Individuals who have basic or above basic overall digital skills by sex (tepsr_sp410)

ESMS Indicator Profile (ESMS-IP)

Compiling agency: Eurostat, the statistical office of the European Union.


Eurostat metadata
Reference metadata
1. Contact
2. Metadata update
3. Relevance
4. Statistical Indicator
5. Frequency and Timeliness of dissemination
6. Coverage and comparability
7. Accessibility and clarity
8. Comment
Related Metadata
Annexes (including footnotes)
Eurostat Quality Profile
4.5. Source data

ESS

5.1. Frequency of dissemination Every 2 years
5.2. Timeliness
6.1. Reference area All EU MS
6.2. Comparability - geographical All EU MS
6.3. Coverage - Time < 5 years
6.4. Comparability - over time 3 to 4 data points

Description of Eurostat quality grading system under the following link.



For any question on data and metadata, please contact: EUROPEAN STATISTICAL DATA SUPPORT

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1. Contact Top
1.1. Contact organisation

Eurostat, the statistical office of the European Union.

1.2. Contact organisation unit

G4

1.5. Contact mail address

2920 Luxembourg LUXEMBOURG


2. Metadata update Top
2.1. Metadata last certified 11/03/2019
2.2. Metadata last posted 11/03/2019
2.3. Metadata last update 11/03/2019


3. Relevance Top

The indicator was developed in cooperation with users in the European Commission (DG CNECT) based on the Digital competence Framework https://ec.europa.eu/jrc/en/digcomp/digital-competence-framework and in the context of the Digital Single Market strategy (COM(2015) 192 final).

Indeed, digital skills are a basis for global competitiveness, boosting jobs and growth. The internet has a vital role to play in reaching the goal of achieving high-quality education for sustainable development at all levels of education including education on issues such as media competence.

On 10 June 2016, the European Commission adopted a new Skills Agenda for Europe which seeks to promote a number of actions to ensure that the right training, the right skills and the right support is available to people in the EU so that they are equipped with skills that are needed in a modern working environment, including the promotion of digital skills.

The indicator is useful to describe general digital literacy and skills in using the internet over time. Aspects of accuracy, reliability, timeliness and comparability for the general population are covered satisfactory. The clarity of definition and results for subgroups is however declining; work has started in cooperation with users, NSIs and researchers to improve digital skills indicators. 

 

See data availability for table tepsr_sp410


4. Statistical Indicator Top
4.1. Data description

Digital skills indicators are composite indicators which are based on selected activities related to internet or software use performed by individuals aged 16-74 in four specific areas (information, communication, problem solving, software skills). It is assumed that individuals having performed certain activities have the corresponding skills. Therefore the indicators can be considered as proxy of the digital competences and skills of individuals.

According to the variety or complexity of activities performed, two levels of skills ("basic" and "above basic") are computed for each of the four dimensions. Finally, based on the component indicators, an overall digital skills indicator is calculated as a proxy of the digital competences and skills of individuals ("no skills", "low", "basic" or "above basic").

1. Information skills

Definition in Digital Competence Framework: identify, locate, retrieve, store, organise and analyse digital information, judging its relevance and purpose.

Activities used for calculating the information skills:

  • Copied or moved files or folders;
  • Saved files on Internet storage space;
  • Obtained information from public authorities/services' websites;
  • Finding information about goods or services;
  • Seeking health-related information.

 Levels of information skills

  • Basic: one activity (I_DSK_I_B);
  • Above basic: more than one activity (I_DSK_I_AB).

2.    Communication skills

Definition in Digital Competence Framework: communicate in digital environments, share resources through online tools, link with others and collaborate through digital tools, interact with and participate in communities and networks, cross-cultural awareness.

Activities used for calculating the communication skills:

  • Sending/receiving emails;
  • Participating in social networks;
  • Telephoning/video calls over the internet;
  • Uploading self-created content to any website to be shared.

Levels of communication skills

  • Basic: one activity (I_DSK_C_B);
  • Above basic: more than one activity  (I_DSK_C_AB).

3.   Problem solving skills

Definition in Digital Competence Framework: identify digital needs and resources, make informed decisions as to which are the most appropriate digital tools according to the purpose or need, solve conceptual problems through digital means, creatively use technologies, solve technical problems, update one's own and others' competences.

Activities used for calculating the problem solving skills:

List A – Problem solving

  • Transferring files between computers or other devices;
  • Installing software and applications (apps);
  • Changing settings of any software, including operational system or security programs.

List B – Familiarity with online services

  • Online purchases (in the last 12 months);
  • Selling online;
  • Used online learning resources;
  • Internet banking.

Levels of problem solving skills

  • Basic: one or more activities only from A or only from B (I_DSK_PS_B);
  • Above basic: at least one activity from A and B (I_DSK_PS_AB).

4.  Software skills (for content manipulation)

Definition in Digital Competence Framework: Create and edit new content (from word processing to images and video); integrate and re-elaborate previous knowledge and content; produce creative expressions, media outputs and programming; deal with and apply intellectual property rights and licences.

Activities used for calculating the software skills (for content manipulation):

List A

  • Used word processing software;
  • Used spreadsheet software;
  • Used software to edit photos, video or audio files.

List B

  • Created presentation or document integrating text, pictures, tables or charts;
  • Used advanced functions of spreadsheet to organise and analyse data (sorting, filtering, using formulas, creating charts);
  • Have written a code in a programming language.

Levels of software skills

  • Basic: one or more activities form list A and none from list B (I_DSK_S_B);
  • Above basic: at least one activity from list B (I_DSK_S_AB).

Overall digital skill indicator

Individuals with “above basic” (I_DSK_AB) level of skills:

- “above basic” in all 4 domains.

Individuals with a “basic” (I_DSK_B) level of skills:

- at least one “basic” but no “no skills” in all 4 domains.

Individuals with “low” (I_DSK_L) level of skills (missing some type of basic skills):

- from one to three “no skills” in the four domains.

Individuals with “no skills” (I_DSK_X):

- Four “no skills” (no activities performed in all four domains, despite declaring having used the internet at least once during last 3 months).

Individuals for whom the digital skills could not be assessed (I_DSK_NA):

- Individuals that have not used the internet in the last 3 months).

(For formula and references to original variables collected by the survey on ICT usage by households and individuals, please see Eurostat methodological manual).

4.2. Unit of measure

% of the total number of individuals aged 16 to 74.

4.3. Reference Period

Calendar year.

4.4. Accuracy - overall

High.
In most countries, the target population of individuals aged 16 to 74 represents approximately 75% of the total population. Standard errors for all indicators are not calculated. The estimated standard error (standard deviation), expressed by the square root of the estimate of the sampling variance, should not exceed 2% of the overall proportions and should not exceed 5% for the proportions relating to the different subgroups of the population, where these subgroups constitute at least 10% of the total population in the scope of the survey. 

For most EU countries, the final or net sample size was between 3000 and 6000 elements.

4.5. Source data

ESS


5. Frequency and Timeliness of dissemination Top
5.1. Frequency of dissemination

Every 2 years

5.2. Timeliness

Data were collected in the second quarter in most countries. Eurostat usually releases the results at the end of the fourth quarter of each year.


6. Coverage and comparability Top
6.1. Reference area

All EU MS

EU Member States, Iceland, Norway, Switzerland, Candidate countries and potential Candidate countries.

6.2. Comparability - geographical

All EU MS

The individuals' level of internet skills in each Member State and other participating countries is comparable across countries. The reference methodology used for the ICT usage in households and by individuals has been compiled by Eurostat. This methodology is available for each year and is described in a Methodological Manual. Eurostat provides the model questionnaires on which countries can base their surveys. Surveys are conducted by the National Statistical Institutes or responsible Ministries of participating countries.

However, there are great differences among national statistical institutes as regards sampling design. Some countries use a sample based on individuals as primary sampling units. For other countries the primary sampling units are represented by households registered in the public register and in general the second sampling units are all the actual components belonging to each household included in the sample.

6.3. Coverage - Time

< 5 years

See data availability for table tepsr_sp410

6.4. Comparability - over time

3 to 4 data points

Medium.
The use of the Model questionnaire for the Community survey on Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) usage in households and by individuals for each annual survey, allows comparing the indicators over time.


7. Accessibility and clarity Top
7.1. Dissemination format - Publications

See dedicated section on Digital economy and society, Publications

7.2. Dissemination format - online database

See data availability for table tepsr_sp410

7.3. Dissemination format - other

Not applicable.


8. Comment Top

Possible improvements related to methodology and compilation techniques of digital skills indicators in cooperation with international organisations are under discussion.


Related metadata Top


Annexes Top