possibility of developing the concept into a Mediterranean-wide brand. The FLAG strategy aims to diversify the economy of the area and generate employment by focusing on eco-tourism. 

Name: General Fisheries Commission for the Mediterranean (GFCM)
Country: International
Type of action: Management
URL: www.fao.org/gfcm

GFCM has established a task force to modernise its legal framework through a concerted and bottom-up approach that involves relevant stakeholders. These changes have led to the adoption of a number of new measures, such as sub-regional management plans and roadmaps for the fight against IUU fishing. 

Management of iconic pelagic species: Multi-annual management plans have been instituted and updated for small pelagic species in the Adriatic Sea, adding emergency measures as required. The most recent recommendation seeks to ensure that exploitation levels of small pelagics in the Adriatic Sea are at maximum sustainable yield by 2020. 

Protecting iconic demersal species from overexploitation in the Strait of Sicily: The multi-annual management plan adopted applies to bottom trawlers over 10 metres in length whose catch of hake and deep-water rose shrimp represents at least 25% of the catch in live weight or value. It includes management measures of different nature and seeks to apply a precautionary approach to ensure exploitation levels are at maximum sustainable yield by 2020, while protecting nursery areas, eliminating discards and adjusting fishing capacity.

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Name: Greenpeace
Country: Spain
Type of action: Communication
URL: http://pescadodetemporada.org/

Greenpeace Spain has developed a smartphone application with information about which fish are in season, what method was used to catch them and whether they are endangered. Before buying fish, consumers can check whether they have been fished locally, if they are in season and whether they have been caught in a sustainable manner. The app will help consumers to overcome the problem of the inadequate labelling of fish.

Name: Hellenic Centre for Marine Research
Country: Greece
Type of action: Research
URL: www.hcmr.gr

The Hellenic Centre for Marine Research is involved in the development and implementation of the pan-European Marine Biodiversity Observatory System (EMBOS). EMBOS’ objectives include installing a permanent international pan-European large-scale network of marine biodiversity observatories with an optimised and standardised methodology, assessing long-term changes in marine biodiversity and their possible causes taking into account natural and anthropogenic gradients, optimising novel interdisciplinary approaches for research and facilitating knowledge based environmental management. The target stakeholders include EU, national, and international authorities involved in the ecological assessment of the marine environment, environmental managers, decision makers, lawmakers, politicians, scientists, academics, and students. The target species are mostly macrofauna and macroflora, within the EU territorial seas. The expected results of EMBOS are: to provide assessment of the impact of biodiversity change on marine ecosystems; an early warning system for biodiversity change; quantification of long-term changes in marine biodiversity; and a greater understanding of the natural and anthropogenic drivers responsible for these changes.

Name: ICCAT Secretariat
Country: Spain
Type of action: Management
URL: http://iccat.int/Documents/Commission/BasicTexts.pdf

The International Commission for the Conservation of Atlantic Tunas is an inter-governmental fishery organisation responsible for the conservation of tunas and tuna-like species in the Atlantic Ocean and its adjacent seas. ICCAT’s actions in the Mediterranean include the compilation of fishery statistics from its members and from all entities fishing for these species, coordinating research, including stock assessment, on behalf of its members, developing scientific-based management advice, providing a mechanism for Contracting Parties to agree on management measures, and producing relevant publications.

Name: Institute of Marine Sciences (CSIC)
Country: Spain
Type of action: Research
URL: www.icm.csic.es

CSIC is acting to develop deep-sea shrimp fishery management plans including the reconversion of fishing fleets. Shifting deep-sea shrimp fishing practices from bottom otter-trawls to creels in the Mediterranean fleets will demonstrate that shifting gear is viable and profitable. While the target species are Aristeus antennatus and Aristaeomorpha foliacea, the main target stakeholders are fishermen, fishmongers and the tourist industry. CSIC promotes tools to update and develop EU fishing policy and legislation by addressing the MSFD, particularly the preservation of seafloor integrity and protecting the vulnerable deep-sea environment and its biodiversity.

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Name: Institute of Marine Sciences (CSIC)
Country: Spain
Type of action: Research
URL: www.icm.csic.es

Aiming to analyse potential causes for the decline and collapse of fishery on the Maresme coast in the northwestern Mediterranean Sea over the past 26 years, CSIC has been studying the bivalve Callista chione population. Two main causes seem to be responsible for the current status of the bed: overfishing and continuous dredging operations in the southwestern and central part of the bed for beach nourishment. Currently (2016), smooth clam fishery is closed in the area and a proposed recovery and management plan — involving a temporary ban on small-scale artisanal clam dredging and alternatives to beach nourishment  — is yet to be implemented.

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Name: Instituto Español de Oceanografía (IEO)
Country: Spain
Type of action: Research
URL: http://www.ieo.es/

The Instituto Español de Oceanografía (IEO) is a Spanish public research organisation devoted to the scientific knowledge of the oceans and the sustainable use of its resources and the marine environment. Research at IEO covers all aspects of assessment and monitoring of marine resources with particular emphasis in providing the data and advice needed for Spanish public administration, international bodies and the fishing sector to ensure the sustainable and rational use of living marine resources. For this the IEO routinely carries out research surveys, sampling programmes on board the fishing fleet and at fishing markets, and IEO scientists are involved routinely in the assessment of pelagic and demersal fish stocks and the evaluation of management measures such as MPAs, spatiotemporal closures, minimum sizes, gear specifications, etc. The IEO is involved in several international and national projects to determine the role of environmental and anthropogenic drivers in determining the status of the Mediterranean resources and how these factors affect population trajectories, information needed to help evaluate the suitability of different management approaches.

Name: International Council for the Exploration of the Sea (ICES)
Country: Denmark
Type of action: Capacity building
URL: www.ices.dk

The International Council for the Exploration of the Sea works to coordinate and promote scientific research based on data and information products. The results of scientific research are disseminated, and used as the basis for providing the best available scientific evidence for use by managers, dealing with the impact of human activities on marine ecosystems and the management of the exploitation of living marine resources. 

Through strategic partnerships, for example, with the General Fisheries Commission for the Mediterranean (GFCM), The International Commission for the Conservation of Atlantic Tunas, and the European Union, ICES works on:

- The status of eel stock,  covering the North Atlantic North Sea,  Baltic Mediterranean and North African areas;
- Best practices,  methods and data,  to help support scientific advice for meeting global sustainability of fisheries;
- Issues related to assessing Good Environmental Status under the EU Marine Strategy Framework Directive.

Name: International Maritime Organization (IMO)
Country: United Kingdom
Type of action: Other
URL: www.imo.org

The International Maritime Organization has developed and implemented a legal framework for maritime activities, including fishing, on the basis of mandatory and recommendatory requirements developed and reviewed by the Organization.

The IMO takes part in the fight against illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing in cooperation with FAO and ILO. It has designated the Mediterranean as a special area under the IMO International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships, and the Strait of Bonifacio as a Particularly Sensitive Sea Area, and has designated traffic separation schemes and inshore traffic zones in the Mediterranean under IMO's COLREG 1972 Convention. It also works towards the protection of biodiversity and fish stocks in the Mediterranean through the implementation of the IMO Ballast Water Management Convention, carried out through support of the IMO-UNDP-GEF GloBallast Partnerships Project, to address the introduction of harmful aquatic organisms, pathogens and invasive species into the marine environment. Finally it also carries out administrative and technical Backstopping of certain thematic areas under UNEP's Regional Seas programme for the Mediterranean. ​

Name: International Seafood Sustainability Foundation (ISSF)
Country: USA
Type of action: Management, Control and enforcement, Capacity building
URL: http://iss-foundation.org

ISSF’s research and advocacy work is aimed at ensuring effective conservation and management of tuna resources globally. For example, in the Mediterranean, the stock of Mediterranean Albacore has never been properly assessed.  This is a fishery that is almost exclusively consumed in the European Union. ISSF provides financial support for preliminary assessments to be conducted by the appropriate regional management body and its scientific body.  It supports transforming at-sea scientific research into methods to mitigate bycatch in tuna fisheries. The organisation focuses on proactively eliminating all elements of illegal fishing through a range of conservation measures, initiatives, and tools, and has been actively engaged in addressing excess fishing through hosting a series of international workshops and the adoption of the ISSF Capacity Conservation Measure.

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Name: Marine Stewardship Council and World Wide Fund for Nature
Country: Spain, France
Type of action: Management, Capacity building
URL: www.project-medfish.com

This joint project was launched to carry out a rigorous and comprehensive analysis of French and Spanish Mediterranean fisheries using the MSC Fisheries Standard as a benchmark for sustainability in order to drive management and sustainability improvements. The target stakeholders are fisheries, producer organisations and management agencies in the Mediterranean region of France and Spain who are involved through advisory groups, workshops and outreach activities. The scope includes a high diversity of species and is geared towards having a panel representative of the variety of Mediterranean fisheries. This project benefits various actors in the seafood sector: it provides fisheries, producer organisation and managers with a thorough analysis of their current practices. In the long term, it aims to increase the supply of sustainable Mediterranean seafood, thus benefiting all stakeholders.

Name: MEDASSET
Country: Greece
Type of action: Other
URL: www.medasset.org

"Healthy Seas: from waste to wear" is an innovative European initiative which has been implemented in Greece since 2015 by MEDASSET. The ultimate goal of the initiative is to clean our seas from discarded fishing nets, fatal traps for marine turtles and other marine species, and regenerate them to first quality recycled nylon. The Healthy Seas initiative focuses on waste fishing nets in the first phase, but will expand towards other marine litter in the future. The Healthy Seas initiative is a joint venture of non-governmental organisations and businesses to clean the oceans and seas. The nets that are collected as part of the Healthy Seas initiative are not dumped into landfills or burned in waste processing facilities. Instead, they are recycled in order to create high-quality products. Sustainability is the focus, from both the environmental and economic point of view. Healthy Seas brings many stakeholders and initiatives together: divers, fishermen, shipping companies, NGOs, governments, and recycling and production companies, creating new products such as socks, swimwear and carpets. The cleaned fishing nets are delivered to a plant in Ljubljana, Slovenia, where they are prepared for the ECONYL® Regeneration System.

Name: Mediterranean Advisory Council (MEDAC)
Country: Italy
Type of action: Management
URL: www.med-ac.eu

MEDAC works as facilitator in the regionalisation process co-organising the High Level Seminar on the Status of Stocks in the Mediterranean and the CFP approach. In 2016, it widened its focus groups according to wider geographical areas of application (including western Mediterranean, Straits of Sicily and northern Adriatic) in order to provide useful technical elements for the draft of multi-annual management plans to the concerned Member States that will be forwarded to the EC. One of the priorities has been the collection, study and analysis of available scientific information on the state of demersal stocks, characterising the fisheries in order to comply with the landing obligation, entering into force in January 2017.

BFT recovery could not be successfully sold as an option, because the solutions found are not easily reproducible in other stocks. Furthermore, the representation of fishermen is ensured by the MEDAC and if not, the participation on the MEDAC should be encouraged and the representation eventually discussed.

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Name: Mediterranean Information Office for Environment, Culture and Sustainable Development (MIO-ECSDE)
Country: Greece
Type of action: Other
URL: www.mio-ecsde.org

The Mediterranean Information Office for Environment, Culture and Sustainable Development (MIO-ECSDE) acts as a technical and political platform for the presentation of views and intervention of 130 NGOs in the Mediterranean scene. It has been recognised as a key international player in bringing together Mediterranean stakeholders on issues crucial for the sustainable future of the region. The Organisation has a long-standing experience in research, policy, advocacy, awareness raising, capacity building and networking on marine environment related issues, including marine pollution and sustainable fisheries and/or aquacultures.

MIO-ECSDE has been actively supporting the implementation of the Marine Strategy Framework Directive and the Ecosystem Approach; tackling the issue of Marine Litter; promoting sustainable Blue Economy and Blue Growth, advocating for Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM)/Integrated Coastal Zone Management (ICZM)/Marine Spatial Planning (MSP); contributing to the Common Fisheries Policy and the European Maritime and Fisheries Fund. It has also been advocating for the establishment of a comprehensive framework for aquaculture to ensure a sustainable and responsible industry. Recently, MIO-ECSDE coordinated the UNEP/MAP survey on ALDFG in the Mediterranean Sea and within the framework of the IPA-Adriatic DeFishGear project it assessed the socioeconomic implications of marine litter for the fisheries and aquaculture sector. Furthermore, through the DeFishGear research activities MIO-ECSDE has added to the growing body of evidence related to the amounts of marine litter originating by fisheries and aquaculture.

MIO-ECSDE also raises awareness and builds capacities of stakeholders on issues related to fisheries and aquaculture in the Mediterranean.

  • Through the FP7 MARLISCO project it has been raising the awareness to the education community, the general public and the fisheries and aquaculture professionals on the impacts of marine litter and on how to address them. MIO-ECSDE through its pioneer initiative on Education for Sustainable Development (MEdIES, e-network of ~ 4000 educators) has been working on the issue of sustainable food consumption for many years raising awareness on the pressures exerted to ecosystems by fish farming.
  • MIO-ECSDE together with Eco-union and the GEC has recently published a study on “Towards a Green Economy in the Mediterranean” addressing fisheries and aquaculture.
  • MIO-ECSDE has been leading the communication component of the largest Mediterranean project entitled ‘The MedPartnership’ (2009-2015) funded by GEF and coordinated by UNEP/MAP also focusing on the application of the ecosystem approach to fisheries.
  • MIO-ECSDE facilitates four other networks of major Mediterranean stakeholders who play a key role in addressing the region’s environmental and sustainable development challenges, namely educators, parliamentarians, journalists, educators, and universities.
Name: Mednetpesca
Country: Coastal Mediterranean Areas
Type of action: Fishing
URL: http://www.mednetpesca.eu/en/

Mednetpesca brings together different actors involved in the development of coastal Mediterranean areas to increase the visibility of fisheries products and heritage around the Mediterranean. This initiative was founded by French, Spanish, Greek, Cypriot and Italian Fisheries Local Action Groups (FLAGs), but is open to all coastal Mediterranean local development groups who subsequently present their interest and motivations. Mednetpesca helps bring together fishing communities and strengthens their capacity to influence the key decisions that affect their future. It also promotes new opportunities by harnessing the potential of blue growth.

Name: Ministry of Agricultural, Food and Forestry Policies (MIPAAF) – DG Pesca
Country: Italy
Type of action: Management, Control and enforcement
URL: www.politicheagricole.it

MIPAAF has implemented management measures for the national fleet targeting small pelagics with the aim of establishing lists of authorised fishing vessels and protecting nursery and spawning areas at a national level. The expected results are multi-annual protection of the species concerned and economic sustainability for the sectors concerned. 

With regards to the management measures for the national fleet targeting Mediterranean swordfish, the objective is to reduce the national fleet on the basis of historical level of catches issued at the International Commission for the Conservation of Atlantic Tunas and at EU level. The expected results are a multiannual protection of the concerned species and increased economic sustainability of the concerned sector. 

Name: Ministry of Agriculture - General Directorate of Fisheries
Country: Palestinian Authority
Type of action: Conservation
URL: www.facebook.com/dof.pal

Academic research has been carried out in collaboration between the National Centre for Palestinian Research and the Ministry of Agriculture to monitor devil rays (Mobula Mobular) and all cartilaginous fish in the eastern Mediterranean. The main goal of the research is to protect marine species, especially devil rays. The research also aims to gather information about the physiological and biological characteristics of marine species, identifying the biological period of legal fishing for these creatures and creating awareness among fishermen of when they should fish for them.

Name: Ministry of Agriculture - Rural Fish Development
Country: Algeria
Type of action: Job Creation
URL: http://www.mpeche.gov.dz

The ministry reinforces the capabilities of control and the monitoring of fishing boats, while also establishing plans for the management of fisheries. It brings together professional interests and scientific expertise to promote the integration and the sustainability of resources. Its Plan Aqua Pêche 2020 aims to create the economic and technological conditions for sustainable Mediterranean fishing, creating 30,000 direct jobs in the sector in addition to the existing 70,000.

Name: Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development
Country: Montenegro
Type of action: Management
URL: www.minpolj.gov.me

The Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development in Montenegro has adopted and implemented an order on a closed season for different age classes of fish and other marine organisms. It highlights 1 coral, 6 turtle, 36 bird, 20 mammal and 37 fish species which are forbidden to catch in the Montenegrin Sea. Additionally, there has been an order on the prohibition of catch and trade in juvenile fish, undersized fish and other marine organisms. It specifies that related size standards need to be considered for each specie (63 fish, 6 crustacean, 3 cephalopod and 7 bivalve mollusks). In 2014, the Ministry published a Public Call to gain support to adjust the dimensions of mesh sizes on trawls from the 40mm diamond-shaped to a 40mm square.

Name: Ministry of Food Agriculture and Livestock, DG of Fisheries and Aquaculture
Country: Turkey
Type of action: Management
URL: http://www.tarim.gov.tr/BSGM/Sayfalar/AnaSayfa.aspx

In Turkey, the management of fisheries is regulated by "Notification Regulating Commercial Fisheries". These notifications establish closed fishing areas, prohibited fishing gears and methods, prohibited species, and catch limits. The aim is to regulate obligations, limitations and prohibitions on sea and inland fisheries to ensure conservation and sustainable exploitation of fish resources, taking into account scientific fisheries. The Notifications prohibit commercial, sports and recreational fishing of some specific species in the Mediterranean such as Mediterranean monk seal, sharks, sea turtles, and groupers.

Name: Ministry of Rural Development & Food, Directorate General for Sustainable Fisheries
Country: Greece
Type of action: Management
URL: www.minagric.gr

The Ministry of Rural Development & Food, Directorate General for Sustainable Fisheries in Greece has implemented a management plan for bottom trawl and purse-seine fishery across the country’s Mediterranean waters. These initiatives harmonise practice with legislation and include measures like minimum size, spatiotemporal constraints and the use of light to protect specific iconic species across Greece. The main target species are hake, red mullet, striped mullet and pink shrimp. With regards to shellfish fishery, a number of temporal and spatial constraints have been implemented, as well as a minimum landing size of 500 grams for octopus.

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Name: National Institute of Oceanography and Experimental Geophysics (OGS)
Country: Italy
Type of action: Research
URL: www.ogs.trieste.it

The institute operates and develops its own mission, prioritising the basic and applied research fields of Oceanography, Geophysics and Marine Geology, and Experimental and Explorative Geophysics. OGS is currently carrying out a research topic on frontiers in Marine Science, which collects a broad range of analyses on ecological, biological, social, economic and legislative issues, as well as case studies related to the application of the EU Common Fisheries Policy in the Mediterranean and Black Sea. The project aims to provide a broad overview of the problems, tackles local and transboundary issues, and finds practical solutions for the application of the Common Fisheries Policy.

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Name: Oceana
Country: Spain
Type of action: Management
URL: http://eu.oceana.org/en/home

A sustainable fishing and marine protected areas model for the Western Mediterranean Sea: Oceana has written a detailed and integrated habitats and fisheries management plan for the Balearic Islands, which could in the future be applied to other Mediterranean areas. The proposals on fishing management mainly address reducing bottom trawling to specific areas so that this destructive fishing method does not have a significant impact on marine ecosystems, and to improve and promote artisanal fisheries and include recreational fishing in fisheries management. Oceana also proposes the establishment of a marine protected area network that would reach approximately 30% of the Balearic promontory (geological unit of the Balearic Islands), in line with the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) target.

Since Oceana launched this proposal in 2011, fishing proposals have been taken into account by managers and scientists (such as MyFish project), trawling has been effectively banned on an area of 1.806km2 of protected habitats (maërl beds and coralligenous reefs), and the MPA surface area has increased from 4.2% to 17.4% of the Balearic promontory.

Name: Oceana
Country: Spain
Type of action: Management
URL: http://eu.oceana.org/en/home

Oceana has been campaigning to recover Mediterranean swordfish for almost a decade. This year, they have called on the EU and all Mediterranean countries sharing these waters to establish a robust and immediate recovery plan to rebuild the region’s swordfish stocks. The campaign aimed at recovering swordfish in international waters of the Mediterranean. Communication actions were undertaken mainly in Spain, Italy and France. Advocacy has been carried out with the EU as a contacting party to ICCAT and also with individual Member States.

Oceana advocates that such a recovery plan should be based on science and be presented at the ICCAT Commission meeting in November 2016, and that it should include the establishment of catch limits, as the simplest and most effective way to regulate and enforce the management of fisheries. This campaign, together with other initiatives, has contributed to the successful adoption of a recovery plan for this stock at the ICCAT 20th Special Meeting in Portugal (2016), where 51 Contracting Parties agreed to the plan, and for the first time, set a quota system for this fishery.

Material:

Name: Parco Nazionale dell'Asinara: Clean Sea LIFE
Country: Italy
Type of action: Communication
URL: http://ec.europa.eu/environment/life/project/Projects/index.cfm

The overall aim of the Clean Sea LIFE project is to support the application of the Marine Strategy Framework Directive (MSFD) and EU biodiversity policy relating to marine litter. The specific objectives are to increase awareness of marine litter, empowering citizens to become part of the solution; remove existing litter, including lost fishing gear, and prevent further littering; promote "fishing for litter" initiatives; train fishing industry professionals in responsible practices; provide guidelines for the management of marine litter, increase exchange of knowledge and the uptake of best practices; and assist authorities in achieving a Good Environmental Status of the sea, as required under the MSFD. 

 

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Name: Seafood Baskets: FLAG Etang de Thau et sa bande côtière
Country: France
Type of action: Other
URL: www.paniersdethau.fr

To develop a supply of local and seasonal seafood, a local environmental association has used Axis 4 to initiate a seafood basket distribution scheme. It evolved into a distribution network active in four villages, backed up by a website enabling customers to register for the scheme, place orders and select their pick-up point. Connecting local fishermen and aquaculture producers with consumers through a seafood basket scheme helped increase the profile and consumption of local fish, oysters and other seafood in the area, improving sustainability. The project also helped to train a group of “ambassador” customers, giving a strong sense of local ownership and entrepreneurship. 

Name: Slow Food
Country: Italy
Type of action: Other
URL: http://www.fondazioneslowfood.com/en/slow-food-presidia/?fwp_settori_presidi=fish-sea-food-and-fish-products

Part of the internationally renowned Slow Food movement, the Slow Fish campaign launches initiatives that promote artisanal fishing and neglected fish species and inspires reflection on the state and management of the seas’ resources at a local level. The Slow Food Presidia initiative, set up in a number of Mediterranean countries, gives a voice to small-scale fishermen and educates consumers on seafood consumption. The aim of these initiatives is to bring together small-scale fisheries to exchange good practices, raise awareness among consumers of the impact of their food choices, and involve other actors (like chefs) to support small-scale fisheries.

Name: SUBMON
Country: Spain
Type of action: Market
URL: www.canyonsdelmaresme.cat

The #PeixDeCustòdia Project is a local initiative in Catalonia to encourage people to consume fish responsibly, as well as facilitate the identification of local fish products following sustainable criteria. The idea is to work with small-scale local fishermen and involve them in the conservation of the Marine Stewardship Area. SUBMON has a marine stewardship programme to raise awareness about marine conservation and has set up voluntary agreements between different stakeholders in the area to preserve ecological values.

One of the goals of the project is to expand the range of fish species usually offered to consumers, promoting those which are less known and less exploited. The project started through the collaboration with small-scale fishermen in Catalonia, and has now grown to be supported by Barcelona City Council.

Name: The International Ocean Institute (IOI)
Country: Malta
Type of action: Capacity building
URL: http://www.ioinst.org/

The International Ocean Institute (IOI) runs training, and implements capacity building and development on oceans issues at several levels. IOI’s work is aimed at different stakeholders, including policy makers, managers and implementers. IOI writes publications and information for dissemination and to increase outreach. The IOI runs training programmes, offers post graduate degrees, writes publications and occasional papers, gives key note speeches and holds seminars and presentations in the areas of Ocean Governance, Capacity Development and Fisheries Management. Examples of specific actions include the IOI Training Programme on Regional Ocean Governance for the Mediterranean, Black, Baltic & Caspian Seas; a Postgraduate (MA) Degree on Ocean Governance, co-offered with Faculty of Law at the University of Malta; and publications, such as the World Ocean Review publication “The Future of Fish – The Fisheries of the Future”.

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Name: WWF France
Country: France
Type of action: Fishing
URL: http://mediterranean.panda.org/

In addition to a series of reports on Blue Growth in the Mediterranean, the WWF looked at 140 studies of the impact of recreational fishing in Marine Protected Areas of the Mediterranean. It found that while there is often conflict between recreational and artisanal fishing there are also economic benefits. While there is a need for education among recreational fishers, the MPAs also facilitate enjoyment of the marine environment and the development of local economies.

Name: WWF Greece
Country: Greece
Type of action: Certification

A cooperative of purse seine fishers in Greece is working with the WWF to become the first fleet in the Mediterranean to be awarded an MSC sustainable fishing certificate, which both fishers and retailers believe will prove a hit with consumers.

Algeria

Montenegro

  • Glavne poruke Ministarske konferencija o upravljanju ribarstvom u Mediteranu

  • U Briselu se održava Ministarska konferencija o upravljanju ribarstvom u Mediteranu

Croatia

France

Greece

  • Αλιεύματα στη Μεσόγειο - Η αποκατάσταση των αποθεμάτων σημαίνει αποκατάσταση των αλιέων

Italy

  • #MedFish4Ever – Il nostro patrimonio, il nostro futuro

  • Pesca nel Mediterraneo: ricostituire gli stock per ridare un futuro ai pescatori

    GAZZETTA DEL MEZZOGGIORNO (30.04.16)

    IL GIORNALE DI SICILIA (30.04.16)

  • Ue lancia #MedFish4ever, salvare stock ittici Mediterraneo

  • Pesca: Castiglione, Italia capofila su strategia Mediterraneo - Pieno sostegno a commissario Vella su impegno per Mare Nostrum.

  • Allarme Ue, paesi Mediterraneo interrompano eccessi pesca

Malta

Morocco

  • الصيد بالبحر الأبيض المتوسط: حسب المفوض الأوروبي فيلا، معافاة الأرصدة السمكية سبيل إنعاش الصيادين

    AL MASSAE (04.05.16)

  • Pêche en Méditerranée - Reconstituer les stocks pour redonner un avenir aux pêcheurs

Slovenia

Spain

UK