chevron-down chevron-left chevron-right chevron-up home circle comment double-caret-left double-caret-right like like2 twitter epale-arrow-up text-bubble cloud stop caret-down caret-up caret-left caret-right file-text

EPALE

Electronic Platform for Adult Learning in Europe

 
 

Resource

Family Learning in Prisons: A Resource for Prisons and Learning Providers

Language: EN

Posted by NSS UK

The Learning and Work Institute have a free resource designed to help prisoners and learning providers to maintain meaningful relationships between prisoners and their family while serving their sentences. Research has shown that prisoners who continue to build familial relationships are less likely (38%) to reoffend when they are released than those who don’t. It also found that two-thirds of women behind bars are mothers and 54% of all offenders have children under the age of 18 when they are incarcerated. By encouraging strong relationships between prisoners and their families, learning providers can help with rehabilitation so convicts can return to society as better citizens. As children of prisoners frequently experience mental health issues, sometimes displaying anti-social behaviour patterns, family learning of this kind can also help to ensure that children grow to be better citizens as well.

The resource should be used to encourage and support family learning programmes in prisons. Family learning is recognised as having a significant impact on all family members by helping them: build skills for education and employment; aspire to achieve more in life; improve personal relationships; and build confidence and resilience.

The resource discusses research, the benefits of different family learning environments in prisons, practitioners who will benefit from using the resource, different approaches to family learning programmes in prisons, and provides a tool to help measure the impact of family learning developments, plus more useful information. 


You may also be interested in:

  • This resource of a toolkit provided by the Prisoners' Education Trust (PET) that discusses different types prison-university partnerships
  • This resource by the Alliance of Sport focused on how Sport for Development and the Criminal Justice Sectors can work together to achieve a sustainable whole system impact
  • This blog post about a teacher who left the industry to focus on a career in family learning and parent engagement
  • This blog post about Cardiff City Football Club and their prison engagement programme that provides young adults with qualifications and experience
Resource Author(s): 
Learning and Work Institute
Publication Date:
Sunday, 1 January, 2017
Language of the document:
Type of resource: 
Open Educational Resources
Country:
Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Epale SoundCloud Share on LinkedIn