Accidents at work and other work-related health problems (source LFS) (hsw_apex)

Reference Metadata in Euro SDMX Metadata Structure (ESMS)

Compiling agency: Eurostat, the statistical office of the European Union


Eurostat metadata
Reference metadata
1. Contact
2. Metadata update
3. Statistical presentation
4. Unit of measure
5. Reference Period
6. Institutional Mandate
7. Confidentiality
8. Release policy
9. Frequency of dissemination
10. Accessibility and clarity
11. Quality management
12. Relevance
13. Accuracy
14. Timeliness and punctuality
15. Coherence and comparability
16. Cost and Burden
17. Data revision
18. Statistical processing
19. Comment
Related Metadata
Annexes (including footnotes)



For any question on data and metadata, please contact: EUROPEAN STATISTICAL DATA SUPPORT

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1. Contact Top
1.1. Contact organisation

Eurostat, the statistical office of the European Union

1.2. Contact organisation unit

F5: Education, health and social protection

1.5. Contact mail address

2920 Luxembourg LUXEMBOURG


2. Metadata update Top
2.1. Metadata last certified 10/02/2015
2.2. Metadata last posted 10/02/2015
2.3. Metadata last update 10/02/2015


3. Statistical presentation Top
3.1. Data description

This data collection is based on the two Labour Force Survey ad-hoc modules (LFS AHMs) carried out in 2007 and 2013, and provides information on:

  • the number of employed persons who had one or more accidents at work resulting in injuries and which occurred in the last 12 months before the survey;
  • the number of employed persons having had one or more work-related physical or mental health problems in the 12 months before the survey which were caused or made worse by work apart from the previously mentioned accidents at work;
  • the type of the most serious work-related health problem caused or made worse by work;
  • the exposure at work to certain risk factor(s) that can affect physical health or mental well-being.

In addition, the data published on the Eurostat website provides information on certain characteristics of

  • the employed person: sex, age, educational attainment level, occupation, employment status, full/part-time work, atypical working hours and the job done when the most recent accident at work resulting in injury occurred (main, second, last job etc.);
  • the enterprise or other employer: area of economic activity (according to the NACE classification of economic activities in the European Union) and the sizes of the enterprises;
  • the accident: whether the accident was a road traffic accident or not, and the period off work because of the accident;
  • whether the most serious health problem caused of made worse by work limits the ability to carry out day to day activities either at work or outside work.

Compared with the administrative data collection ESAW (European Statistics of Accidents at Work), the LFS AHMs 2007 and 2013 give the following additional value:

  • providing information about accidents with less than four days of absence from work, as well as more information about the occurrence of road traffic accidents;
  • including information about work-related health problems and risk factors for physical health and mental well-being;
  • enabling the analysis of accidents and work-related health problems by LFS core variables;
  • enabling a comparison of reporting levels between Member States, economic sectors and other variables.
3.2. Classification system

The data collection is based on the EU Labour Force Survey (LFS) and therefore standard classifications of LFS are used, in particular:

  • NACE - statistical classification of economic activities in the European Union:
    NACE Rev. 2 for 2013 and NACE Rev.1.1 for 2007;
  • ISCO - international standard classification of occupations of the International Labour Organisation (ILO): ISCO-08 for 2013 and ISCO-88 for 2007;
  • ISCED - international standard classification of education of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO): ISCED97 for 2007 and 2013.

Coding in EU-LFS may deviate to some extent from those general standards; for more details on classifications, levels of aggregation and transition rules, please consult the article "EU labour force survey – methodology" in Eurostat's online publishing system "Statistics Explained".

3.3. Coverage - sector

The data collection covers all economic sectors according to the statistical classification of economic activities in the EU: NACE Rev. 2 (2013 ad-hoc module) and NACE Rev. 1.1 (2007 ad-hoc module).

The target populations are:

  • for accidents at work: everybody aged 15 or more and who is working or has worked during the past 12 months;
  • for work related health problems: everybody aged 15 or more and who is working or has worked previously;
  • for exposure to risk factors for physical health and mental well-being: everybody aged 15 or more and who has a job or business (including family workers but excluding conscripts of compulsory military or community services).
3.4. Statistical concepts and definitions

Accidents at work:

An accident at work resulting in injury is a discrete and unforeseen event or occurrence which leads to physical harm even if it did not lead to a sick leave. The accident must have occurred whilst engaged in an occupational activity or during the time spent at work.

Excluded are accidents outside work, i.e. during leisure time and during the journey from home to work. Occupational diseases are also excluded from accidents at work.

The accident concept in the EU Labour Force Survey ad-hoc modules (LFS AHM) follows the one used for ESAW data (European Statistics on Accidents at Work) which is defined as "a discrete occurrence in the course of work which leads to physical or mental harm". LFS AHM includes like ESAW the following more unusual types of accidents: accidents during the course of work but outside the usual workplace (such as on other company's premises, in a public place or during transport including road, railway, tram, boat and plane transport, accidents during a mission and during breaks within the premises of the company), during unusual type of work, accidents caused by a third parties including aggressions in public places, accidents which do not require medical treatment and cases of acute poisoning and wilful acts by other persons. Furthermore, the same exclusions as in ESAW apply, i.e. the following types of accidents are not included: accidents at home and during leisure, accidents on the way to or from work (commuting) or travelling during breaks outside the company's premises, accidents without injury of the respondent, occurrences having only a medical origin, i.e. without accidental injury from outside (such as a heart attack at work) and non-accidental health problems. The latter includes for example cases for which a construction worker develops a back pain over one day (instead of pain due to a sudden movement which should be regarded as an accident).

The two main differences to the ESAW data are:

  • While accidents with less than 4 days' absence from work are included, fatal accidents at work are not included;
  • The reference period of this ad-hoc module covers accidents that occurred during the last 12 months before the interview, in comparison to accidents reported during a calendar year in ESAW.

Work related health problems

A work-related health problem covers all diseases, disabilities and other physical or mental health problems, apart from accidental injuries, suffered by the person during the last 12 months, and caused or made worse by the work. Thus, health problems have a longer, chronic cause whilst an accident is more the result of a very short term or instant (physical) harm. This is a broad concept that covers much more than the recognised occupational diseases.

  • The concept of the work-related health problem is based on a self-assessment of survey respondents in regard with their work-related state of health;
  • The ad hoc module includes complaints irrespective of their severity;
  • It includes not only health problems caused by work but also those made worse by work;
  • It includes health problems where the onset was more than one year prior to the survey, in the case that the respondent had suffered from the health problem during the last 12 months.
  • Persons who did not work in the 12 months before the reference week of the survey may still suffer from a health problem caused by work more than 12 months ago, and their cases have to be included as a work related health problem.

Exposure to risk factors to physical health and mental well-being

Exposure to risk factors is defined as the occurrence of those risk factors which are mentioned as answer categories for the two related AHM questions:

  • Physical health: difficult work postures or work movements; handling of heavy loads; noise or strong vibration; chemicals, dust, fumes, smoke or gases; strong visual concentration (AHM 2013 only); risks of accidents; and
  • Mental well-being: severe time pressure or overload of work; violence or threat of violence; harassment or bullying.

For more details on definitions and concepts in LFS, please consult the article "EU labour force survey – methodology" in Eurostat's online publishing system "Statistics Explained"

Detailed information on the relevant methodology for the ad-hoc module (including the Commission regulation and explanatory notes) as well as to national documentation (national questionnaires and interviewers instructions) can be found in the article "EU labour force survey – ad hoc modules" in Eurostat's online publishing system "Statistics Explained".

3.5. Statistical unit

The statistical unit is the person interviewed.

3.6. Statistical population

See the target population as described in the section 'Coverage - sector'.

3.7. Reference area

The EU Labour Force Survey ad-hoc module (LFS AHM) 2013 covers all EU-28 Member (except the Netherlands) as well as Norway, Switzerland and Turkey. Germany did not send micro-data but aggregated data according to the  dissemination tables published by Eurostat.

LFS AHM 2007 covers all EU-28 Member States, Iceland and Norway (but not Switzerland and Turkey).

3.8. Coverage - Time

The data covers accidents at work occurring during the 12 months before the survey was carried out, as well as non-accidental health problems from which the respondent suffered, at least during 12 months before the survey periods in 2007 and 2013.

3.9. Base period

Not applicable.


4. Unit of measure Top

The indicators in the tables are expressed in percentages.


5. Reference Period Top

The period to which the data refer to is the 12 months before the survey.

Detailed information on the relevant methodology for the ad-hoc module can be found in the article "EU labour force survey – ad hoc modules" in Eurostat's online publishing system "Statistics Explained".


6. Institutional Mandate Top
6.1. Institutional Mandate - legal acts and other agreements

Commission Communication of 21 February 2007 on "Improving quality and productivity at work: Community strategy 2007 – 2012 on health and safety at work" (COM(2007) 62).

Council Directive (EEC) No 89/391 of 12 June 1989 on the introduction of measures to encourage improvements in the safety and health of workers at work.

Community strategy on health and safety at work 2002-2006: Council Resolution No 2002/C 161/01 of 3 June 2002.

Commission Regulation (EC) No 341/2006 of 24.02.2006 adopting the specifications of the 2007 ad-hoc module on accidents at work and work-related health problems. 

European Statistical System (ESS) agreement: LFS 2013 ad-hoc module on 'accidents at work and other work-related health problems', within the meaning of Article 14(1) (c) of Regulation No 223/2009 on European Statistics, according to which European statistical programme can be implemented by individual statistical actions decided by means of agreement between the national statistical institutes, or other national authorities, and Eurostat.

Commission Regulation (EC) No 220/2010, of 16.03.2010 adopting the programme of ad-hoc modules, covering the years 2013 to 2015, for the labour force sample survey provided for by Council Regulation (EC) No 577/98.

6.2. Institutional Mandate - data sharing

Not applicable.


7. Confidentiality Top
7.1. Confidentiality - policy

Regulation (EC) No 223/2009 on European statistics (recital 24 and Article 20(4)) of 11 March 2009 (OJ L 87, p. 164), stipulates the need to establish common principles and guidelines ensuring the confidentiality of data used for the production of European statistics and the access to those confidential data with due account for technical developments and the requirements of users in a democratic society.

7.2. Confidentiality - data treatment

The EU Labour Force Survey (LFS) micro data as received by Eurostat from national statistical authorities do not contain any administrative information such as names or addresses that would allow direct identification of respondents. Access to this micro data is nevertheless strictly controlled and limited to specified Eurostat staff. After data treatment, records are aggregated for all further use.

For more information on publications guidelines and thresholds, please consult the article "EU labour force survey – data and publications" in Eurostat's online publishing system "Statistics Explained".


8. Release policy Top
8.1. Release calendar

EU Labour Force Survey data for ad-hoc modules are released after the end of the reference period once data processing and validation ended. A release calendar does not exist.

8.2. Release calendar access

Not applicable.

8.3. Release policy - user access

In line with the Community legal framework and the European Statistics Code of Practice Eurostat disseminates European statistics on Eurostat's website (see item 10 - 'Accessibility and clarity') respecting professional independence and in an objective, professional and transparent manner in which all users are treated equitably. The detailed arrangements are governed by the Eurostat protocol on impartial access to Eurostat data for users.


9. Frequency of dissemination Top

Not applicable.


10. Accessibility and clarity Top
10.1. Dissemination format - News release

Not applicable.

10.2. Dissemination format - Publications

Statistics in Focus 63/2009 "8.6% of workers in the EU experienced work-related health problems"

Health and safety at work in Europe (1999-2007): a statistical portrait

TNO (2009): "Health and safety at work - Results of the Labour Force Survey 2007 ad-hoc module on accidents at work and work-related health problems" (see ad-hoc module 2007 entry in article "EU labour force survey – ad hoc modules" in Eurostat's online publishing system "Statistics Explained").

10.3. Dissemination format - online database

Please consult LFS AHM 2007 and 2013 data or other LFS data on the Eurostat website or contact ESTAT-LFS-USER-SUPPORT@ec.europa.eu.

10.4. Dissemination format - microdata access

EU-LFS anonymised microdata are available for research purposes. Please consult access to microdata.

10.5. Dissemination format - other

Not applicable.

10.6. Documentation on methodology

For information on the 2007 and 2013 EU Labour Force Survey ad-hoc modules (LFS AHM) on 'accidents at work and work-related health problems', please consult the article "EU labour force survey – ad hoc modules" in Eurostat's online publishing system "Statistics Explained".

For a detailed description of methods and concepts used as well as for other documents related to the LFS please consult the article "EU labour force survey – methodology" in Statistics Explained. 

Publications on the methodology of the LFS can be found on this page of the Eurostat website: Quality reports and methodological publications.

10.7. Quality management - documentation

TNO (2009): "Health and safety at work - Results of the Labour Force Survey 2007 ad-hoc module on accidents at work and work-related health problems" (see ad-hoc module 2007 entry in article "EU labour force survey – ad hoc modules" in Eurostat's online publishing system "Statistics Explained").

Publications on the methodology of the LFS can be found on this page of the Eurostat website: Quality reports and methodological publications.


11. Quality management Top
11.1. Quality assurance

The concern for the quality of labour statistics in general and of the Labour Force Survey in particular has been expressed in Regulations, reflected in harmonised definitions and discussed in Working groups (such as the Labour Markey Statistics Working Group and its predecessor the Employment Statistics Working Group), workshops and seminars within the European statistical system.

Concerning the Labour Force Survey, major milestones in the improvement of its quality have been the adoption of Council Regulation (EC) No 577/98 on the organisation of a continuous, quarterly sample survey in the Community; the adoption of Commission Regulation (EC) No 1897/2000 concerning the operational definition of unemployment and the 12 principles for formulating questions on labour status; the adoption of Regulation (EC) No 1991/2002 of the European Parliament and of the Council making the continuous survey mandatory from 2003 onwards (except Italy from 2004 and Germany from 2005) and the adoption of Regulation (EC) No 2257/2003 of the European Parliament and of the Council extending the survey characteristics and introducing the distinction between structural and quarterly variables.

Eurostat and the Member States have continuously worked also on a voluntary basis to improve the quality of the Labour Force Survey. Annual quality reports were introduced in 2002 and quarterly accuracy reports were introduced in 2004. Standards and rules for preparing ad-hoc modules were adopted in 2004. At the initiative of Member States, a programme of annual LFS workshops was started in 2005.

11.2. Quality management - assessment

The overall quality of EU Labour Force Survey (LFS) statistics is considered as high. LFS surveys are considered as reliable sources applying high standards with regard to the methodology. However, the LFS, like all surveys, is based upon a sample of the population. The results are therefore subject to the usual types of errors associated with random sampling. Based on the sample size and design in the various Member States, Eurostat implements basic guidelines intended to avoid publication of figures that are unreliable or to give warning of the unreliability of the figures.

Eurostat analyses the outcome of each LFS ad-hoc module, and results are published in the final evaluation reports included in the article "EU labour force survey – ad hoc modules" in Eurostat's online publishing system "Statistics Explained".


12. Relevance Top
12.1. Relevance - User Needs

A multiannual ad-hoc module programme is agreed between Eurostat, the national statistical authorities and the main policy users, in particular European Commission services.

Results of the EU Labour Force Survey (LFS) are mainly used by DG Employment, Social Affairs and Inclusion as well as a number of other Directorate-Generals of the Commission for measurement and monitoring of policy agendas purposes. Key users include National Statistics Institutes (NSIs), international organisations, news agencies and researchers, which use of various aspects of EU-LFS data for international or intra EU comparisons. Finally, LFS data are used by Eurostat for compiling detailed regional indicators, for estimates on current education and education levels, higher education and research, and for accurate estimates of labour input of national accounts.

12.2. Relevance - User Satisfaction

Not available.

12.3. Completeness

Please see the quality assessment report in the article "EU labour force survey – ad hoc modules" in Eurostat's online publishing system "Statistics Explained".


13. Accuracy Top
13.1. Accuracy - overall

The overall accuracy is considered as high. The EU Labour Force Survey (LFS) covers persons aged 15 years and over, living in private households, to ensure a comparable coverage for all countries. The sampling designs in the LFS are chosen on a country by country basis (sampling rates vary between 0.2 % and 1.6 %). Most of the national statistics authorities employ multi-staged stratified random sample design, especially those that do not have central population registers available. As the results are based on a sample of population they are subject to the usual types of errors associated with sampling techniques and interviews.

13.2. Sampling error

Please see the quality assessment report in the article "EU labour force survey – ad hoc modules" in Eurostat's online publishing system "Statistics Explained".

13.3. Non-sampling error

Not available.


14. Timeliness and punctuality Top
14.1. Timeliness

Not available.

14.2. Punctuality

Not available.


15. Coherence and comparability Top
15.1. Comparability - geographical

Please see information included in the article "EU labour force survey – ad hoc modules" in Eurostat's online publishing system "Statistics Explained".

For the ad-hoc module 2007, please see the report TNO (2009): "Health and safety at work - Results of the Labour Force Survey 2007 ad-hoc module on accidents at work and work-related health problems" (see ad-hoc module 2007 entry in article "EU labour force survey – ad hoc modules" in Eurostat's online publishing system "Statistics Explained").

15.2. Comparability - over time

Not applicable.

15.3. Coherence - cross domain

Not available.

15.4. Coherence - internal

Not available.


16. Cost and Burden Top

Not available.


17. Data revision Top
17.1. Data revision - policy

Not applicable.

17.2. Data revision - practice

Not applicable.


18. Statistical processing Top
18.1. Source data

The source of the data is the EU Labour Force Survey (LFS). The LFS is a rotating random sample survey of persons in private households. It is organised in thirteen modules, covering their demographic background, labour status, employment characteristics of the main job, hours worked, employment characteristics of the second job, time-related underemployment, search for employment, education and training, previous work experience of persons not in employment, situation one year before the survey, main labour status, income, and technical items relating to the interview. An additional so-called ad-hoc module can be added to address specific subjects that change from year to year. For details see Council Regulation (EC) No 577/98 of 9 March 1998 on the organisation of a labour force sample survey in the Community (OJ No L 77/3).

18.2. Frequency of data collection

The timing of the next Labour Force Survey ad-hoc module on accidents at work and other work-related health problems is currently under discussion in Eurostat.

18.3. Data collection

EU Labour Force Survey (LFS) data is collected by directly interviewing sampled individuals. For the sample design and rotation patterns applied in each country, please consult the article "EU labour force survey – methodology" in Statistics Explained.

The specifications of the 2013 ad-hoc module in the European Statistical System (ESS) agreement "LFS 2013 ad-hoc module on 'accidents at work and other work-related health problems'", within the meaning if Article 14(1) (c) of Regulation No 223/2009 on European Statistics.

The specifications of the 2007 ad-hoc module have been adopted in Commission Regulation (EC) No 341/2006 of 24.02.2006.

18.4. Data validation

Prior to the dissemination of national data, EU Labour Force Survey results are validated by Member States statistical authorities and checked for plausibility by Eurostat.

18.5. Data compilation

Not available.

18.6. Adjustment

No adjustments are done.


19. Comment Top

Currently no comments exist for this data collection.


Related metadata Top


Annexes Top
Statistics Explained article "EU labour force survey – ad hoc modules" (additional metadata information)
Statistics Explained article "EU labour force survey – methodology"