EUROPEAN SOCIAL FUND

LTU project KS2 - Scope of the Shared case history system

LTU project KS2 - Scope of the Shared case history system

Key Step 1 - Purpose of PolicyKey Step 2 - Shared Case History ScopeKey Step 3 - Policy StatementKey Step 4 - ProceduresKey Step 5 - Stakeholder Buy-InKey Step 6 - Preventing Exclusion RiskKey Step 7 - Assessing ImpactKey Step 8 - EvolutionKey Step 9 - EvaluationKey Step 1 - Purpose of PolicyKey Step 2 - Shared Case History ScopeKey Step 3 - Policy StatementKey Step 4 - ProceduresKey Step 5 - Stakeholder Buy-InKey Step 6 - Preventing Exclusion RiskKey Step 7 - Assessing ImpactKey Step 8 - EvolutionKey Step 9 - Evaluation

Deciding the range of actors to be involved in developing system ...

... Offering the most suitable measures

/esf/transnationality/file/ltu-ks2-xlpngltu-ks2-xl.png

LTU Project - Key Steps 2 - Scope of the Case history System
Key objective of KS2:
Ensuring partnership provides tailored support to meet LTU client needs. 
This step is necessary to ensure that Member States (MSs) are able to develop measures best suited to their clients’ needs and the institutional setting.
Further info:
KS2 Elements:
A single customer view is as much about organisational change as it is technology.
According to the LTU Recommendation, MSs remain competent to choose the labour market measures best suited to their individual situation. A range of actors can be involved in provision of a Single Points of Customer Contact (SPOC) including:
  • Public Employment Services (PES)
  • Social service Providers
  • Public Authorities
  • Training and education institutions
  • Integrated Job Centres (PES and Benefit Authorities)
  • Municipalities
  • Private Employment Agencies (PRES)
  • NGOs Organisational Consortia.
SPOC may be based upon various models of cooperation, tailored to the specific needs of the MS, taking into account the capabilities and scope of the partners. One actor will have responsibility for ensuring provision of a SPOC (in most cases from one organisation). This will need to be determined, and the roles and responsibilities for developing the service model, including the case records system, determined between participating actors.
The depth of service integration may range from voluntary, occasional co-operation to providing services in a united organisational framework. The optimal depth of integration will depend on the relations between the services, as well as the institutional constraints.
The range of services to be integrated can best derived from identifying the needs of the jobseekers. As a first step there should be a systematic analysis of the labour market needs and integration barriers of LTU clients, e.g. counselling on benefit claims, advice on health problems or debt. Then the services most closely related to employment services and each other should be identified. Finally, the obstacles to the integration process should be considered and the scope of integration limited to a range of services whose integration is manageable, given the constraints of the institutional context.
The depth of integration may vary according to the service integrated. The overall strength of non-integrated services and degree of coordination in public administration should be considered. Where services are dissimilar and existing provision weak, it may be advisable to initially develop less ambitious plans.
There can be advantages if the lead organisation has a labour market integration focus, and a dispersed local network. In very localised systems, it may be sensible for municipal actors to lead.
There is a significant risk to integrating systems where no single partner feels accountable for the actions of the partnership because of the shared responsibility.
In order to ensure that records provide a holistic, comprehensive, and logical set of data concerning an individual client’s situation, it is important to avoid duplication of inputs. As well as one lead agency having responsibility for maintenance of the joint database, all partners should contribute to the development of a client path.
Milestones or key points with potential influence on the outcomes:
(the “Rationale” describes why the corresponding Milestone has been identified; the “Actions to consider” indicates some directions to meet the “Rationale”; and Examples or highlights of some Cases or Videos sections are provided when specifically connected.)
KS2-M01 - Deciding the range of actors that can be involved in developing a single point of customer contact (SPOC)
Rationale
Actions to consider
Member States are competent to choose the labour market measures best suited to their individual situation.
A range of actors can be involved in provision of a SPOC including PES, social service providers, Public Authorities, Training and Education institutions, Municipalities, Private Employment services, NGOs.
Related info/Example:
KS2-M02 - Determining the model of cooperation for a SPOC
Rationale
Actions to consider
Partnerships should be tailored to the specific needs of a Member State.
One actor should have lead responsibility for provision of a SPOC, partners’ roles and responsibility should be determined by an assessment of their remit and capacity.
Related info/Example:
KS2-M03 - Identifying the depth of service integration
Rationale
Actions to consider
Different degrees of co-operation are possible.
The optimal depth of integration will depend on the relations between service providers and extent of institutional constraints.
Related info/Example:
KS2-M04 - Agreeing the range of services to be integrated to meet identified needs of jobseekers
Rationale
Actions to consider
The obstacles to integrating processes should be considered and the scope of integration limited to a range of services whose integration is manageable.
A systematic analysis should be undertaken of labour market needs, strength of existing co-operation and the integration barriers faced by LTU clients.
Related info/Example:
KS2-M05 - Choosing the lead organisation
Rationale
Actions to consider
The SPOC must maintain a strong integration focus.
The lead organisation should have a labour market orientation and foster co-operation between actors to facilitate co-ordination of services.
Related info/Example:
KS2-M06 - Establishing accountability between service providers
Rationale
Actions to consider
Service integration depends upon responsibility sharing between providers.
A clear statement of responsibilities must be contained in a Memorandum agreed by all partners.
Related info/Example:
KS2-M07 - Compiling an holistic, comprehensive set of client data
Rationale
Actions to consider
Logical data compilation is needed to avoid duplication of inputs.
One lead Agency should have responsibility for maintenance of the joint data base with all partners contributing to the development of a client path.
Related info/Example:
KS2-M08 - Defining organisational boundaries between partners
Rationale
Actions to consider
It is necessary to avoid the risk of overlap in order to ensure that client information gathered contributes to the development of a consistent overall presentation of a client’s situation.
Each partner input to the client record system should be described so that information gathered supports development of the overall picture.
Related info/Example:
KS2-M09 - Designing format for Data recording
Rationale
Actions to consider
Compatibility with various information feeds is needed for data to add value to the overall process.
A consistent format for system data should be agreed and developed.
Related info/Example:

/esf/transnationality/file/ltu-ks2-xlpngltu-ks2-xl.png

LTU Project - Key Steps 2 - Scope of the Case history System