Promoting investigative journalism in Afghanistan

Promoting investigative journalism in Afghanistan

I learned in this workshop that people in Badghis don’t need a provincial governor, a district governor or a police chief – they need investigative journalism, because it is that kind of reporting that brings peace, justice, and reform.

Najibullah Binesh, a IWPR trainee reporter in the northwestern Badghis province.

CONTEXT

Promoting Human Rights and Good Governance in Afghanistan – served as a platform for about 150 editors and journalists, who were trained in investigative journalism across the country, and more than 1,800 women and men, who participated in current affairs discussions on Human Rights. To date, the aforementioned trained editors and journalists have produced more than 90 articles and stories including in-depth stories and feature print and radio articles covering human rights and women’s rights issues.

OBJECTIVES

  • Increased capacity of journalists and editors to conduct investigative journalism;
  • Increased number of in-depth reports produced on issues of human rights;
  • Greater civil society engagement;
  • Improved independent human rights monitoring;

RESULTS

  • 151 journalists and editors, both male and female, received professional and hands-on training on investigative journalism;
  • 18 current affairs discussion on humans and women’s rights arranged and held across 18 provinces;
  • Eight radio forums held and aired through local radio stations across different regions to an audience of around 5 million Afghans;
  • 6 human rights citizens watchdog desks established;
  • More than 90 in-depth radio and print articles on women and human’s rights;

FACTS AND FIGURES

  • Mobilisation of communities and improved public awareness of basic human rights;
  • The acquisition of knowledge and facilitation of discussion concerning current issues will stimulate cooperation between civil society and local government officials;

TESTIMONY

Various participants participating to the project's activities expressed their satisfaction on the outcomes and results achieved

“For the first time, this debate gave me the chance to speak out about the injustice done to me,” Shah Gul, an IWPR debate participant in Kandahar.

 

“Despite being a journalist and a radio producer for seven years, it was my first time to realise that investigation too is an important element of journalism. I used to think that investigation was part of a police officer’s and/or a prosecutor’s job,” Aria Ahmadzai, journalist and radio producer at the Killid Radio.

 

“I learned in this workshop that people in Badghis don’t need a provincial governor, a district governor or a police chief – they need investigative journalism, because it is that kind of reporting that brings peace, justice, and reform,” Najibullah Binesh, an IWPR trainee reporter in the northwestern Badghis province.