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EPALE

Electronic Platform for Adult Learning in Europe

 
 

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Dyslexia and Drug Use: Hiding in Plain Sight

Posted by Sinead Whitty 5 months 3 weeks ago

Wednesday 12 July 2017
Dublin
,

This conference is a collaboration between Soilse and the Dyslexia Association of Ireland (DAI).

Donald Ewing of the DAI will explore the links between dyslexia and drug use. Dónal Rice of the Irish Human Rights and Equality Commission will discuss The Public Sector Duty: Eliminating Discrimination, Promoting and Protecting Human Rights. There will be a panel discussion and participants will hear the lived experiences of dyslexia.

Pat O'Mahoney, Education Research Officer with Education and Training Boards Ireland (ETBI) will open the conference and Niamh O'Reilly, CEO, Aontas will deliver the concluding remarks.

A light lunch will be provided.

Book your place here.

 

Event language(s):
Attending fee: 
No
Registration deadline: 
11/07/2017
Online event: 
No
Organised by: 
Soilse, the HSE's Addiction Rehabilitation Service, and the Dyslexia Association of Ireland
Organiser type: 
Other event
Target group: 
Adult learning networks & organisations
Policy makers
Theme addressed:
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  • Sinead Whitty's picture

    Sincere thanks to Dave and colleagues at Soilse for organising such a worthwhile event today!

    Speakers from Soilse, the Dyslexia Association of Ireland, the Irish Human Rights and Equality Commission, the Education and Training Boards, Career Paths and Aontas - the National Adult Learning Organisation, discussed how dyslexia is not predicitive of drug abuse, but is a risk factor.

    The large audience learned about legislation that protects the rights of dyslexic people, the challenges that still need to be overcome, and the relevant supports and educational opportunities that exist for dyslexic adults.

    Perhaps the most powerful accounts were from two speakers who are now successful adult learners. They shared the harrowing impact that undiagnosed dyslexia had on their lives and the transformative effect that a dyslexia diagnosis and the right supports have had to enable them to reach their full potential.