SDG 12 - Responsible consumption and production (statistical annex)

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Ensure sustainable consumption and production patterns (statistical annex)


Data extracted in May 2019.

Planned article update: June 2020.

Highlights


EU trend of SDG 12 on responsible consumption and production

This article provides an overview of statistical data on SDG 12 ‘Responsible consumption and production’ in the European Union (EU). It is based on the set of EU SDG indicators for monitoring of progress towards the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) in an EU context.

This article is part of a set of statistical articles, which are based on the Eurostat publication ’Sustainable development in the European Union — Monitoring report - 2019 edition’. This report is the third edition of Eurostat’s series of monitoring reports on sustainable development, which provide a quantitative assessment of progress of the EU towards the SDGs in an EU context.

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Consumption of toxic chemicals

Consumption of toxic chemicals evaluation 2019.png

The indicator measures the volume of aggregated consumption of chemicals, expressed in million tonnes. The consumption of chemicals is calculated as the sum of the production volumes and the net import volumes of the chemicals according to the equation: consumption = production + imports – exports. The data on hazardous and non-hazardous chemicals show the total consumption of all chemicals regardless of their hazardousness. The two sub-categories on consumption of hazardous chemicals — hazardous to human health and hazardous to the environment — overlap by definition and data cannot be added together.

Figure 1: Consumption of toxic chemicals by hazardousness, EU-28, 2004-2017 (million tonnes)
Source: Eurostat (sdg_12_10)


Table 3: Compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of the consumption of toxic chemicals, EU
Source: Eurostat (sdg_12_10)

Resource productivity and domestic material consumption

Resource productivity evaluation 2019.png

Resource productivity is defined as gross domestic product (GDP) divided by domestic material consumption (DMC). DMC measures the total amount of materials directly used by an economy. It is calculated as the annual quantity of raw materials extracted from the domestic territory of the focal economy, plus all physical imports, minus all physical exports.

Figure 2: Resource productivity, EU-28, 2000-2017 (EUR per kg, chain-linked volumes (2010))
Source: Eurostat (sdg_12_20)


Table 4: Compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of the resource productivity, EU
Source: Eurostat (sdg_12_20)


Figure 3: Domestic material consumption by material, EU-28, 2000-2017 (million tonnes)
Source: Eurostat (sdg_12_20)


Figure 4: Resource productivity, by country, 2012 and 2017 (PPS per kg)
Source: Eurostat (sdg_12_20)

Average CO2 emissions per km from new passenger cars

Average CO2 emissions per km from new passenger cars evaluation 2019.png

The indicator is defined as the average carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions per km by new passenger cars in a given year. The reported emissions are based on type-approval and can deviate from the actual CO2 emissions of new cars. Data presented in this section are provided by the European Commission, the Directorate-General for Climate Action and the European Environment Agency (EEA).

Figure 5: Average CO2 emissions per km from new passenger cars, EU, 2007-2017 (g CO2 per km)
Source: Eurostat (sdg_12_30)


Table 5: Compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of the average CO2 emissions per km from new passenger cars, EU
Source: Eurostat (sdg_12_30)


Figure 6: Average CO2 emissions per km from new passenger cars, by country, 2012 and 2017 (g CO2 per km)
Source: Eurostat (sdg_12_30)

Circular material use rate

Circular material use rate evaluation 2019.png

The circular material use rate (CMU) measures the share of material recovered and fed back into the economy in overall material use. The CMU is defined as the ratio of the circular use of materials to the overall material use. The overall material use is measured by summing up the aggregate domestic material consumption (DMC) and the circular use of materials. DMC is defined in economy-wide material flow accounts. The circular use of materials is approximated by the amount of waste recycled in domestic recovery plants minus imported waste destined for recovery plus exported waste destined for recovery abroad. A higher CMU rate value means that more secondary materials substitute for primary raw materials thus reducing the environmental impacts of extracting primary material.

Figure 7: Circular material use rate, EU-28, 2004-2016 (% of material input for domestic use)
Source: Eurostat (sdg_12_41)


Table 6: Compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of the circular material use rate, EU
Source: Eurostat (sdg_12_41)


Figure 8: Circular material use rate, by country, 2011 and 2016 (% of material input for domestic use)
Source: Eurostat (sdg_12_41)

Generation of waste excluding major mineral wastes

Generation of waste excluding major mineral wastes evaluation 2019.png

This indicator is defined as all waste generated in a country, excluding major mineral wastes, dredging spoils and contaminated soils. This exclusion enhances comparability across countries as mineral waste accounts for high quantities in some countries with important economic activities such as mining and construction.

Figure 9: Generation of waste excluding major mineral wastes, by hazardousness, EU-28, 2004-2016 (kg per capita)
Source: Eurostat (sdg_12_50)


Table 7: Compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of the generation of waste excluding major mineral wastes, EU
Source: Eurostat (sdg_12_50)


Figure 10: Generation of waste excluding major mineral wastes, by country, 2012 and 2016 (kg per capita)
Source: Eurostat (sdg_12_50)

Recycling rate of waste excluding major mineral wastes

Recycling rate of waste excluding major mineral wastes evaluation 2019.png

The indicator measures the share of a country’s — or the EU’s — own waste that is recycled. ‘Recycling’ means any recovery operation by which waste materials are reprocessed into products, materials or substances, whether for the original or other purposes. It does not include energy recovery and the reprocessing into materials that are to be used as fuels or for backfilling operations. Major mineral wastes, dredging spoils and contaminated soils are excluded. The data reflect the treatment of national waste and exclude waste that is imported from non-EU countries.

Figure 11: Recycling rate of waste excluding major mineral wastes, EU-28, 2010-2016 (% of total waste treated)
Source: Eurostat (sdg_12_60)


Table 8: Compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of the recycling rate of waste excluding major mineral wastes, EU
Source: Eurostat (sdg_12_60)


Figure 12: Recycling rate of waste excluding major mineral wastes, by country, 2012 and 2016 (% of total waste treated)
Source: Eurostat (sdg_12_60)
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More detailed information on EU SDG indicators for monitoring of progress towards the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), such as indicator relevance, definitions, methodological notes, background and potential linkages, can be found in the introduction of the publication ’Sustainable development in the European Union — Monitoring report - 2019 edition’.