Rights of Indigenous peoples

Rights of Indigenous peoples

Rights of Indigenous peoples

The rights of indigenous peoples rank highly among the priorities of the EU's action to advance democracy and human rights. The goals are to assert indigenous peoples’ rights and boost their capacity to control their own social, economic and cultural development, while enhancing territorial rights as well as capabilities for sustainable management of biological resources.
 
The UN estimates that there are around 370 million people that define themselves as indigenous living in more than 70 countries – predominantly in the developing world, but also in the Arctic. Indigenous peoples are often among the poorest and most marginalised groups in society and face human rights violations and abuses. These include the dispossession of their lands and ressources and forced displacements. 
 
Since the rights of indigenous peoples were first included in the EU agenda in 1997, considerable progress in the recognition of indigenous peoples' rights has been made. As a exemple, in May 2017, the Council adopted the Council Conclusions on Indigenous Peoples. Most importantly, the EU supported in 2007 the  adoption of the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.
 
The EU is convinced that the rights-based approach to development, encompassing all human rights should be the main vehicle in external action for integrating the support to indigenous peoples in the EU's implementation of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.
 
The EU is also funding projects worldwide, through the European Instrument for Democracy and Human Rights (EIDHR). Projects are run by international organisations, such as the International Labour Organization (ILO) and the Office of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights, and by civil society organisations.
 
Find additional information on EU action for indigenous peoples here.

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